Education & Workforce Development

Estate planning lawyers can become specialists: New exam lets Indiana attorneys become certifiedRestricted Content

September 25, 2006
Michael W.
Attorney Jeff Hawkins has focused his law practice on estate planning and administration law for 14 years. He considers himself experienced but is not yet ready to declare himself a "specialist" or "certified" estate-planning attorney. That happens in November, and the designation depends on results of an exam. The Indiana State Bar Association has recently adopted a plan to make estate planning and administration a specialty status of law in Indiana, joining four other focuses that have donned the stature...
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VOICES FROM THE INDUSTRY: Taxes, school, health costs challenge affluent familiesRestricted Content

September 25, 2006
Ralph Nowak
Affluent families face many threats to their wealth. But three forces eroding the legacies in almost all of them are taxes, education costs and post-retirement health care. Fortunately, with proper planning, there are steps you can take to help ensure your wealth carries you through retirement comfortably with ample left over for your heirs. Make taxes manageable Taxes may be unavoidable but they can be managed in a way that makes them less destructive to your wealth. Specifically, the alternative...
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TAWN PARENT Commentary: Our dead deserve better than thisRestricted Content

September 25, 2006
Forget coming late to the daylightsaving time party. Even higher on the list of things we Hoosiers should be embarrassed about is our coroner system. Of course, embarrassment isn't the half of it. More troubling is that we elect and counties pay coroners who need no qualifications whatsoever, other than being adults and living in the county where they're elected. (Their day jobs range from truck driver to boat pilot.) Worst of all is the hindrance these underqualified officials can...
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NOTIONS: Dear philanthropist: Make me a daydream believerRestricted Content

September 18, 2006
Bruce Hetrick
Last month, I picked up my boys in Fort Wayne, drove north on Interstate 69, hooked a left at Interstate 94, and got off at the Portage, Mich., exit. There, we whiled away the weekend at a family reunion. The grownups ate too much, caught up on gossip and puttered around the lake in the speedboat. The teenagers, whom we rarely saw, did X-Box battle in the basement. On Sunday, after the kids had surfaced for lunch and the grandparents...
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Student sponsorship deal raises money, criticismRestricted Content

September 11, 2006
Andrea Muirragui
The Indianapolis office of Zurich-based UBS Financial Services Inc. is experimenting with "adopting" the freshman class at Herron High School as the UBS Scholars of 2010. Its foundation made a $100,000 gift to the startup charter school, and local employees made a commitment to tutor, mentor and otherwise support its first 92 students.
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State's new arts leader plans to take more public role: Indiana Arts Commission's strategy calls for Executive Director Lewis Ricci to be a vocal advocate for fundingRestricted Content

September 11, 2006
Jennifer Whitson
In the fall of 2005, the Indiana Arts Commission started a rigorous study to draft its next five-year strategy. After public hearings around the state, the full 15-member arts commission voted this summer to adopt the new plan. And now commissioners have someone to implement it. The chosen man, Lewis Ricci, is itching to take over the spot and turn the commission into a bully pulpit for the importance of the arts-and the need for public funding. "Advocacy is one...
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TOM HARTON Commentary: Crime takes indirect swipe at the artsRestricted Content

September 11, 2006
In Indianapolis, when the crime rate goes up or kids' test scores go down, it's not uncommon for people to point the finger at publicly funded sports facilities. "Our priorities are screwed up," observers opine. "We spend too much money on these playgrounds for the rich, and not enough on cops, courts and public education." The sports establishment here has been batting away this criticism for years. It goes with the territory in a city where sports is an important...
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Museums trip out over loyal donors: Cultural organizations are offering travel opportunities to generous patrons to inform them, gain more supportRestricted Content

September 11, 2006
Scott Olson
With a new director in place and a $74 million renovation and expansion complete, the next step for the Indianapolis Museum of Art is courting donors to financially back the enlarged operations. Those who pledge at least $2,500 to the IMA are invited to accompany, at their own expense, IMA Director Maxwell Anderson and his wife on a cruise in the fall of 2007 to Spain, France and Italy. The excursion coincides with the opening next year of the museum's...
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BRIAN WILLIAMS Commentary: Downtown needs a grand, artful facilityRestricted Content

September 11, 2006
On Sept. 1, 45 competitors from nearly 20 countries arrived for the seventh quadrennial International Violin Competition of Indianapolis. Through the middle of September at venues around the city, these talented men and women will compete for one of the richest artistic prizes in the world. In a few short months, the American Pianists Association will undertake its biennial competition for the Cole Porter Jazz Fellowship. Again, a cadre of some of the instrument's most accomplished American performers will come...
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Young architect honored for design of orphanage: Cluster complex plan wins international competitionRestricted Content

September 4, 2006
Jennifer Whitson
Chunsheh Teo is a driven man. The 28-year-old sometimes works long days as an architectural graduate at Ratio Architects Inc. and spends his off time building furniture for the home he and his wife recently purchased in Irvington. On a recent weekend, he built a new fence for the yard. Oh, and he also enters international design competitions in his down time-about seven in the last three years. "It's just kind of a fun thing to do," Teo said. At...
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St. Vincent makes bigger investment in charity care: Need drives construction of Primary Care Center set to open in mid-2007Restricted Content

August 28, 2006
Tom Murphy
Here's a lesson they don't teach in business school: Take an entity that loses $4 million annually and expand it 50 percent. That's the plan St. Vincent Indianapolis Hospital unveiled earlier this month when it broke ground on a new, larger Primary Care Center serving indigent, underinsured and uninsured patients. That population of poor, mostly Spanish-speaking patients has more than doubled its annual visits since 2000. St. Vincent officials say the new $4 million center is 10 years overdue. Their...
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Culinary training gains popularity as restaurant boom continuesRestricted Content

August 28, 2006
Victoria D. Williams
Indiana Business College will launch a Chef's Academy downtown next month, offering an 18-month program intended to produce trained "culinarians." Ivy Tech Community College, meanwhile, is looking for space to expand its two-year culinary arts program, which has seen explosive growth.
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Racing toward a new type of learning center: Decatur, Panther team up on educational facilityRestricted Content

August 28, 2006
Scott Olson
Mention a career in motorsports to most youngsters and they imagine whizzing around the track like NASCAR's Tony Stewart or Sam Hornish Jr., points leader of the Indianapolis Racing League. But a partnership between Indianapolisbased Panther Racing LLC and Decatur Township Schools wants to introduce students to more practical professions within the sport by providing the resources in a hands-on learning environment. The result is the Panther Education Center, set to open next fall near the racing team's headquarters at...
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NOTIONS: Has our love for labor been lost?Restricted Content

August 28, 2006
Bruce Hetrick
Bruce Hetrick is on vacation this week. In his absence, this column, which appeared on Sept. 1, 2003, is being reprinted. The Labor Days of my memory are happy-sad affairs. The weather is muggy. The family's gathered at some park or pond, river or lake. Burgers sizzle on the grill. Frisbees fly through the air. And after supper, there's touch football with dads and brothers, kids and cousins, until dusk drops her shadowy curtain on yet another summer. In my...
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PROFILE FIRST JURY INC.: Practice makes perfect Local trial consultants aim to help lawyers prepare for litigationRestricted Content

August 28, 2006
Susan Raccoli
PROFILE FIRST JURY INC. Practice makes perfect Local trial consultants aim to help lawyers prepare for litigation Blame the name. Attorneys could be forgiven if they thought hiring Indianapolis-based First Jury Inc. would get them advice on choosing a jury sympathetic to their clients' cause. But its staff won't tell them to avoid the woman with her arms crossed or the man who won't make eye contact. Instead, they'll assemble a jury of their own and stage a mock trial,...
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Woman sets sights on freedom: Disability isn't keeping shop owner from goalRestricted Content

August 28, 2006
Candace Beaty
Two doors opened for Pam Evans on Aug. 5-one to her own clothing store and the other to her independence. The Cherry Shop represents both to Evans, who lost most of her sight over the course of a weekend in 1998 to a genetic eye disease called angioid streaks. Left with only her peripheral vision, she also lost her career in real estate and corporate sales. After a period of depression, Evans decided she wouldn't lose it all. "I felt...
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Charter schools leader tackles new role: Mayor chooses Harris to launch broader public education programRestricted Content

August 28, 2006
Scott Olson
The Indiana General Assembly's decision in 2001 to hand Indianapolis Mayor Bart Peterson the keys to the city's new charter schools initiative marked the first time in the nation that a municipal leader had been given the authority to grant charters. The unusual approach to improve educational opportunities here has earned the city several accolades, including last month's prestigious Harvard University Innovations in American Government Award. Now the mayor wants to expand upon the program's success and launch a not-for-profit...
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Lean manufacturers take stock of accounting innovation: Fishers company optimistic movement will gain favorRestricted Content

August 28, 2006
Anthony Schoettle
The leanest aspect of lean manufacturing is moving from the shop floor to the accounting office, where a new recordkeeping system is gaining a following. Proponents of so-called lean accounting say it's better than traditional accounting at measuring the cost savings and efficiencies of lean manufacturing, a business-improvement strategy that shortens the time between customer order and shipment. Instead of simply looking at inventory levels and sales numbers as traditional accounting does, lean accounting measures things such as worker productivity...
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ECONOMIC ANALYSIS: Simplistic ideas get in way of efforts to increase wagesRestricted Content

August 21, 2006
Patrick Barkey
To the small cadre of economists who have worked their entire professional lives trying to understand the complexities of how and why the labor market rewards some skills, occupations and people more than others, the popularity of the idea of a government-mandated minimum wage must be depressing. But it shouldn't be surprising. The notion that complex market outcomes can be explained by simplistic notions like greed or discrimination-solvable by the stroke of a lawmaker's pen-will probably always have a superficial...
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IU hires consultant for business plan overhaulRestricted Content

August 21, 2006
Peter Schnitzler
Taking a page from Purdue University's playbook, Indiana University has quietly put its economic-development efforts under review. IU hired Chicago-based Huron Consulting Group this month to examine its process of economic development and evaluate whether it matches Gov. Mitch Daniels' business-first agenda.
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RETURN ON TECHNOLOGY: Programmers make lousy site designersRestricted Content

August 21, 2006
Tim Altom
Many, perhaps most, Web sites are hard to use. That applies to commercial sites, personal sites, almost any kind of site. In the early days of the Web, nobody was surprised at this, because the Web was a dancing bear. The wonder wasn't that it danced gracefully, but that it danced at all. Today, visitors are much more discerning. In fact, there is a cottage industry in lambasting poorly designed sites. One of my favorite places to go on the...
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SPORTS: A grim look at what the city's future could holdRestricted Content

August 21, 2006
Bill Benner
I was having a fitful time trying to sleep. For some reason, the word "priorities" kept running through my mind. Then, suddenly, I felt as if I were awake, standing in downtown Indianapolis. I caught site of a calendar in a storefront window. I blinked and shook my head. It read August 2026, but the city didn't look 20 years more modern. If anything, it looked 20 years older. It was as if time had passed by the Indy I...
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State's Medicaid goal: better, cheaper care: FSSA says new approach will boost efficiencyRestricted Content

August 21, 2006
Tom Murphy
Better care through better management. That's the mantra behind the Indiana Family and Social Services Administration's push to limit Medicaid's cost growth to 5 percent annually. The state entity announced this month that it awarded $4.4 billion in contracts to three managed care organizations to provide coverage for pregnant women and children under its Hoosier Healthwise program. Next, Indiana wants to hire care managers to monitor the well-being of every Medicaid recipient in its aged, blind and disabled category. That...
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Professor reinvents classroom: Improving interaction reason behind DyKnowRestricted Content

August 21, 2006
Scott Olson
Dave Berque knew his first college teaching assignment couldn't get any worse when a fire in the overhead lights barely got a reaction from his students. "I was in a room with more than 100 people and only seven noticed it," said the chairman of DePauw University's Computer Science Department. "They were spending all of their energy copying notes and couldn't think about what was going on." The experience as a graduate student in the mid-1980s at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute...
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BRIAN WILLIAMS Commentary: The heat will hurt more next winterRestricted Content

August 14, 2006
Geopolitical instability and increasing worldwide demand for fossil fuels have caused high energy prices. Indiana tax policies in support of the creation of ethanol and biodiesel production facilities are part of an effort to help wean our transportation infrastructure from fossil fuels. While ethanol may be a poor alternative to fossil fuels, Hoosier entrepreneurs' and policymakers' efforts in this area reflect a broad awareness that we need a sensible, comprehensive energy policy. A corollary to $3-per-gallon gas is increasing home-heating...
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  1. I never thought I'd see the day when a Republican Mayor would lead the charge in attempting to raise every tax we have to pay. Now it's income taxes and property taxes that Ballard wants to increase. And to pay for a pre-K program? Many studies have shown that pre-K offer no long-term educational benefits whatsoever. And Ballard is pitching it as a way of fighting crime? Who is he kidding? It's about government provided day care. It's a shame that we elected a Republican who has turned out to be a huge big spending, big taxing, big borrowing liberal Democrat.

  2. Why do we blame the unions? They did not create the 11 different school districts that are the root of the problem.

  3. I was just watching an AOW race from cleveland in 1997...in addition to the 65K for the race, there were more people in boats watching that race from the lake than were IndyCar fans watching the 2014 IndyCar season finale in the Fontana grandstands. Just sayin...That's some resurgence modern IndyCar has going. Almost profitable, nobody in the grandstands and TV ratings dropping 61% at some tracks in the series. Business model..."CRAZY" as said by a NASCAR track general manager. Yup, this thing is purring like a cat! Sponsors...send them your cash, pronto!!! LOL, not a chance.

  4. I'm sure Indiana is paradise for the wealthy and affluent, but what about the rest of us? Over the last 40 years, conservatives and the business elite have run this country (and state)into the ground. The pendulum will swing back as more moderate voters get tired of Reaganomics and regressive social policies. Add to that the wave of minority voters coming up in the next 10 to 15 years and things will get better. unfortunately we have to suffer through 10 more years of gerrymandered districts and dispropionate representation.

  5. Funny thing....rich people telling poor people how bad the other rich people are wanting to cut benefits/school etc and that they should vote for those rich people that just did it. Just saying..............

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