Education & Workforce Development

EYE ON THE PIE: Let's turn our children into assetsRestricted Content

August 15, 2005
Morton Marcus
Could we reduce some of the major costs in our society if we had fewer children and more immigration from abroad? Think about it. Children, particularly those 15 to 19 years of age, are a major disruptive and expensive aspect of our nation. They establish behaviors that lead to lifelong misery for themselves and expenses for the rest of us. Teens get into all sorts of costly trouble. They lead police on dangerous chases because they will not obey the...
More

Special Report: Buying blind: Lack of oversight leaves state in dark on real estate deals The state of Indiana knows how much it's spending to lease property statewide -nearly $40 million a year. But it doesn't know if that's too much.Restricted Content

August 15, 2005
Tammy Lieber
The state of Indiana knows how much it's spending to lease property statewide -nearly $40 million a year. But it doesn't know if that's too much. State contracts for third-party real estate services give government officials few safeguards to ensure they're paying a fair price for office, laboratory and storage space outside of state-owned buildings, those in the industry say. And state administrators have no control over seven-figure commissions paid to two Indianapolis real estate brokers in the past decade,...
More

Space crunch prompts Indiana to seek help with real estate leasing duties:Restricted Content

August 15, 2005
- Tammy
Between the Statehouse, the Indiana Government Center and the State Library building, the state of Indiana owns 1.1 million square feet of real estate in downtown Indianapolis. Still, that's not enough room to house all state government's agencies and functions-which is why Indiana spends nearly $17 million each year to lease space elsewhere in Marion County. Some agencies, including the departments of education and health, house nearly all their office workers in privately owned buildings near the Statehouse. Other departments...
More

TOM HARTON Commentary: Dragging parents back to classRestricted Content

August 15, 2005
The day he was hired in June, Indianapolis Public Schools Superintendent Eugene White broached a topic too often missing in the dialogue about public education. White said that parents are among those who will be held accountable for student achievement in Indianapolis Public Schools. The words "parents" and "accountable" might have shown up together on a school vocabulary test sometime in the last 100 years, but they don't often go together when those of us who aren't in the trenches...
More

Quiet approach drawing criticism: President's lack of visibility hurts IU, some complainRestricted Content

August 8, 2005
Andrea Muirragui
Never mind the Herculean task of leading the state's largest college system in a difficult economic climate; he knew that would be hard. But after two years of long weeks and late nights, he's facing a more surprising challenge-defending himself from critics who question his ability to get the job done. IU seems to be adrift, naysayers argue, and so far Herbert doesn't seem to be doing much to get it back on course. "It is with great regret that...
More

Defining success: Those who've tasted it share their thoughts on just exactly what 'it' isRestricted Content

August 8, 2005
How do you define career success? We posed that question to a variety of high-profile women and men in the Indianapolis business community. While the responses did confirm some of our preconceived notions-such as that men would mention financial rewards more often than women-there are far more similarities than differences, regardless of gender or profession. Still, "Career success is defined differently by each individual," as Alex Slabosky, president and CEO of The Healthcare Group, so wisely put it; and as...
More

Rising star in GOP recasts job agency: New chief uses secret shoppers, dress code to shake up state's work force developmentRestricted Content

August 8, 2005
Peter Schnitzler
Indiana Department of Workforce Development Commissioner Ronald Stiver says the world is flat, with the United States no longer having mountainous advantages over other nations. And Stiver knows Hoosiers must prepare for it to get even flatter. "You're talking to the converted," Stiver said. "I believe in the 21st century, the major lever for economic development will be work-force development." Stiver, 31, is reorganizing DWD with the new flat world in mind. He envisions an agency that moves beyond doling...
More

TAWN PARENT Commentary: It takes a village to save a marriageRestricted Content

August 1, 2005
Divorce is a costly proposition-for families, for the courts, for business and for society. And it's especially costly in Indianapolis. We have more divorced residents than any other major Midwestern city, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. As a result, companies suffer. Nationally, divorce costs companies an estimated $11 billion a year, according to the Sherman Oaks, Calif.-based Grief Recovery Institute, an educational foundation. Employees going through a divorce typically are confronting emotional, financial and legal challenges. In surveys of...
More

Event targets greener vehicles: Fleet operators to discuss emission-reduction methods at downtown conferenceRestricted Content

August 1, 2005
Chris O\'malley
More sparks have been flying from city garbage trucks lately than a City-County Council meeting over police and sheriff's department consolidation. Mechanics have been cutting out sections of garbage truck exhaust pipes and splicing in tubes filled with precious metals. When the "diesel oxidation catalyst" heats up, combustion gases blowing through it are cleansed before coming out the tailpipe. So simple and quick is this approach to curbing air pollution that John Chavez hopes the humble trash truck project will...
More

NOTIONS: Sex makes us more squeamish than violenceRestricted Content

August 1, 2005
Bruce Hetrick
Two decades ago, while creating an A I D S - p r eve n t i o n campaign for Connecticut's state health department, I became a "sexpert." No, I didn't become an expert on sex itself (at least no more than your average married fellow). Nor did I conduct formal sex research (I leave that to the Kinsey Institute). Instead, I became an expert on how we Americans, Puritan descendents that many of us are, resist communicating about...
More

Smaller-sized meetings bring in big bucks for city: Hospitality group sees value in events of all scalesRestricted Content

August 1, 2005
Tracy Donhardtreporter
Even event planners hire event planners. When Cynthia Howell needed to plan an event in the city for a state health care organization, she called Betsy Ward, a member of the meetings team at the Indianapolis Convention and Visitors Association. With what Howell calls minimal effort on her part, the Indiana Primary Health Care Association Inc. will stay in 50 rooms for two nights at the Sheraton Indianapolis Hotel and Suites at Keystone at the Crossing this fall. The group...
More

University Place getting major makeover: New owner IUPUI investing $13M in renovation of 18-year-old hotelRestricted Content

August 1, 2005
Scott Olson
A hotel built during an era in which Indianapolis first laid claim to its title of Amateur Sports Capital of the World has a new owner that is spending millions of dollars to bring the structure into the new century. University Place Conference Center & Hotel, on the campus of IUPUI, opened amid the fanfare of the Pan American Games hosted by Indianapolis in 1987. Nearly 4,500 athletes from 38 countries converged on downtown, including a throng of media that...
More

Bias claimed at Citizens Gas: Black workers: Test limited advancementRestricted Content

August 1, 2005
Chris O\'malley
Citizens Gas & Coke Utility is battling allegations that a test used to screen employees and outside job applicants was biased against blacks, hindering their chances of getting hired or advancing. The city-owned utility last year reached a confidential settlement with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission on behalf of applicants who weren't hired because the test "has an adverse impact on black employees and applicants for promotion, transfers and hire," according to EEOC documents. Now, that settlement-which included cash payouts...
More

VIEWPOINT: Arts education is not disposableRestricted Content

July 25, 2005
Helen H.
Our forefathers had it right. In planning for the eight symbols of Indiana's values that grace the high arches of the rotunda in the state capitol, art ranks right up there with commerce, justice, liberty, history, agriculture, oratory and law. Each of these is depicted in 20-foot statues that hold a color palette, a book or a shock of wheat that reveals in iconic form the tools of that particular area. Interesting to note that, without art, none of the...
More

Tax credits aid blighted areas: Help open to firms targeting Center Township projectsRestricted Content

July 25, 2005
Scott Olson
Federal tax credits supporting roughly $6 million in economic development projects are still available for small-business owners considering expanding or locating in Center Township. The funds are administered through the New Markets Tax Credit Program, which was established by Congress in 2000 to help revitalize blighted areas. In Indiana, the locally based Urban Enterprise Association Inc. helped secure tax credits that can fund $50 million worth of projects, including $12.5 million in Marion County. The tax credits already are supporting...
More

EYE ON THE PIE: Brothers set example for today's execsRestricted Content

July 25, 2005
Morton Marcus
Most of us know the fabled heroes of Bean Town. They include the Adams cousins (John and Sam). Paul Revere. The Kennedy brothers (John, Robert and Edward). Ted Williams, Carl Yazstremski, Bobby Orr, Bob Cousey, Bill Russell, Larry Bird and Tom Brady. Yet Boston's most significant business heroes are not well-known today, at a time when their example could be most useful. Two brothers, Edward and Lincoln Filene, inherited their father's department store in 1890. They spent the rest of...
More

Planner sinks his teeth into dentists' finances: Four Quadrant builds business around one industryRestricted Content

July 25, 2005
Ed Callahan
Dentists know a lot about operating a dental drill, but sometimes not so much about operating a business. That's where Four Quadrant Wealth Advisors likes to comes in. Indianapolis-based Four Quadrant provides its dental clients with financial advice on everything from running the money side of their practices to building their retirement funds. As one of a fairly small number of financial advice firms that focus on a single type of client, Four Quadrants limits its clients to dentists or...
More

Program hopes to boost women in science: IUPUI to put female science students under one roof to nurture their interest in field often dominated by menRestricted Content

July 18, 2005
Tracy Donhardtreporter
The "girls aren't good at science" myth still exists, according to many science educators. That is why a new School of Science program at IUPUI hopes to do its part to dispel the label many say is created as early as elementary school. IUPUI's Women in Science House will literally house together women studying science, providing a nurturing environ ment for female students who often feel isolated, a factor that can cause them to change majors, said Pam Crowell, director...
More

VIEWPOINT: Hoosiers gave tech transfer a big boostRestricted Content

July 18, 2005
Cam Carter
Today, we take for granted that our state universities play a role far beyond their traditional educational mission-especially in the economic arena. University-sponsored research is being licensed to the private sector, or used to form new companies. Universities are managing business incubators. Consulting partnerships between academia and industry are commonplace. It wasn't always this way. Not long ago, university officials were skeptical of becoming too involved with the private sector. Business leaders and investors didn't recognize the value of innovation...
More

Music events seeking rhythm: Midwest Music Summit picks up the beat for industry convention expected to draw 23,000Restricted Content

July 18, 2005
Andrea Muirragui
The Midwest Music Summit is approaching its fifth year bigger than ever as organizers fine-tune an event they hope will find harmony with a massive convention planned for the same weekend. More than 400 artists are slated to perform at 35 venues throughout the city during the July 21-23 summit-scheduled this year to coincide with International Music Products Association's NAMM Summer Session, an annual gathering expected to draw 23,000 music aficionados for its first stop in Indianapolis. The timing is...
More

Diversity marketing gains steam in central Indiana: Ad agencies helping convey cultural revelancyRestricted Content

July 11, 2005
Anthony Schoettle
Ethnic or diversity marketing, once confined to major cities such as Dallas, New York and Los Angeles, is taking hold in Indianapolis. "We have seen a gradual but growing response among clients to communicate to a multicultural audience," said Clyde Bodkin, president of locally based Bodkin Associates Inc. "Not everyone is in the same place, but smart companies are finding culturally sensitive, culturally relevant ways to communicate to their target markets." Diversity marketing is the fastest-growing sector of Bodkin's 14-person...
More

Degree combines medicine, business: IU grads put in 5 years to earn combo MD/MBARestricted Content

July 11, 2005
Katie Maurer
Tell people you have your MD and they'll likely be impressed. Tell them you also have an MBA-well, now you're just showing off. For four recent Indiana University graduates, however, impressing others had nothing to do with their decision to pursue simultaneous medical and business degrees. It's all about making their way in the increasingly complicated field of health care, where being a good doctor is about more than having the highest grades in medical school. The four students received...
More

Historic battle settled: Prairie pact lays out plans without judging past practicesRestricted Content

July 11, 2005
Andrea Muirragui
But whatever Earlham College puts in the 41-year history of credits and debits, it will have no bearing on the resolution of a decades-long dispute over control of the Hamilton County attraction. That deal is largely done. Carter and Earlham board Chairman Mark B. Myers ended nearly two years of negotiation July 5, putting quill-topped ballpoint to paper in front of a cheering crowd in the museum's Welcome Center. The agreement-which frees Conner Prairie from Earlham's control and calls for...
More

Education programs provide job opportunities: Career Connections aims to curb turnover at entry levelRestricted Content

July 11, 2005
Tracy Donhardtreporter
When Luvinia Hollis moved to Indianapolis from Kentucky about five years ago, the then-42-year-old had few skills, so landing a job was difficult. She lived with her sisters and got some help from her ex-husband, but trying to make ends meet on $100 a week was nearly impossible. "It was so horrible for me, you wouldn't believe," Hollis said. She worked odd jobs for the next few years, making barely more than minimum wage. Eventually, she found her way to...
More

SPORTS: NBA's delayed-entry rule, Michelin's move and moreRestricted Content

July 4, 2005
Bill Benner
So much news, so little space. Item: The NBA and its players' association enter into a new collective bargaining agreement that will increase the age for draft eligibility to 19, or to one year after an athlete's high school class has graduated. Reaction: Perhaps the NBA and its players' association believed they were tossing those involved in college basketball a bone by raising the age limit. If so, it is a bone that likely will stick in the throats of...
More
Page  << 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 >> pager
Sponsored by
ADVERTISEMENT

facebook - twitter on Facebook & Twitter

Follow on TwitterFollow IBJ on Facebook:
Follow on TwitterFollow IBJ's Tweets on these topics:
 
Subscribe to IBJ
  1. I had read earlier this spring that Noodles & Co was going to open in the Fishers Marketplace (which is SR 37 and 131st St, not 141st St, just FYI). Any word on that? Also, do you happen to know what is being built in Carmel at Pennsylvania and Old Meridian? May just be an office building but I'm not sure.

  2. I'm sorry, but you are flat out wrong. There are few tracks in the world with the history of IMS and probably NO OTHER as widely known and recognized. I don't care what you think about the stat of Indy Car racing, these are pretty hard things to dispute.

  3. Also wondering if there is an update on the Brockway Pub-Danny Boy restaurant/taproom that was planned for the village as well?

  4. Why does the majority get to trample on the rights of the minority? You do realize that banning gay marriage does not rid the world of gay people, right? They are still going to be around and they are still going to continue to exist. The best way to get it all out of the spotlight? LEGALIZE IT! If gay marriage is legal, they will get to stop trying to push for it and you will get to stop seeing it all over the news. Why do Christians get to decide what is moral?? Why do you get to push your religion on others? How would legalizing gay marriage expose their lifestyle to your children? By the way, their lifestyle is going to continue whether gay marriage is legalized or not. It's been legal in Canada for quite a while now and they seem to be doing just fine. What about actual rules handed down by God? What about not working on Sundays? What about obeying your parents? What about adultery? These are in the 10 Commandments, the most important of God's rules. Yet they are all perfectly legal. What about divorce? Only God is allowed to dissolve a marriage so why don't you work hard to get divorce banned? Why do you get to pick and choose the parts of the Bible you care about?

  5. Look at the bright side. With the new Lowe's call center, that means 1000 jobs at $10 bucks an hour. IMS has to be drooling over all that disposable income. If those employees can save all their extra money after bills, in five years they can go to the race LIVE. Can you say attendance boost?

ADVERTISEMENT