Education & Workforce Development

SPORTS: Let me count the ways sports enrich education 264 494 281 512202 511 232 527284 494 301 512278 511 301 527234 511 257 527Other columnists tackle education topics. PAGES 8,9,12,28& 38Restricted Content

January 9, 2006
Bill Benner
Other columnists tackle education topics. PAGES 8,9,12,28& 38 There is a school of thought that the pursuits of sports and education are somehow mutually exclusive. Short of that, certainly there are those who believe sports are overemphasized in relation to education and, in terms of expenditures, every dollar spent on sports is a dollar somehow taken away from education. In Indiana, Our Man Mitch Daniels, the governor, has been critical of local school boards for approving the construction of athletic...
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Daniels' team shakes up pension fund for teachers: Retirement plan may risk more on private equityRestricted Content

January 9, 2006
Peter Schnitzler
Under Gov. Mitch Daniels, Indiana is renewing its commitment to making sure teachers receive their pensions. But in the process, the state may also put their pension principal at greater risk. State Budget Director Chuck Schalliol said the $7.5 billion Indiana State Teachers' Retirement Fund is considering expanding its holdings in private equity. The enormous pension fund already allocates 5 percent of its assets, or $240 million, toward such investments, which include venture capital, real estate and leveraged buyouts. Highly...
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CHRIS KATTERJOHN Commentary: Early learning is key to successRestricted Content

January 9, 2006
It was encouraging to see Gov. Mitch Daniels and Indiana Superintendent of Education Suellen Reed team up recently to offer a plan by which school districts might share resources to free up extra money that could pay for more teachers and classroom resources. One option suggested for the freed-up funds was statewide fullday kindergarten. While multiple uses for the money can be found, it's clear an emphasis on kindergarten is a good way to go, as most experts now agree...
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Schools push financial literacy: Programs teach students the importance of investments, how Wall Street worksRestricted Content

January 9, 2006
Tracy Donhardt
Fourth-graders at Crooked Creek Elementary School recently made $250 by making poinsettia-topped pens and selling them to parents and teachers. Middle school students at Thomas Carr Howe Academy learn the value of putting a few dollars away each week, so the mind-set of compounded savings will be instilled before they grow older. And, last month, a team of high school students from Fort Wayne won a statewide stock-market-simulation contest by growing a hypothetical $100,000 investment 55 percent in 10 weeks....
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Education, work force key hurdles to new economy:Restricted Content

January 2, 2006
Mark Miles
Having recently returned to Indiana after a 15-year absence, I see a region filled with both challenges and opportunities. The Central Indiana Corporate Partnership, the organization I've returned to serve as president and CEO, is focused on long-term economic prosperity for our region. To this end, our people are our most valuable resource. Unfortunately, central Indiana faces a significant challenge in making our human capital match our goal of a knowledgebased, 21st-century economy. Indiana ranks 46th in the educational attainment...
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STATEHOUSE DISPATCH: Short legislative session may be eventful, for a changeRestricted Content

January 2, 2006
Ed Feigenbaum
We've all become lulled into assuming that the so-called "short" session of the Indiana General Assembly in the even-numbered years is the political equivalent of the practice of medicine: First, do no harm. In election years, lawmakers are reluctant to do much beyond that which they must do to protect public health, safety and treasury. The short session originated as a vehicle for handling emergencies arising between the odd-numbered-year budget sessions, and many legislators-particularly those seeking re-election-didn't see much cause...
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In the new year, building on the successes of 2005:Restricted Content

January 2, 2006
Bart Peterson
This past year was one of the most active and successful in our city's history. We pushed through legislation to fund an expansion of the Indiana Convention Center and build a new multi-purpose stadium, both of which will be tremendous boons to our region's economy, pumping in more than $2.25 billion in investment and creating more than 4,200 permanent jobs over the next 10 years. In addition, through the leadership of the governor and legislature, a one-of-a-kind regional funding solution...
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EYE ON THE PIE: Cost of living depends on how you liveRestricted Content

December 26, 2005
Morton Marcus
"You can find warmer," I said, "but I'm not sure you'll find nicer anywhere." "Well, if you don't want to go, I could go myself," Myrtle pouted. "I could be a muse anywhere; it's a transferable skill and I don't need a license to practice. I'd just find some nice writers or artists in another place, or even offer inspiration over the Internet." "How much do you make a year, Myrtle?" I asked. "None of your business," she said curtly....
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NEWSMAKER Outspoken White takes charge at IPS:Restricted Content

December 26, 2005
-Chris O\'malley
NEWSMAKER Outspoken White takes charge at IPS Eugene White ruffled more than a few feathers early this year when he publicly called Gov. Mitch Daniels "a liar." White, then the superintendent of Washington Township schools, didn't care for Daniels' claim that the state's school administrators cared more about building projects than education. Like him or not, White doesn't mince words. He has a stand-up style that this summer helped him land the job of superintendent of Indianapolis Public Schools. The...
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RETURN ON TECHNOLOGY Tim Altom: Here is list of the worst tech foibles of 2005Restricted Content

December 26, 2005
Well, happy holidays again, my brethren! It's once more time for my holiday gift to you, a compendium of technological disasters that test the assertion that we're happiest when we read about those who have been more humiliated than we were. As military pilots used to say about their own missteps, "Man, that'll leave a crater." The most recent example in this hall of horrors is Mizuho Securities, as reported by CNN Dec. 9. Massive, Tokyo-based Mizuho switched two numbers...
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TAWN PARENT Commentary: Do libraries need gun control?Restricted Content

December 19, 2005
My first job, at age 15, was shelving books in my neighborhood library. Those were the days of tidy card catalogs with brass-handled drawers and hand-stamped "date due" cards tucked into the back of books. There wasn't a computer in the place. Times have changed. Libraries now enable people without other Internet access to go online to research health problems, tap into business databases, find information for school projects, locate needed social services, and even apply for jobs. A recent...
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ERODING FOUNDATION: Endowment's assets fall with Lilly stock; heavy sale of shares dim chances for reboundRestricted Content

December 12, 2005
Scott Olson
Endowment's assets fall with Lilly stock; heavy sale of shares dim chances for rebound Wall Street is chipping away at Indianapolis' most-venerable philanthropic institution. The value of Lilly Endowment's primary asset-Eli Lilly and Co. shares-has dropped by more than half since 2000, forcing leaders to sell additional shares in order to give away hundreds of millions of dollars as required each year. Still, the privately run endowment remains a major Eli Lilly shareholder, with nearly 148 million shares of the company's...
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EYE ON THE PIE: Security depends on flexibility, not stabilityRestricted Content

December 12, 2005
Morton Marcus
In one word, what do we want? I suggest that word is security, physical and financial security. We want to live without fear for our lives or our livelihoods. The atrocities of 9/11 made Americans more fearful about their physical security than they had been since the early days of World War II. Our economic condition feels insecure as jobs drift to other nations, as health care costs soar, and as both public and private pension plans are threatened. To...
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ISO program gets high marks:Restricted Content

December 5, 2005
An Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra program that incorporates art and music into elementary schools benefits students and teachers, according to an independent study released this month. ISO's School Partnership Program is in its sixth year. In the program, ISO and the schools collaborate to create lesson plans and curricula incorporating the arts into classrooms and core subject areas. The study, performed by Robert Horowitz, associate director of the Center for Arts Education Research at Teachers College, Columbia University, evaluated progress at...
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Property taxes could dominate session: Lawmakers face difficult chore of addressing flaws in market-assessment systemRestricted Content

December 5, 2005
Peter Schnitzler
Indiana has been struggling for more than a decade to move its property tax system to a market value standard. Expect the property tax reform debate to take center stage once again in the 2006 Indiana General Assembly. "The more things change, the more they stay the same," said Karl Berron, vice president of the Indiana Association of Realtors. There are some who would like to scrap the property tax system entirely and replace it with some other form of...
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Health care: big problem for small business: Wyoming lawmaker's proposed legislation could end 10-year Senate impasse on controversial solutionRestricted Content

November 28, 2005
Matthew Kish
More than 45 million Americans lack health insurance. And more than half of them are employed or dependent on someone who works for a small business, according to the National Federation of Independent Business. It's a big problem-especially in Indiana. Between 2000 and 2004, 5.6 percent of Hoosier workers lost employer-provided health care, according to the Economic Policy Institute. That's a higher percentage than any state except Wisconsin. Legislation just introduced in Congress by Wyoming Sen. Michael Enzi, however, may...
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Hispanic market his target: Ponce Publicidad founder focuses on fast-growing demographic groupRestricted Content

November 28, 2005
Anthony Schoettle
The Bank of Central America is moving into Florida and other parts of the southeast United States. While this development might not seem significant for central Indiana business operators, Roberto Ponce thinks it's a sign. "The burgeoning Hispanic market within the U.S. is becoming a major factor," said Ponce, president of Indianapolis-based Ponce Publicidad. "If domestic businesses don't realize that and reach out to this segment, others from beyond our borders will." Ponce thinks his firm is uniquely positioned to...
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Fine-tuning a business strategy: Local violinmaker finds success by raising pricesRestricted Content

November 28, 2005
Matthew Kish
F ine-tuning a business strategy Local violinmaker finds success by raising prices John Welch made a counterintuitive business decision two years ago. The violin business was in decline. Asian manufacturers were turning out high-quality stringed instruments for a fraction of the price of their American competitors. Welch decided to swim against the current. He raised prices. "We realized the only way to compete with the Chinese was to improve our quality," said Welch, CEO of Indianapolis-based Sofia Violins. "We realized...
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Merry Realty Inc.: Big plans for small firm Real estate agency tries to win business by teaching buyers rules of the gameRestricted Content

November 21, 2005
Ed Callahan
Real estate agency tries to win business by teaching buyers rules of the game Large agencies may dominate the residential real estate game, but Indianapolis-based Merry Realty is trying to prove a small player still can make a big name for itself. For years, Merry Realty has focused its efforts on properties in Indianapolis, but it is rapidly expanding into a more diverse market, targeting booming areas like Hamilton County while staying loyal to its inner-city roots. Real estate broker...
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VIEWPOINT Valerie Eickmeier: Business needs to harness power of artsRestricted Content

November 21, 2005
VIEWPOINT Valerie Eickmeier Business needs to harness power of arts Indiana will more fully reach its potential in economic development for the 21st century when its common goal is to build a community where commerce and creativity can thrive. The world is entering an era some business leaders and economists are calling the "Conceptual Age." They trace the economic growth of our country from agriculture to industrial manufacturing, technology and the Information Age. Today, our country's primary economic growth and...
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ITT Educational Services rebounds from federal probe: With stock at 52-week high, company plans growthRestricted Content

November 21, 2005
Scott Olson
After rebounding from a federal criminal probe that uncovered no wrongdoing, ITT Educational Services Inc. is proceeding with an ambitious growth plan in hopes of building upon a bullish earnings run. The U.S. Attorney's Office in Houston, which led the investigation into whether the Carmel-based private provider of postsecondary degree programs had falsified student records, acknowledged in June that it did not turn up evidence justifying the charges. "It was very, very disruptive and very distracting to the organization," ITT...
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MASTER OF THE PLAN: Ultra-prepared president has Purdue primed for 'pre-eminence'Restricted Content

November 14, 2005
Peter Schnitzler
It's half-past eight on a Monday morning and Martin Jischke is at his desk, poring over notes. This is how Purdue University's president spends his days and most of his nights-preparing to be prepared. At any time, Jischke could be interacting with students, alumni, faculty, legislators or business leaders. He wants to be ready for their questions with clear, articulate answers, no matter the subject. His responses seem off-thecuff, but make no mistake: Jischke has studied and considered his position...
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What's up with kids (us) today? CHRIS KATTERJOHN Commentary:Restricted Content

November 14, 2005
News flash: Many kids today show little respect for or fear of authority, or anything else for that matter. Did you catch Ruth Holladay's Nov. 8 column in The Indianapolis Star about the vandalized deer sculpture on the DePauw University campus? A life-size sculpture of an eightpoint buck was created by New York artist Marc Swanson and donated to the school by the Butler Family Foundation at a cost of five figures. It was a beautiful piece of public art,...
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ECONOMIC ANALYSIS: We need to push harder to foster a tech economyRestricted Content

November 14, 2005
Patrick Barkey
You have to give the folks at Techpoint, the advocacy group for technology-oriented business in Indiana, plenty of credit for stamina. For eight years, these f o r wa r d - l o o k i n g folks have been carefully measuring the state's progress in what was once called the high-tech economy. And for each of those eight years, the message has been depressingly consistent: We remain at the back of the pack. That's not for lack...
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State revamps I-Light expansion project: Funding restored, but network limited to universitiesRestricted Content

November 14, 2005
Scott Olson
Indiana Gov. Mitch Daniels has given high-speed Internet project I-Light the green light, but with a twist from its original intent. He agreed this month to support the final stages of funding for the project, which began in 1999 and connected supercomputers at Indiana University, Purdue University and IUPUI. The aim was to expand Indiana's digital infrastructure by connecting 15 cities via a fiber-optic network. Under his directive, though, only universities and related research parks can tap into the network,...
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