Education & Workforce Development

Commentary: Every office should have a defibrillatorRestricted Content

July 28, 2008
Mickey Maurer
Tim Russert died last month at age 58. He was Washington bureau chief for NBC and the moderator of "Meet the Press." His physician, Michael Newman, described the cause of death as coronary thrombosis-sudden cardiac arrest. Russert's untimely death was possibly preventable. We can learn something here that may save lives at our businesses. Russert had been diagnosed with asymptomatic coronary artery disease that he controlled with medication and exercise. According to Newman, his stress test in April was normal....
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EYE ON THE PIE: Taking the con out of economicsRestricted Content

July 21, 2008
Morton Marcus
A marketing professor at the Kelley School of Business used to proclaim he could teach all one needed to know about economics in a week. That was back in the days when faculty would spend a few minutes of the morning hours in the coffee room engaged in friendly banter as well as serious discussion. The coffee room and my friend are both gone, but to me, a teacher of economics, the insult remains. Imagine-denigrating my calling, my faith, with...
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BEHIND THE NEWS: Steely-nerved investor double dips on ITT stockRestricted Content

July 21, 2008
Greg Andrews
Richard Blum is a former mountain climber who once led an Everest expedition. In his day job as a professional investor, he's almost as daring. Twice in the last four years, his San Francisco-based money-management firm, Blum Capital Partners, has bet big on locally based ITT Educational Services at times other investors were terrified of the stock. Blum, husband of Democratic U.S. Sen. Dianne Feinstein, began scooping up shares in the for-profit education company in February 2004-one day after federal...
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Carmel's play for the arts: Some fear it will come at Indianapolis' expenseRestricted Content

July 21, 2008
Chris O\'malley
The $80 million-plus Carmel Performing Arts Center, a neo-classical-styled concert hall designed to be an acoustical masterpiece, is still two years from opening. But it's already the source of some dissonance in the Indianapolis arts community to the tune of Mozart's String Quartet No. 19, in C major. On one hand, Indianapolis-area performing arts groups would sacrifice to theater god Dionysus for a chance to perform at the 1,600-seat music hall or at its adjacent 500-seat theater. But others fret...
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New Martin University president draws ire

July 21, 2008
Tracy Donhardt
In less than four months, new Martin University President Algeania Freeman said, she hit her two main objectives for the state's only predominantly black university: cut costs and increase fund raising. But her whirlwind of activity has not come without controversy.
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Angie's List CEO buys Greek church for opera: Arts group hopes Meridian-Kessler digs will help it growRestricted Content

July 14, 2008
Jennifer Whitson
Angie's List CEO Bill Oesterle has paid nearly $1.5 million to buy Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church in the Meridian-Kessler neighborhood and is renting it to the Indianapolis Opera to use as a multi-function center offering rehearsal space, classes and small performances. "I would have been hard-pressed to tell you much about the Indianapolis Opera before all of this. But I think they'll be great neighbors," said Oesterle, who lives on Washington Boulevard, directly north of the church parking lot....
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Fishers planning tech incubator: Town hires former IU Emerging Technology Center chief to lead biz parkRestricted Content

July 14, 2008
Peter Schnitzler
Fast-growing Fishers has the kind of assets economic developers dream about-strong schools, affordable housing and median family income of $81,971. Now the town wants to build on that foundation by adding a high-tech business park to its list of amenities. "Businesses are looking to come to a site where they can find employees with the requisite level of education and the ability to get additional education close by. Education is the key," said Fishers Town Council President Scott Faultless. "We...
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More firms adding diversity coordinators: Law practices, others see benefit to encouraging diverse workplaceRestricted Content

July 7, 2008
Scott Olson
Brita Horvath celebrated her first year on the job late last month as Baker & Daniels LLP's diversity and pro bono coordinator. Even in a part-time capacity, paying someone to tackle diversity issues within the workplace would have been unthinkable 30 years ago, recalls Greg Utken, a firm partner who co-chairs its diversity committee. "When I got out [of law school] in 1974, the firm I was with had no women and no people of color; it was white male,"...
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Commentary: Two worlds, one languageRestricted Content

July 7, 2008
Chris Katterjohn
Do you speak Chinese? I don't, but I had a great conversation with two non-English-speaking Chinese artists and educators last week. I was moderating a roundtable discussion at the governor's residence for Joyce Sommers and the Indianapolis Arts Center. The roundtable kicked off a two-month summer exhibit at the center called "Two Worlds, One Language through Art." (You can read more about the exhibit on page 37.) It was my first time as a moderator in a situation requiring the...
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SPORTS: Lamentations-and a recommendation-for old IURestricted Content

July 7, 2008
Bill Benner
Adam Herbert, who may go down as the sorriest presidential hire in the history of the Big Ten, is nowhere to be seen, those velvety crimson jumpsuits disappearing about the same time Sampson was shown the door. Certain members among the IU trustees-who so violated the trust part of their duties, first in hiring Herbert and then in bringing in Sampson-are not about to step up and take responsibility for their actions. I guess it will all come out some...
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VIEWPOINT: Business needs a different mind-setRestricted Content

July 7, 2008
Gregory P.
Daniel H. Pink, in his intriguing new book, "A Whole New Mind: Moving from the Information Age to the Conceptual Age," said, "The new era we are entering will be characterized by 'right brain' processes as opposed to the 'left brain' functioning of the more technical information age we're exiting. These days, left-brain functioning is being done more efficiently and effectively by computers." "Right-directed thinking," as Pink calls it, is uniquely human and is about design and interpersonal relationship. My...
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A&E: Chinese art from within and without

July 7, 2008
Lou Harry
This week, China art at the Indianapolis Art Center. And a famous scroll finds itself in remarkable company at the Indianapolis Museum of Art. Anyone who has set foot into the Indianapolis Art Center has bumped into the name Fehsenfeld. It is, after all, half the moniker of the center's Churchman-Fehsenfeld Gallery. And so I think some skepticism was to be expected when I heard that one of the two artistic worlds showcased in the Indianapolis Art Center's "Two Worlds,...
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RETURN ON TECHNOLOGY: Go ahead, let your employees work and play onlineRestricted Content

July 7, 2008
Tim Altom
On June 18, CNN (www.cnn.com) had a story about a study in CyberPsychology and Behavior Journal (www.liebertpub.com) that examined how people use the Internet for personal use at work. It was supposed to be eye-opening, but it wasn't to me. The study showed that managers who fret and make rules about Internet use by employees are probably using it themselves for the same purposes. Of course, no manager would ever let himself be seduced into wasting company time, would he?...
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Candidates surface for IU's athletic director jobRestricted Content

July 7, 2008
Anthony Schoettle
Well-known names are bubbling to the top as speculation heats up about who will replace embattled Indiana University Athletic Director Rick Greenspan and how much money the job will command. Greenspan announced June 26 that he'll step down at the end of the year. The decision came after the NCAA added to the list of charges facing IU's men's basketball program over rules violations under former Coach Kelvin Sampson.
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Simic leaving big shoes to fill at IU: Foundation leader will serve as president emeritus and stay involved with schoolRestricted Content

June 30, 2008
Tracy Donhardt
Curt Simic has spent 31 years as a student and in various positions at Indiana University. That's nearly half his life devoted to the Bloomington campus. So it's no surprise that Simic, 66, views his retirement as president of the IU Foundation-his most recent post and one he's held the past 20 years-with mixed emotions. While he's looking forward to having time to go bike riding-as a student in the early 1960s, Simic competed in the school's Little 500 Bicycle...
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EYE ON THE PIE: It's not just the economy, stupidRestricted Content

June 30, 2008
Morton Marcus
No doubt, the Daniels administration will trumpet the fact that Indiana was the ninth-fastestgrowing state in the first quarter of this year. That's right; personal income in the Hoosier state grew at an annual rate of 5.1 percent, while the nation advanced 4.6 percent. But, as noted by the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis, which generates these data, Indiana was among the fastergrowing states because of dramatic increases in the prices of corn and soybeans. North Dakota came in first,...
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Networks help practices extend their reach:Restricted Content

June 30, 2008
Scott Olson
Outside of Indiana, the local law firm of Bose McKinney & Evans LLP has a nominal presence in Washington, D.C., and Raleigh, N.C. Yet, the midsize practice with roughly 130 lawyers in Indianapolis is handling an immigration issue for a fellow firm in India and is encouraged about prospects in Argentina, Colombia and Puerto Rico. Global gigs typically are reserved for larger rivals with an international scope. But scores of firms that want to expand their reach, without the risk...
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United Way tries to make the grade with literacy program: Education initiatives showing early successRestricted Content

June 23, 2008
Tracy Donhardt
Last summer, the United Way of Central Indiana decided it needed to go to school. The not-for-profit concluded that to achieve its goal of building stronger communities, it needed to supplement its human-service initiatives with a comprehensive focus on early childhood development and elementary education. "Our board decided we needed to elevate what we're doing with schools and focus on root causes of why students don't succeed," said Ellen Annala, CEO of United Way. "If we don't invest now when...
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Commentary: It's all about managing diversityRestricted Content

June 23, 2008
Chris Katterjohn
"Diversity" is a word that gets thrown around a lot these days. The pair of words "diversity management" might be more to the point. Diversity really is a fact of life. In terms of humankind, the world is made up of different kinds of people. And those differences go way beyond race, gender and ethnicity. People come from different backgrounds, believe in different religions, and have different sexual preferences, for example. Some are physically handicapped or mentally impaired. Our differences...
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The daily lunch special? Life sciences information: Law firm, Indiana Health Industry Forum bringing industry players together for monthly presentationsRestricted Content

June 23, 2008
Katie Maurer
The phrase "Let's do lunch" has taken on a new meaning over the past five years in the Indiana life sciences community. Since 2003, a who's who of the biotechnology, medical device, pharmaceutical and other fields have gathered at the downtown law offices of Barnes & Thornburg LLP to meet and eat at the Life Sciences Lunch Series. A collaborative effort of the law firm and the Indiana Health Industry Forum, the monthly event provides a networking and education platform...
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Butler's pharmacy addition just what the doctor ordered: New $14M building will help college meet increasing demand for graduatesRestricted Content

June 23, 2008
Scott Olson
Mary Andritz, dean of Butler University's College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, bursts into laughter when asked how long her department's been short on space. "I've only been here for two years, but I think it's been for some considerable amount of time," she guessed. "Probably for 10 years." Lilly Endowment Inc., however, is filling the prescription in the form of a grant to fund a 40,000-square-foot addition under construction and scheduled to open by the fall 2009 semester. The...
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Big NCAA swim event might land in cityRestricted Content

June 23, 2008
Anthony Schoettle
The NCAA is considering bringing its men's and women's Division I, II and III championships together for one big festival of swimming, and the IUPUI Natatorium is a leading candidate to be the permanent site of the annual event.
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Ivy Tech ex-president repays $20,000 following audit of expensesRestricted Content

June 16, 2008
Tracy Donhardt
Retired Ivy Tech Community College President Gerald Lamkin has repaid nearly $20,000 after a review of the college foundation's expense-reimbursement policy uncovered bills that had been paid for him without proper documentation. College and foundation officials call the accounting lapse and Lamkin's inability to produce receipts for all the submitted expenses an "innocent oversight" and have implemented a revised policy with tighter controls.
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Flagship rises over post-GM town: Incubator has helped preserve automotive talent base, foster diverse businessesRestricted Content

June 16, 2008
Chris O\'malley
ANDERSON - Along Interstate 69, in a new industrial building with side-windows covered in paper to foil prying eyes, Altair Nanotechnologies is perfecting a ceramic oxide battery with three times the power of a conventional lithium battery. Up the road, Comfort Motion Technologies has written software to make a car's power seat jiggle ever so subtly, to keep one's back, butt and thighs comfortable on long drives. And everybody is keeping an eye on Pete Bitar, whose green laser device...
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Commentary: Smart policies can lengthen livesRestricted Content

June 9, 2008
Brian Williams
Over the last 20 years, life expectancy for residents of the United States as a whole has increased steadily. However, recent studies by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services have shown that not all Americans are enjoying longer, healthier lives. The implications of these studies are particularly ominous for Hoosiers. The disparities in life expectancy are most pronounced between richer and poorer Americans, reflecting the pronounced growth of income inequality the last two decades. In 1980, the most...
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  1. The $104K to CRC would go toward debts service on $486M of existing debt they already have from other things outside this project. Keystone buys the bonds for 3.8M from CRC, and CRC in turn pays for the parking and site work, and some time later CRC buys them back (with interest) from the projected annual property tax revenue from the entire TIF district (est. $415K / yr. from just this property, plus more from all the other property in the TIF district), which in theory would be about a 10-year term, give-or-take. CRC is basically betting on the future, that property values will increase, driving up the tax revenue to the limit of the annual increase cap on commercial property (I think that's 3%). It should be noted that Keystone can't print money (unlike the Federal Treasury) so commercial property tax can only come from consumers, in this case the apartment renters and consumers of the goods and services offered by the ground floor retailers, and employees in the form of lower non-mandatory compensation items, such as bonuses, benefits, 401K match, etc.

  2. $3B would hurt Lilly's bottom line if there were no insurance or Indemnity Agreement, but there is no way that large an award will be upheld on appeal. What's surprising is that the trial judge refused to reduce it. She must have thought there was evidence of a flagrant, unconscionable coverup and wanted to send a message.

  3. As a self-employed individual, I always saw outrageous price increases every year in a health insurance plan with preexisting condition costs -- something most employed groups never had to worry about. With spouse, I saw ALL Indiana "free market answer" plans' premiums raise 25%-45% each year.

  4. It's not who you chose to build it's how they build it. Architects and engineers decide how and what to use to build. builders just do the work. Architects & engineers still think the tarp over the escalators out at airport will hold for third time when it snows, ice storms.

  5. http://www.abcactionnews.com/news/duke-energy-customers-angry-about-money-for-nothing

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