Education & Workforce Development

Commentary: Indiana law chases away talentRestricted Content

September 8, 2008
Mickey Maurer
The Wellness Community of Central Indiana was established in 1995 as a not-for-profit organization to provide free support, education and hope to individuals and families affected by cancer. At The Wellness Community, cancer patients can share experiences and lend one another encouragement informally or through programs facilitated by professional counselors. The Wellness Community also provides a haven to grieve together in those instances when cancer is the ultimate victor. Today, the folks at The Wellness Community are grieving over a...
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NOTIONS: A pregnant GOP primer on civil liberties: Who decides?Restricted Content

September 8, 2008
Bruce Hetrick
Years ago, I wrote an article about Sheila Suess Kennedy, an Indianapolis author who'd written a book called "What's a Nice Republican Girl Like Me Doing in the ACLU?" I didn't know Sheila. I didn't know much about the American Civil Liberties Union, either. So I stopped by her office (she directed the organization's Indiana chapter back then) for an education. Sheila, now a faculty member at the Indiana University School of Public and Environmental Affairs at IUPUI, explained to...
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Experts: Building boom not over: Big projects wind down, but new ones fill pipelineRestricted Content

September 8, 2008
Scott Olson
The completion of $2 billion in city construction projects has left a gaping hole in contractor job schedules-as wide as when the roof opens at Lucas Oil Stadium. Even so, industry leaders remain optimistic about staying busy despite the combination of a tepid economy and the end of a local boom that stretched the limits of the labor pool. The $1.1 billion airport midfield terminal project, the $715 million stadium and $150 million Central Library expansion helped to create so...
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Web site aims to help diversify work force: 70 199 233 220Diversity-One.comgetting push from Radio OneRestricted Content

September 8, 2008
Anthony Schoettle
One of the city's largest advertising agencies and a down-state software development firm have brokered a deal with Radio One Indianapolis to launch a Web site that matches minority job seekers with companies looking to diversify their work force. The site, Diversity-One.com, is the product of MZD Advertising and Batesville-based Employment Partners, a firm specializing in Web-based employee and job-search software. The partners in the project wanted a local niche site to compete with national job and employee search portals...
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An unorthodox design: Massive church construction project in Carmel features unique architectureRestricted Content

September 8, 2008
Scott Olson
The golden dome that sits atop Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church under construction in Carmel provides a curious sight for those in central Indiana. But what is even more unusual about the massive structure underneath the dome is a Sixth Century Byzantine design like no other in the world. "There's no design like this in history, and it's never been built before," said San Francisco architect Christ [pronounced Chris] Kamages, designer of the church. His CJK Design Group specializes in...
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ECONOMIC ANALYSIS: Marriage has some economic consequencesRestricted Content

September 1, 2008
Mike Hicks
This month marks my parents' 50th wedding anniversary. And, at the risk of being labeled a hopeless unromantic, I thought I might reflect on some of the economic consequences of marriage. I'll begin with taxes. Until 1969, when my parents celebrated their 11th anniversary, the federal income tax had no marriage penalty. In fact, from its inception in 1913 until then, married couples enjoyed a modest tax advantage (two deductions on the same income provided a small edge over singles)....
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VOICES FROM THE INDUSTRY: China, higher education and our economic futureRestricted Content

September 1, 2008
Mark Miles
In mid-September, I'll be traveling to China's Liaoning province as part of a delegation led by Indiana State University, hosted by Liaoning University. We'll arrive in the country too late for the Olympics, but we'll be there to talk about another form of global competition-economic development. It's appropriate that the two universities are co-hosting a conference on economic development issues, given the importance of human capital in our economy. It's especially appropriate for China, where higher education has become a...
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Ivy Tech cooking up plans for more culinary space: Growing program hopes to build $7 million school at Glick CenterRestricted Content

September 1, 2008
Scott Olson
Popular television cooking shows such as "Iron Chef," "Emeril Live," "Top Chef" and, dare we mention, "Hell's Kitchen," have brought the interest in culinary careers to a boil. To help meet demand locally, Indiana Business College opened a Chef's Academy downtown nearly two years ago. Now, Ivy Tech Community College is expanding its existing program by building a culinary school in Indianapolis at the Gene B. Glick Junior Achievement Education Center on North Keystone Avenue. Enrollment in Ivy Tech's two-year...
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Firm helps area high schools sell themselvesRestricted Content

August 25, 2008
Anthony Schoettle

Continental Enterprises, an intellectual property consulting firm, launched a service this summer to help area high schools register their logos, names and mascots as trademarks and establish licensing programs, assuring that schools will get a cut of all merchandise sales bearing their mark. This month, North Central High School, one of the state's largest, signed with Continental, and six to eight more schools are expected to follow suit within 60 days.


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IUPUI faces tough decisions over aging sports facilitiesRestricted Content

August 18, 2008
Anthony Schoettle

From 1979 to 1982, IUPUI inherited three world-class athletic facilities that have since hosted Olympic trials and world-record performances by top-flight amateur and professional athletes. But that inheritance has turned into a financial albatross around the university's neck. It's grappling with how to pay for their upkeep and the improvements necessary to keep the facilities--and the city--in the hunt for high-profile sporting events.


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VIEWPOINT: Recruiting: If you lie down with dogs ...Restricted Content

August 18, 2008
Jon Ford
The recent episode involving former IU basketball coach Kelvin Sampson underscores how badly broken is our system of recruiting and qualifying top leaders. Reference checks by highly paid professional recruiters failed to turn up the true nature of this leader. Yes, we all were aware of his lack of character at the University of Oklahoma, but were there signs of this lack of character in his past at Montana Tech or Washington State University? One would hope the recruiters went...
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Divisive U of I business school dean departsRestricted Content

August 18, 2008
Chris O'Malley

Six current and former University of Indianapolis professors who in late 2006 alleged business school dean Mitch Shapiro violated hiring practices and created a hostile work environment got what they wanted last month.

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VIEWPOINT: Recruiting: If you lie down with dogs ...Restricted Content

August 18, 2008
Jon Ford
The recent episode involving former IU basketball coach Kelvin Sampson underscores how badly broken is our system of recruiting and qualifying top leaders. Reference checks by highly paid professional recruiters failed to turn up the true nature of this leader. Yes, we all were aware of his lack of character at the University of Oklahoma, but were there signs of this lack of character in his past at Montana Tech or Washington State University? One would hope the recruiters went...
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Commentary: Let's invest in criminal justiceRestricted Content

August 11, 2008
Brian Williams
Indianapolis has spent more than $2 billion on worthy civic projects such as the new airport terminal, Lucas Oil Stadium, and a new Central Library. The same sense of civic pride must be mobilized for funding improved criminal justice. Strong, coherent mayoral leadership is required to address the causes of increased criminal activity here, but a lasting solution requires a community-wide effort. Criminal activity is not simply the result of an individual's motivation to offend. For crime to occur, the...
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Commentary: Energy woes need quick, lasting fixRestricted Content

August 11, 2008
Mickey Maurer
Last month, the front page of The Wall Street Journal featured 25-yearold Saeed Khouri, who paid at auction the equivalent of $14 million of our increasingly worthless American dollars for a license plate bearing "1." His cousin, Talal Khouri, threw in $9 million in pocket change for tag "5" to tool around Abu Dhabi in his Rolls Royce. Get this, the Khouris declined to be interviewed because they didn't want to be the center of attention. I am not particularly...
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Commentary: Please copy this columnRestricted Content

August 4, 2008
Chris Katterjohn
(In deference to '60s radical Abbie Hoffman and his 1971 cult paperback "Steal This Book," I hereby relinquish our copyright to this column and give you permission to copy it. I'll tell you what to do with it later.) Silly me, I thought Mitch Daniels had really shaken things up and done a great job in his first four years as governor. To hear his Democratic opponents in the upcoming election tell it, you'd think he had provided uninspired leadership...
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A&E: On stage, the kids are alright

August 4, 2008
Lou Harry
Last year, American Cabaret Theatre's young adult production of "High School Musical" was, well, a very good high school musical. If you happened to be talked into going because your niece was in the cast, you would have had a surprisingly good time. This year ACT's young adult "The Wiz" (running through Aug. 17) is similar. If this were a high school show, you'd be amazed at the vocal talent. If you approached it as children's theater, you'd be impressed...
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Commentary: Every office should have a defibrillatorRestricted Content

July 28, 2008
Mickey Maurer
Tim Russert died last month at age 58. He was Washington bureau chief for NBC and the moderator of "Meet the Press." His physician, Michael Newman, described the cause of death as coronary thrombosis-sudden cardiac arrest. Russert's untimely death was possibly preventable. We can learn something here that may save lives at our businesses. Russert had been diagnosed with asymptomatic coronary artery disease that he controlled with medication and exercise. According to Newman, his stress test in April was normal....
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EYE ON THE PIE: Taking the con out of economicsRestricted Content

July 21, 2008
Morton Marcus
A marketing professor at the Kelley School of Business used to proclaim he could teach all one needed to know about economics in a week. That was back in the days when faculty would spend a few minutes of the morning hours in the coffee room engaged in friendly banter as well as serious discussion. The coffee room and my friend are both gone, but to me, a teacher of economics, the insult remains. Imagine-denigrating my calling, my faith, with...
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BEHIND THE NEWS: Steely-nerved investor double dips on ITT stockRestricted Content

July 21, 2008
Greg Andrews
Richard Blum is a former mountain climber who once led an Everest expedition. In his day job as a professional investor, he's almost as daring. Twice in the last four years, his San Francisco-based money-management firm, Blum Capital Partners, has bet big on locally based ITT Educational Services at times other investors were terrified of the stock. Blum, husband of Democratic U.S. Sen. Dianne Feinstein, began scooping up shares in the for-profit education company in February 2004-one day after federal...
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Carmel's play for the arts: Some fear it will come at Indianapolis' expenseRestricted Content

July 21, 2008
Chris O\'malley
The $80 million-plus Carmel Performing Arts Center, a neo-classical-styled concert hall designed to be an acoustical masterpiece, is still two years from opening. But it's already the source of some dissonance in the Indianapolis arts community to the tune of Mozart's String Quartet No. 19, in C major. On one hand, Indianapolis-area performing arts groups would sacrifice to theater god Dionysus for a chance to perform at the 1,600-seat music hall or at its adjacent 500-seat theater. But others fret...
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New Martin University president draws ire

July 21, 2008
Tracy Donhardt
In less than four months, new Martin University President Algeania Freeman said, she hit her two main objectives for the state's only predominantly black university: cut costs and increase fund raising. But her whirlwind of activity has not come without controversy.
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Angie's List CEO buys Greek church for opera: Arts group hopes Meridian-Kessler digs will help it growRestricted Content

July 14, 2008
Jennifer Whitson
Angie's List CEO Bill Oesterle has paid nearly $1.5 million to buy Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church in the Meridian-Kessler neighborhood and is renting it to the Indianapolis Opera to use as a multi-function center offering rehearsal space, classes and small performances. "I would have been hard-pressed to tell you much about the Indianapolis Opera before all of this. But I think they'll be great neighbors," said Oesterle, who lives on Washington Boulevard, directly north of the church parking lot....
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Fishers planning tech incubator: Town hires former IU Emerging Technology Center chief to lead biz parkRestricted Content

July 14, 2008
Peter Schnitzler
Fast-growing Fishers has the kind of assets economic developers dream about-strong schools, affordable housing and median family income of $81,971. Now the town wants to build on that foundation by adding a high-tech business park to its list of amenities. "Businesses are looking to come to a site where they can find employees with the requisite level of education and the ability to get additional education close by. Education is the key," said Fishers Town Council President Scott Faultless. "We...
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More firms adding diversity coordinators: Law practices, others see benefit to encouraging diverse workplaceRestricted Content

July 7, 2008
Scott Olson
Brita Horvath celebrated her first year on the job late last month as Baker & Daniels LLP's diversity and pro bono coordinator. Even in a part-time capacity, paying someone to tackle diversity issues within the workplace would have been unthinkable 30 years ago, recalls Greg Utken, a firm partner who co-chairs its diversity committee. "When I got out [of law school] in 1974, the firm I was with had no women and no people of color; it was white male,"...
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  1. How much you wanna bet, that 70% of the jobs created there (after construction) are minimum wage? And Harvey is correct, the vast majority of residents in this project will drive to their jobs, and to think otherwise, is like Harvey says, a pipe dream. Someone working at a restaurant or retail store will not be able to afford living there. What ever happened to people who wanted to build buildings, paying for it themselves? Not a fan of these tax deals.

  2. Uh, no GeorgeP. The project is supposed to bring on 1,000 jobs and those people along with the people that will be living in the new residential will be driving to their jobs. The walkable stuff is a pipe dream. Besides, walkable is defined as having all daily necessities within 1/2 mile. That's not the case here. Never will be.

  3. Brad is on to something there. The merger of the Formula E and IndyCar Series would give IndyCar access to International markets and Formula E access the Indianapolis 500, not to mention some other events in the USA. Maybe after 2016 but before the new Dallara is rolled out for 2018. This give IndyCar two more seasons to run the DW12 and Formula E to get charged up, pun intended. Then shock the racing world, pun intended, but making the 101st Indianapolis 500 a stellar, groundbreaking event: The first all-electric Indy 500, and use that platform to promote the future of the sport.

  4. No, HarveyF, the exact opposite. Greater density and closeness to retail and everyday necessities reduces traffic. When one has to drive miles for necessities, all those cars are on the roads for many miles. When reasonable density is built, low rise in this case, in the middle of a thriving retail area, one has to drive far less, actually reducing the number of cars on the road.

  5. The Indy Star announced today the appointment of a new Beverage Reporter! So instead of insightful reports on Indy pro sports and Indiana college teams, you now get to read stories about the 432nd new brewery open or some obscure Hoosier winery winning a county fair blue ribbon. Yep, that's the coverage we Star readers crave. Not.

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