Education & Workforce Development

Court reporters in short supply: School closings lead to openingsRestricted Content

June 25, 2007
Scott Olson
Tom Richardson credits fictional defense attorney Perry Mason and the climactic trials on the long-running television series for prompting him to become a court reporter more than 30 years ago. But the romance of participating in a high-profile court case or deposition and translating riveting testimony seems to be lost on the younger set. Industry experts say the dwindling number of licensed court reporters and the closure of a number of court-reporting schools have mired the profession in a severe...
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Commentary: Chasing after the younger crowdRestricted Content

June 25, 2007
Chris Katterjohn
A couple of weeks ago, I ate lunch with an attorney friend who was telling me about his eldest daughter-born, raised and now living in Indianapolis. A 27-year-old registered nurse, she was preparing to move to Chicago because she thinks "there is nothing to do here" for people her age. This really hit home for me because I have two daughters in the same age range living here, and both are starting to talk about moving away for a while,...
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Bigger not best for all: drophead Many attorneys find greener pastures in smaller practices after leaving major firmsRestricted Content

June 25, 2007
Scott Olson
not Bigger leaving best for red all tape drophead Many attorneys find greener pastures in smaller practices after leaving major firms When lawyers Debra Miller and James Fisher fled legal powerhouse Ice Miller LLP and the prestigious partner status they had earned, their stable of coworkers swiftly sank from nearly 250 to none. Yet 15 months later, after the pair left the largest law firm in the city, they say they're quite content practicing together at Miller & Fisher LLC,...
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Philanthropy center busting assumptions: Institute's research shows there's still much to learnRestricted Content

June 18, 2007
Chris O\'malley
The Center on Philanthropy at Indiana University plans to share more of its prolific research through two new courses to be tested this fall in Indianapolis, and launched here and elsewhere next spring. Both new courses, including one on the dynamics of women's giving, could be a gold mine for perpetually prospecting not-for-profits-and for wealth advisers and wealth managers. "We're hoping there could be some niches we can carve out in this area. There's a great thirst for knowledge," said...
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Symbol of YWCA's past may soon get new owner: Women's organization carries on without building; new mission focused on scholarships, mentoringRestricted Content

June 18, 2007
Chris O\'malley
The former home of the YWCA is about to change hands, but even without its own building, the organization once known for housing women plans to grow its scholarship programs and support other not-for-profits that advocate for women's issues. The 4460 Guion Road facility is under contract to be sold "and we expect to close on it shortly," said Greg Lynn, vice president of real estate for the Central Indiana Community Foundation. Lynn said he could not elaborate on the...
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Reaching the Pinnacle: Local women forge a path to the top in health care managementRestricted Content

June 11, 2007
Julie Vincent
Local women forge a path to the top in health care management Health care is the second-fastest-growing sector of the U.S. economy, employing more than 12 million workers, according to the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. Women make up nearly 80 percent of the health care work force, and increasingly they're moving into the executive ranks. Locally, St. Vincent Indianapolis Hospital, Riley Hospital for Children and Noblesville's Riverview Hospital all have women at the helm. And women hold top...
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VOICES FROM THE INDUSTRY: Despite the doomsayers, manufacturing still mattersRestricted Content

June 11, 2007
John Layden
From a manufacturing perspective, the United States in the 21st century is a curious place. In 1950s, science promised us the day when high-technology advances would perfrom a whole range of mundane work, thus releasing humanity to the pursuit of more noble intellectual and fulfilling activities. A half-century later, much of that promise-at least from the technology side-has been fulfilled. Yet, curiously, when the natural evolution of the free market affects U.S. manufacturing, all manner of handwringing and doom-saying emerge....
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PROFILE: KARLA SNEEGAS: Clearing the murky air ITPC director leads charge toward smoke-free IndianaRestricted Content

June 11, 2007
Della Pacheco
PROFILE KARLA SNEEGAS Clearing the murky air ITPC director leads charge toward smoke-free Indiana Karla Sneegas is primed for battle. With the fervor of an ancient Crusader, this pint-sized warrior is fighting a "just war" to reduce Indiana's addiction to tobacco as executive director of the Indiana Tobacco Prevention and Cessation agency. At 4 feet, 11 inches, Sneegas is well-prepared for all foes. She's armed with knowledge learned as a public health professional and as former director of South Carolina's...
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Autism's rise challenges local agencies: Those with disorder face difficulties in locating meaningful employmentRestricted Content

June 4, 2007
Tracy Donhardt
Experts haven't pinpointed the exact reason, but they do know one thing-the rate at which children are being diagnosed with autism has been rising. About one child in 150 is diagnosed by the age of 8 with autism or a related autism spectrum disorder such as Asperger's syndrome, according to a recent study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. That rate is up about 10 times from the 1980s. Experts have a variety of theories to explain the...
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ECONOMIC ANALYSIS: Taking the ultimate step in K-12 accountabilityRestricted Content

June 4, 2007
Patrick Barkey
Everyone in business today knows that customers have choices, and that making and keeping customers happy with your product has always been a big part of the game. These days dissatisfied customers have many more options than simply walking away-they can go online and blast your product in cyberspace, attacking the image and reputation you may have spent a lifetime trying to build. That's the daunting prospect American businesses face every day. Yet as difficult as that sounds, here's one...
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Agriculture goes urban: New academy plans to show city students that there's more to horticulture than farmingRestricted Content

June 4, 2007
Scott Olson
Indiana's stature as one of the nation's top producers of corn and soybeans is as enduring as the fertile farmland in which the crops are grown. But a new initiative plans to introduce urban high school students in Indianapolis to a bushel of opportunities within the agriculture industry that extends well beyond farming. The Hoosier Agribusiness and Science Academy is a partnership between state government and Ivy Tech Community College in which students from the Lawrence Early College High School...
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Service drives education software maker: Angel Learning quickly weathers PR setbackRestricted Content

June 4, 2007
Peter Schnitzler
When The Indianapolis Star reported on its front page in mid-May that Indianapolis Public Schools had accidentally exposed thousands of private student records online, it was a potentially enormous public relations setback for locally based education software maker Angel Learning. Angel Learning had provided the software, and CEO Christopher Clapp said he immediately asked staffers to send explanation emails to all 300 of his customers. They then followed up with phone calls. He wanted to assuage clients' worries right away....
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ITT's youthful CEO has large shoes to fillRestricted Content

June 4, 2007
Tracy Donhardt
Kevin Modany, CEO of ITT Educational Services Inc., carries an iPod and downloads drum solo videos from YouTube. But when Modany, a young-looking 40-year-old, talks about ITT's 35-percent increase in first-quarter profit, he comes across as savvy and confident of his ability to take the post-secondary education provider to even greater heights.
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D'Amico responds through lawyer to being snubbedRestricted Content

May 28, 2007
Chris O'Malley
Carol D'Amico has been publicly silent since the board passed over her for president of Ivy Tech Community College in March. But a letter her attorney dashed off a day after the vote says she deemed neither of the finalists for the job qualified and the selection process ripe for a lawsuit.
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RETURN ON TECHNOLOGY: Is techno-speak making your mind spin?Restricted Content

May 28, 2007
Tim Altom
A BBC online story from November got me thinking about funny looks. I get those a lot, and not just because most mornings I look like a poorly repaired sidewalk. I get them because of the words I use. But I can't help it. Nobody in technology can help it. When we talk about technology, we always sound like we're mumbling jargon, even when we're not. The article (news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/business/6118828.stm) dealt with the frustration workers have with supposedly cool business jargon,...
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NOTIONS: From a father to his sons upon their graduationRestricted Content

May 28, 2007
Bruce Hetrick
Dear Austin and Zach: Well, my sons, it's milestone week: your last day of high school; your 19th birthday; your mom and stepdad's move to new digs designed for you as occasional guests rather than fulltime residents. Next up: "Pomp and Circumstance," forgettable oratory and lots of unsolicited advice. And, of course, your big reward for 12 years of educational servitude: You get to move a tassel from the right to the left side of a rented mortar board. Inevitably,...
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VOICES FROM THE INDUSTRY: Infrastructure is costly to improve, but costlier to ignoreRestricted Content

May 21, 2007
Don Altemeyer
A recent article in Strategy+business magazine estimated that "the world's urban infrastructure needs a $41 trillion makeover" between now and 2030. The article explained that $41 trillion is roughly equivalent to the "2006 market capitalization of all shares held in all stock markets in the world." Some experts think that "new technology" will be the answer, and it may be when nanotechnology takes over the world. For now, however, the trend usually reinforces the trend, and we do the same...
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VOICES FROM THE INDUSTRY: Creation of state officer reconfirms value of GISRestricted Content

May 21, 2007
Jim Sparks
Virtually unnoticed in the spate of bills that emerged from the 2007 session of the Indiana General Assembly was creation of a new officer in state government who can be extremely helpful in the state's economic development efforts. The law creating a Geographic Information Officer, or GIO, gives official status to an important discipline that has been blossoming over the last 25 years and is increasingly relied upon in business and political decision-making. A Geographic Information System is a collection...
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Techpoint honors Indiana companies, educators: Judges narrow 80 nominees to 13 Mira winnersRestricted Content

May 21, 2007
Peter Schnitzler
This year's recipients of Techpoint's Mira awards include some of the area's best-known technology startups as well as lower-profile firms that have racked up big achievements. On May 18, the technology trade group was scheduled to acknowledge the accomplishments of Hoosier entrepreneurs in information technology, life sciences, advanced manufacturing and education with its eighth annual gala at the Indiana Roof Ballroom downtown. "It's always good to recognize companies and give them a pat on the back, put them on the...
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Welding school's custom curriculum gains notice: Institution counts on business-to-business contactsRestricted Content

May 21, 2007
Anthony Schoettle
Seeking to take advantage of a growing statewide welder shortage, the area's first school specializing in advanced welding opened this month. Photon School of Welding Inc. Director Charles Garinger and a silent partner have invested more than $300,000 to open the school at West 84th Street and Zionsville Road. The operation is financed through the founders' savings and a loan from National City Bank. It opened this month in a 6,000-squarefoot facility with a capacity of 52 welding booths. Many...
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Initiative aims at more minority participation: Construction group says current strategy not workingRestricted Content

May 21, 2007
Scott Olson
More needs to be done to improve minority involvement in the construction industry than simply employing a certain percentage of the companies on projects. That's the consensus of the Indiana Construction Roundtable, an organization made up of some of the biggest users and providers of construction services. Its diversity outreach initiative aims to increase minority participation within the trades by rewarding contractors who support education and training, employ minorities and women, and mentor small minority- and women-owned businesses. The initiative...
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Group training for national dash: Not-for-profit wants to take race beyond hometownRestricted Content

May 21, 2007
Chris O\'malley
A 2-1/2-year-old Indianapolis not-forprofit that funds melanoma education and research through an annual race hopes to extend its footprint around the country. Outrun the Sun Inc. has had preliminary talks with a race management firm in Los Angeles, said co-founder and Executive Director Anita Day. Los Angeles is the headquarters of Neutrogena, which recently agreed to sponsor Outrun the Sun's annual race. Momentum to take the organization national also picked up this year when it landed Shape magazine and Subaru...
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TeePee could rise again: Local man hopes to revive restaurant that was city fixture from 1930s to '70sRestricted Content

May 21, 2007
Cory Schouten
Dick Turner is looking for an entrepreneur who shares his taste for nostalgia and Big Chief cheeseburgers. For 20 years, he has dreamed of opening an updated version of the classic TeePee restaurants that served as hangouts for generations from the 1930s to 1970s. At its peak, the chain had three Indianapolis locations, each with dining rooms and curb service, on Madison Avenue and Fall Creek Boulevard and in Nora. Turner can show you the frayed legal documents that outline...
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Award-winning financial planner not ready for retirement: Cooke, sons gain notice for helping well-heeled clientsRestricted Content

May 14, 2007
Scott Olson
As veteran financial planner John Cooke rehashes the highlights of his venerable career, it's evident that nothing can top the experience of working with his two sons. Close behind, though, are the accolades he's picked up along the way, including several mentions in various publications as one of the nation's top advisers. The latest recognition comes from Barron's magazine, in which Cooke is the only money manager in Indianapolis to make its list of the nation's top 100 brokers. His...
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CHRIS KATTERJOHN Commentary: A word to the generally assembledRestricted Content

May 14, 2007
Like everyone else who's interested in these sorts of things, I have my opinions about the recently completed 2007 session of the Indiana General Assembly. Considering how long it took lawmakers to get on track, they accomplished some reasonably important business when it got down to the wire. Aside from the all-important balanced budget, tops on my list is the 44-cent increase in the cigarette tax. It should've been higher, but this will do for a start. For all you...
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  1. A couple of issues need some clarification especially since my name was on the list. I am not sure how this information was obtained and from where. For me, the amount was incorrect to begin with and the money does not come to me personally. I am guessing that the names listed are the Principal Investigators (individual responsible for the conduct of the trail) for the different pharmaceutical trials and not the entity which receives the checks. In my case, I participate in Phase II and Phase III trials which are required for new drug development. Your article should differentiate the amount of money received for consulting, for speaking fees, and for conduct of a clinical trial for new drug development. The lumping of all of these categories may give the reader a false impression of physicians just trying to get rich. The Sunshine Law may help to differentiate these categories in the future. The public should be aware that the Clinical Trial Industry could be a real economic driver for Indiana since these revenues supports jobs and new job creation. Nationally, this account for 10-20 billion which our State is missing out on to a large degree. Yes, new drug and technology development has gotten most of the attention (e.g. CTSI, BioCrossroads, etc.) However, serious money is being left on the table by not participating in the clinical trials to get those new drugs and medical devices on the market!!!! I guess that this is not sexy enough for academia.

  2. The address given for the Goldfish Swim Club is the Ace Hardware, is it closing?

  3. Out of state management and ownership. If Kite controlled it, everything would be leased. Of course, due to the roundabout, there is limited access to the south side of 116th now also. Just have to go down to the light.

  4. Hey smudge, You're opposed to arresting people for minor crimes? Sounds great! We should only focus on murders and such, right? Let's stand around and wait until someone shoots someone before we act. Whatever we do, we should never question anyone, frisk anyone, or arrest anyone unless they are actively engaged in shooting or stabbing. Very sound!

  5. You guys are being really rude to gays in the comments. (Not all of you, I presume). You need to stop it. Gays have just as much of a right to marry as straight people do. It's not fair how you guys are denying them equal rights. They're acting more human than you'll ever be. We obviously haven't matured since the bible was last updated. Hate the sin, not the sinner. You've all committed a sin at least once in your life. You've lied, you've stolen, etc. (Those are just possibilities). We should have a planet for people that support gay rights and a planet for people that don't. Then, gay people could get married without you bigots interfering with their love life. How would you feel if straights couldn't get married? How would you feel if teenagers were afraid to come out to their parents as straight? If straight people got hate everywhere they went? If straight people were afraid to go out in public, because they feared being judged? It's never going to happen at the rate society is going. You haven't seen the side of me where I act obscene. You're glad my inner demon hasn't been released. I would, but oh no, my comment would be removed because of my very strong emotions about this subject. I love gays, and love how they show their affection for each other. I just ADORE how a state is going to give same-sex couples a marriage license, then changes their mind. (I was obviously being sarcastic there). I just LOVE how society thinks gays are an abomination to our society. You're caring about marriage between two men or two women. That's a small thing. Just grow up, and let them marry. Let them live their lives. You can't make them change their sexuality. You can't make them change their lifestyle. In my opinion, gays are more than welcome to marry. Please, grow up and realize that people should be allowed to marry, even if it's same-sex marriage. You guys are saying that "the bible said gay marriage is wrong." Well, guess what else is wrong? Read Matthew:7 and you'll find out. (I am in no way breaking that. I am saying a fact). I'm stating that gays have just as much of a right to marry as straights do. (:

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