Education & Workforce Development

NOTIONS: A property tax sigh of relief and a reform wish listRestricted Content

July 23, 2007
Bruce Hetrick
The nightstand clock reads 5:17. Too early to wake up. But hey, I've been tossing and turning for hours, so why lie here any longer, pretending? The cause for this night's insomnia is money. Money for two kids starting college. Money to replace the Money to paint the house. Money for employees' salaries. Money for employees' parking. Money for employees' retirement. Money for employees' health insurance. Money for their families' health insurance. Money to get the yellow highway paint off...
More

Scientific work experience gives attorneys a boost: Lab knowledge helpful in intellectual property workRestricted Content

July 23, 2007
Jennifer Mehalik
At first thought, people might assume most attorneys have undergraduate degrees in political science or criminal justice. And while many do, those with backgrounds in engineering, chemistry, physics, and other sciences are being drawn more and more to law because of the growth of interest from businesses in intellectual property. Some IP attorneys decided to take the leap from working in the science world to the legal one, and those who did it say their time working in a lab...
More

EYE ON THE PIE: Health care and the pursuit of happinessRestricted Content

July 16, 2007
Morton Marcus
Some people believe the Fourth of July grants them liberty to disturb the night with their firecrackers. My pursuit of happiness is in conflict with theirs and I want them jailed. We all gladly infringe on the liberties of others while in pursuit of our own happiness. For example, should motorcyclists wear helmets? Yes, if all of us expect to pay their hospital bills (through higher premiums) and maintain them on disability after they have head injuries that might be...
More

PROFILE TINA MOE: Persistence paid off for local business owner Tenacious accountant shares with clients valuable lessons she learned from the school of hard knocksRestricted Content

July 9, 2007
Della Pacheco
Moe's path to opening Indianapolisbased ACT Services Inc., her accounting, tax and consulting firm, was fraught with roadblocks. In 1998 she graduated from the Indiana University Kelley School of Business in Indianapolis with a degree in accounting. That same year she divorced. Moe has had her share of breakups. While still an undergraduate, the Greenwood native worked for a year as a business partner with a certified public accountant at Accounting Store LLC in Speedway. The partnership continued for five...
More

Commentary: We need a sensible alcohol policyRestricted Content

July 9, 2007
Brian Williams
The recent bust at the home of former Colts quarterback Jack Trudeau, and his subsequent arrest for allegedly hosting a party where high school students consumed alcohol, reflects current law in Indiana. But it does not reflect the attitudes of some toward the appropriate age at which one is capable of making fully informed decisions about alcohol use. More important, it reflects the fractured nature of how the law views an adult and the rights and responsibilities associated with adulthood....
More

State beefs up incentives available to tech companies:Restricted Content

July 9, 2007
Scott Olson
Companies receiving a Phase 1 SBIR match from the state need to apply for second-stage funding by July 20. Applications can be downloaded on the IEDC Web site. The proposal for funds should be no longer than 12 pages and include a commercialization plan describing how the product would be moved to market and any challenges that would need to be overcome. The proposal also should include a budget describing the funds required for The Indiana Economic Development Corp. has...
More

Snyder crams for job as Ivy Tech presidentRestricted Content

July 9, 2007
Tracy Donhardt
In the three months since being named president of Ivy Tech Community College, Tom Snyder has read up on the school's history and held meetings with 4,000 faculty, students and others to gain insight into the school. He's also made decisions about hiring, cost-cutting and student services.
More

WEDJ one year later: Ratings more than double: Revenue growth pushes Hispanic station toward recordRestricted Content

July 9, 2007
Anthony Schoettle
After years languishing as a ratings bottom feeder, WEDJ-FM 107.1 is quickly moving up the radio charts with its Hispanic format and is positioned to crack the market's top 10 stations. Since local radio veteran Russ Dodge was hired as general manager in late April 2006, WEDJ's rating for area listeners 12 and older has more than doubled, from 1.0 to 2.1, according to New York-based Arbitron Co. WEDJ's morning show is ranked No. 3 with listeners ages 18 to...
More

PROFILE: Piano Solutions Inc.: Shop singing piano's praises Shop owners want to give community an arts educationRestricted Content

July 9, 2007
Julie Young
Piano Solutions Inc. Shop singing piano's praises Shop owners want to give community an arts education Piano Solutions Inc. owners Greg Durthaler and Brian Hostetler like to think they're in tune with the music industry-all the better to help their clients. The key (so to speak) is to offer a full range of products and services. "Today, we offer tuning, moving and storage of pianos while carrying an array of method books, print music and piano accessories," Durthaler said. "We...
More

Happily ever after?: How to avoid the roadblocks to financial securityRestricted Content

July 9, 2007
Beth Laplante
Happily e ver after? How to avoid the roadblocks to financial security In her new book, "The Feminine Mistake," author Leslie Bennetts cautions women to seriously consider the financial consequences of exiting the workplace to be a stayat-home wife and mom. The former journalist and Vanity Fair writer says "few intelligent people would sink a lot of money into refurbishing a rental, but stay-athome wives think nothing of subordinating their own financial interests to those of their husbands, blithely assuming...
More

City steps up effort to help immigrants: Mayor's wife spearheading program to better acclimate newcomersRestricted Content

July 2, 2007
Scott Olson
The burgeoning number of immigrants arriving in Indianapolis have a new source available to help them navigate unfamiliar surroundings and the kaleidoscope of social support systems available. The Immigrant Welcome Center is a program launched in October that uses volunteers dubbed "natural helpers" to link foreign newcomers to such basic needs as health care, government and transportation services. Although the effort is nearly 9 months old, it's just now getting up to speed as organizers are interviewing candidates to lead...
More

Commentary: Hedda gives a searing Civic reviewRestricted Content

July 2, 2007
Mickey Maurer
I cede my column this week to Hedda Hopper, a Hollywood gossip columnist. Hopper died in 1966, but she agreed to come back again to review the Indianapolis Civic Theater benefit performance. HEDDA HOPPER'S HOLLYWOOD-Just detrained in Hoosierland to catch the Indianapolis Civic Theatre benefit. Charlie Morgan played Ed Sullivan in a sendup titled "A Really Big Shooow." Sullivan, your career is safe. Morgan, general manager and vice president of Cumulus radio stations in Indy, was stiffer than Charlie McCarthy....
More

'Find your niche ':Restricted Content

June 25, 2007
-Andrea Muirragui
His goal was to provide the proverbial one-stop shop, a place where "honey do" lists got done. Before long, he realized he may not have been aiming high enough. It seemed homeowners with not-so-handy honeys weren't the only customers interested in what Schneller was selling. He also got calls from real estate agents who needed some last-minute home repairs completed before a sale could close. "They came to us with a laundry list of items," Schneller said, ticking off an...
More

Court reporters in short supply: School closings lead to openingsRestricted Content

June 25, 2007
Scott Olson
Tom Richardson credits fictional defense attorney Perry Mason and the climactic trials on the long-running television series for prompting him to become a court reporter more than 30 years ago. But the romance of participating in a high-profile court case or deposition and translating riveting testimony seems to be lost on the younger set. Industry experts say the dwindling number of licensed court reporters and the closure of a number of court-reporting schools have mired the profession in a severe...
More

Commentary: Chasing after the younger crowdRestricted Content

June 25, 2007
Chris Katterjohn
A couple of weeks ago, I ate lunch with an attorney friend who was telling me about his eldest daughter-born, raised and now living in Indianapolis. A 27-year-old registered nurse, she was preparing to move to Chicago because she thinks "there is nothing to do here" for people her age. This really hit home for me because I have two daughters in the same age range living here, and both are starting to talk about moving away for a while,...
More

Bigger not best for all: drophead Many attorneys find greener pastures in smaller practices after leaving major firmsRestricted Content

June 25, 2007
Scott Olson
not Bigger leaving best for red all tape drophead Many attorneys find greener pastures in smaller practices after leaving major firms When lawyers Debra Miller and James Fisher fled legal powerhouse Ice Miller LLP and the prestigious partner status they had earned, their stable of coworkers swiftly sank from nearly 250 to none. Yet 15 months later, after the pair left the largest law firm in the city, they say they're quite content practicing together at Miller & Fisher LLC,...
More

Philanthropy center busting assumptions: Institute's research shows there's still much to learnRestricted Content

June 18, 2007
Chris O\'malley
The Center on Philanthropy at Indiana University plans to share more of its prolific research through two new courses to be tested this fall in Indianapolis, and launched here and elsewhere next spring. Both new courses, including one on the dynamics of women's giving, could be a gold mine for perpetually prospecting not-for-profits-and for wealth advisers and wealth managers. "We're hoping there could be some niches we can carve out in this area. There's a great thirst for knowledge," said...
More

Symbol of YWCA's past may soon get new owner: Women's organization carries on without building; new mission focused on scholarships, mentoringRestricted Content

June 18, 2007
Chris O\'malley
The former home of the YWCA is about to change hands, but even without its own building, the organization once known for housing women plans to grow its scholarship programs and support other not-for-profits that advocate for women's issues. The 4460 Guion Road facility is under contract to be sold "and we expect to close on it shortly," said Greg Lynn, vice president of real estate for the Central Indiana Community Foundation. Lynn said he could not elaborate on the...
More

Reaching the Pinnacle: Local women forge a path to the top in health care managementRestricted Content

June 11, 2007
Julie Vincent
Local women forge a path to the top in health care management Health care is the second-fastest-growing sector of the U.S. economy, employing more than 12 million workers, according to the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. Women make up nearly 80 percent of the health care work force, and increasingly they're moving into the executive ranks. Locally, St. Vincent Indianapolis Hospital, Riley Hospital for Children and Noblesville's Riverview Hospital all have women at the helm. And women hold top...
More

VOICES FROM THE INDUSTRY: Despite the doomsayers, manufacturing still mattersRestricted Content

June 11, 2007
John Layden
From a manufacturing perspective, the United States in the 21st century is a curious place. In 1950s, science promised us the day when high-technology advances would perfrom a whole range of mundane work, thus releasing humanity to the pursuit of more noble intellectual and fulfilling activities. A half-century later, much of that promise-at least from the technology side-has been fulfilled. Yet, curiously, when the natural evolution of the free market affects U.S. manufacturing, all manner of handwringing and doom-saying emerge....
More

PROFILE: KARLA SNEEGAS: Clearing the murky air ITPC director leads charge toward smoke-free IndianaRestricted Content

June 11, 2007
Della Pacheco
PROFILE KARLA SNEEGAS Clearing the murky air ITPC director leads charge toward smoke-free Indiana Karla Sneegas is primed for battle. With the fervor of an ancient Crusader, this pint-sized warrior is fighting a "just war" to reduce Indiana's addiction to tobacco as executive director of the Indiana Tobacco Prevention and Cessation agency. At 4 feet, 11 inches, Sneegas is well-prepared for all foes. She's armed with knowledge learned as a public health professional and as former director of South Carolina's...
More

Autism's rise challenges local agencies: Those with disorder face difficulties in locating meaningful employmentRestricted Content

June 4, 2007
Tracy Donhardt
Experts haven't pinpointed the exact reason, but they do know one thing-the rate at which children are being diagnosed with autism has been rising. About one child in 150 is diagnosed by the age of 8 with autism or a related autism spectrum disorder such as Asperger's syndrome, according to a recent study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. That rate is up about 10 times from the 1980s. Experts have a variety of theories to explain the...
More

ECONOMIC ANALYSIS: Taking the ultimate step in K-12 accountabilityRestricted Content

June 4, 2007
Patrick Barkey
Everyone in business today knows that customers have choices, and that making and keeping customers happy with your product has always been a big part of the game. These days dissatisfied customers have many more options than simply walking away-they can go online and blast your product in cyberspace, attacking the image and reputation you may have spent a lifetime trying to build. That's the daunting prospect American businesses face every day. Yet as difficult as that sounds, here's one...
More

Agriculture goes urban: New academy plans to show city students that there's more to horticulture than farmingRestricted Content

June 4, 2007
Scott Olson
Indiana's stature as one of the nation's top producers of corn and soybeans is as enduring as the fertile farmland in which the crops are grown. But a new initiative plans to introduce urban high school students in Indianapolis to a bushel of opportunities within the agriculture industry that extends well beyond farming. The Hoosier Agribusiness and Science Academy is a partnership between state government and Ivy Tech Community College in which students from the Lawrence Early College High School...
More

Service drives education software maker: Angel Learning quickly weathers PR setbackRestricted Content

June 4, 2007
Peter Schnitzler
When The Indianapolis Star reported on its front page in mid-May that Indianapolis Public Schools had accidentally exposed thousands of private student records online, it was a potentially enormous public relations setback for locally based education software maker Angel Learning. Angel Learning had provided the software, and CEO Christopher Clapp said he immediately asked staffers to send explanation emails to all 300 of his customers. They then followed up with phone calls. He wanted to assuage clients' worries right away....
More
Page  << 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 >> pager
Sponsored by
ADVERTISEMENT

facebook - twitter on Facebook & Twitter

Follow on TwitterFollow IBJ on Facebook:
Follow on TwitterFollow IBJ's Tweets on these topics:
 
Subscribe to IBJ
ADVERTISEMENT