Education & Workforce Development

Museums trip out over loyal donors: Cultural organizations are offering travel opportunities to generous patrons to inform them, gain more supportRestricted Content

September 11, 2006
Scott Olson
With a new director in place and a $74 million renovation and expansion complete, the next step for the Indianapolis Museum of Art is courting donors to financially back the enlarged operations. Those who pledge at least $2,500 to the IMA are invited to accompany, at their own expense, IMA Director Maxwell Anderson and his wife on a cruise in the fall of 2007 to Spain, France and Italy. The excursion coincides with the opening next year of the museum's...
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BRIAN WILLIAMS Commentary: Downtown needs a grand, artful facilityRestricted Content

September 11, 2006
On Sept. 1, 45 competitors from nearly 20 countries arrived for the seventh quadrennial International Violin Competition of Indianapolis. Through the middle of September at venues around the city, these talented men and women will compete for one of the richest artistic prizes in the world. In a few short months, the American Pianists Association will undertake its biennial competition for the Cole Porter Jazz Fellowship. Again, a cadre of some of the instrument's most accomplished American performers will come...
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Young architect honored for design of orphanage: Cluster complex plan wins international competitionRestricted Content

September 4, 2006
Jennifer Whitson
Chunsheh Teo is a driven man. The 28-year-old sometimes works long days as an architectural graduate at Ratio Architects Inc. and spends his off time building furniture for the home he and his wife recently purchased in Irvington. On a recent weekend, he built a new fence for the yard. Oh, and he also enters international design competitions in his down time-about seven in the last three years. "It's just kind of a fun thing to do," Teo said. At...
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St. Vincent makes bigger investment in charity care: Need drives construction of Primary Care Center set to open in mid-2007Restricted Content

August 28, 2006
Tom Murphy
Here's a lesson they don't teach in business school: Take an entity that loses $4 million annually and expand it 50 percent. That's the plan St. Vincent Indianapolis Hospital unveiled earlier this month when it broke ground on a new, larger Primary Care Center serving indigent, underinsured and uninsured patients. That population of poor, mostly Spanish-speaking patients has more than doubled its annual visits since 2000. St. Vincent officials say the new $4 million center is 10 years overdue. Their...
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Culinary training gains popularity as restaurant boom continuesRestricted Content

August 28, 2006
Victoria D. Williams
Indiana Business College will launch a Chef's Academy downtown next month, offering an 18-month program intended to produce trained "culinarians." Ivy Tech Community College, meanwhile, is looking for space to expand its two-year culinary arts program, which has seen explosive growth.
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Racing toward a new type of learning center: Decatur, Panther team up on educational facilityRestricted Content

August 28, 2006
Scott Olson
Mention a career in motorsports to most youngsters and they imagine whizzing around the track like NASCAR's Tony Stewart or Sam Hornish Jr., points leader of the Indianapolis Racing League. But a partnership between Indianapolisbased Panther Racing LLC and Decatur Township Schools wants to introduce students to more practical professions within the sport by providing the resources in a hands-on learning environment. The result is the Panther Education Center, set to open next fall near the racing team's headquarters at...
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NOTIONS: Has our love for labor been lost?Restricted Content

August 28, 2006
Bruce Hetrick
Bruce Hetrick is on vacation this week. In his absence, this column, which appeared on Sept. 1, 2003, is being reprinted. The Labor Days of my memory are happy-sad affairs. The weather is muggy. The family's gathered at some park or pond, river or lake. Burgers sizzle on the grill. Frisbees fly through the air. And after supper, there's touch football with dads and brothers, kids and cousins, until dusk drops her shadowy curtain on yet another summer. In my...
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PROFILE FIRST JURY INC.: Practice makes perfect Local trial consultants aim to help lawyers prepare for litigationRestricted Content

August 28, 2006
Susan Raccoli
PROFILE FIRST JURY INC. Practice makes perfect Local trial consultants aim to help lawyers prepare for litigation Blame the name. Attorneys could be forgiven if they thought hiring Indianapolis-based First Jury Inc. would get them advice on choosing a jury sympathetic to their clients' cause. But its staff won't tell them to avoid the woman with her arms crossed or the man who won't make eye contact. Instead, they'll assemble a jury of their own and stage a mock trial,...
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Woman sets sights on freedom: Disability isn't keeping shop owner from goalRestricted Content

August 28, 2006
Candace Beaty
Two doors opened for Pam Evans on Aug. 5-one to her own clothing store and the other to her independence. The Cherry Shop represents both to Evans, who lost most of her sight over the course of a weekend in 1998 to a genetic eye disease called angioid streaks. Left with only her peripheral vision, she also lost her career in real estate and corporate sales. After a period of depression, Evans decided she wouldn't lose it all. "I felt...
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Charter schools leader tackles new role: Mayor chooses Harris to launch broader public education programRestricted Content

August 28, 2006
Scott Olson
The Indiana General Assembly's decision in 2001 to hand Indianapolis Mayor Bart Peterson the keys to the city's new charter schools initiative marked the first time in the nation that a municipal leader had been given the authority to grant charters. The unusual approach to improve educational opportunities here has earned the city several accolades, including last month's prestigious Harvard University Innovations in American Government Award. Now the mayor wants to expand upon the program's success and launch a not-for-profit...
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Lean manufacturers take stock of accounting innovation: Fishers company optimistic movement will gain favorRestricted Content

August 28, 2006
Anthony Schoettle
The leanest aspect of lean manufacturing is moving from the shop floor to the accounting office, where a new recordkeeping system is gaining a following. Proponents of so-called lean accounting say it's better than traditional accounting at measuring the cost savings and efficiencies of lean manufacturing, a business-improvement strategy that shortens the time between customer order and shipment. Instead of simply looking at inventory levels and sales numbers as traditional accounting does, lean accounting measures things such as worker productivity...
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ECONOMIC ANALYSIS: Simplistic ideas get in way of efforts to increase wagesRestricted Content

August 21, 2006
Patrick Barkey
To the small cadre of economists who have worked their entire professional lives trying to understand the complexities of how and why the labor market rewards some skills, occupations and people more than others, the popularity of the idea of a government-mandated minimum wage must be depressing. But it shouldn't be surprising. The notion that complex market outcomes can be explained by simplistic notions like greed or discrimination-solvable by the stroke of a lawmaker's pen-will probably always have a superficial...
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IU hires consultant for business plan overhaulRestricted Content

August 21, 2006
Peter Schnitzler
Taking a page from Purdue University's playbook, Indiana University has quietly put its economic-development efforts under review. IU hired Chicago-based Huron Consulting Group this month to examine its process of economic development and evaluate whether it matches Gov. Mitch Daniels' business-first agenda.
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RETURN ON TECHNOLOGY: Programmers make lousy site designersRestricted Content

August 21, 2006
Tim Altom
Many, perhaps most, Web sites are hard to use. That applies to commercial sites, personal sites, almost any kind of site. In the early days of the Web, nobody was surprised at this, because the Web was a dancing bear. The wonder wasn't that it danced gracefully, but that it danced at all. Today, visitors are much more discerning. In fact, there is a cottage industry in lambasting poorly designed sites. One of my favorite places to go on the...
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SPORTS: A grim look at what the city's future could holdRestricted Content

August 21, 2006
Bill Benner
I was having a fitful time trying to sleep. For some reason, the word "priorities" kept running through my mind. Then, suddenly, I felt as if I were awake, standing in downtown Indianapolis. I caught site of a calendar in a storefront window. I blinked and shook my head. It read August 2026, but the city didn't look 20 years more modern. If anything, it looked 20 years older. It was as if time had passed by the Indy I...
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State's Medicaid goal: better, cheaper care: FSSA says new approach will boost efficiencyRestricted Content

August 21, 2006
Tom Murphy
Better care through better management. That's the mantra behind the Indiana Family and Social Services Administration's push to limit Medicaid's cost growth to 5 percent annually. The state entity announced this month that it awarded $4.4 billion in contracts to three managed care organizations to provide coverage for pregnant women and children under its Hoosier Healthwise program. Next, Indiana wants to hire care managers to monitor the well-being of every Medicaid recipient in its aged, blind and disabled category. That...
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Professor reinvents classroom: Improving interaction reason behind DyKnowRestricted Content

August 21, 2006
Scott Olson
Dave Berque knew his first college teaching assignment couldn't get any worse when a fire in the overhead lights barely got a reaction from his students. "I was in a room with more than 100 people and only seven noticed it," said the chairman of DePauw University's Computer Science Department. "They were spending all of their energy copying notes and couldn't think about what was going on." The experience as a graduate student in the mid-1980s at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute...
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BRIAN WILLIAMS Commentary: The heat will hurt more next winterRestricted Content

August 14, 2006
Geopolitical instability and increasing worldwide demand for fossil fuels have caused high energy prices. Indiana tax policies in support of the creation of ethanol and biodiesel production facilities are part of an effort to help wean our transportation infrastructure from fossil fuels. While ethanol may be a poor alternative to fossil fuels, Hoosier entrepreneurs' and policymakers' efforts in this area reflect a broad awareness that we need a sensible, comprehensive energy policy. A corollary to $3-per-gallon gas is increasing home-heating...
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NOTIONS: Preventing the pain that triggers bombs and bulletsRestricted Content

August 14, 2006
Bruce Hetrick
A few weeks ago, my 18-year-old son, Austin, said he was in the mood for a movie. His friend, Jon, had been to see "Miami Vice." Jon said it was "cool." I said that the old TV version-which began airing before Austin was born-had been "cool," too. So based on that trans-generational cool factor, we grabbed dinner at Chili's and went to see America's most celebrated vice cops, Sonny Crockett and Ricardo Tubbs, do their undercover thing. On the big...
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IU to seek $80M from state for massive life sciences pushRestricted Content

August 14, 2006
Tom Murphy
Indiana University leaders believe their researchers can spawn 100 new companies, pump $2.4 billion into the state's economy, help create 14,000 jobs, and generate a $2.25 return for every dollar spends if the General Assembly will invest in their bold life sciences strategy.
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EYE ON THE PIE: Novel ideas from Pat and BeurtRestricted Content

August 14, 2006
Morton Marcus
Pat Bauer is a longterm member of the Indiana House of Representatives from South Bend. A Democratic majority in the lower house will make him again the speaker of the House, one of the few powerful voices in the state's governing structure. Some do not view Bauer as the progressive sort of leader the state needs today. Yet his ideas are based on an experienced and solid reading of public sentiment. Beurt SerVaas is retired from a productive career in...
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Butler juniors to stay on campus next year: University wants to boost campus, fill apartmentsRestricted Content

August 7, 2006
Jennifer Whitson
Butler University underclassmen got what some saw as very bad news last week: Starting in the fall of 2007, juniors-like freshmen and sophomores-will be required to live on campus. The university claims the new rule will make for a stronger on-campus community, but the change coincides with Butler's struggle to fill a new 500-bed apartment facility, where rents are higher than offcampus rental houses. Butler President Bobby Fong said a change has been underway for years to try to align...
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School races past capital campaign goal: University of Indianapolis raised $76 million in first-ever comprehensive funding driveRestricted Content

August 7, 2006
Jennifer Whitson
When Michael Ferin took over the University of Indianapolis' fundraising operations in 1997, he inherited a limp effort ill-equipped to support exponential enrollment growth "The institution did not have a very strong record of reaching out to the community or keeping in touch with their alumni," Ferin said. "This place was behind by a number of years." No one could say that now. The private college affiliated with the United Methodist Church has just wrapped up a six-year capital campaign...
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NOTIONS: A suburban pay-me-now-or-pay-me-later storyRestricted Content

July 31, 2006
Bruce Hetrick
Longer ago than I'd like to admit, my parents were expecting their first child (me). And they wanted their little guy to grow up in a nice, safe neighborhood. Mom and Dad weren't earning much. But they borrowed a down payment from Grandpa, took out a whopping $80-per-month mortgage, and purchased a tiny, newly constructed house on the outskirts of Lafayette. My parents had grown up in the established parts of Lafayette. They knew well the old homes, old streets...
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IUPUI's tourism department luring hundreds of students: City's convention industry, program's focus on meeting planning make department fastest growing on campusRestricted Content

July 31, 2006
Tracy Donhardt
After Kelly Sernau earned an associate in arts degree in hospitality at Michigan State University, she began researching schools that offered a bachelor's degree in the field. She considered staying in her home state, then researched schools in Chicago and other places. Ultimately, she opted to transfer to IUPUI's Department of Tourism, Conventions and Event Management within the School of Physical Education and Tourism Management. "I wanted to focus on meeting planning, [but] most programs focus on the hotel aspect...
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  1. A couple of issues need some clarification especially since my name was on the list. I am not sure how this information was obtained and from where. For me, the amount was incorrect to begin with and the money does not come to me personally. I am guessing that the names listed are the Principal Investigators (individual responsible for the conduct of the trail) for the different pharmaceutical trials and not the entity which receives the checks. In my case, I participate in Phase II and Phase III trials which are required for new drug development. Your article should differentiate the amount of money received for consulting, for speaking fees, and for conduct of a clinical trial for new drug development. The lumping of all of these categories may give the reader a false impression of physicians just trying to get rich. The Sunshine Law may help to differentiate these categories in the future. The public should be aware that the Clinical Trial Industry could be a real economic driver for Indiana since these revenues supports jobs and new job creation. Nationally, this account for 10-20 billion which our State is missing out on to a large degree. Yes, new drug and technology development has gotten most of the attention (e.g. CTSI, BioCrossroads, etc.) However, serious money is being left on the table by not participating in the clinical trials to get those new drugs and medical devices on the market!!!! I guess that this is not sexy enough for academia.

  2. The address given for the Goldfish Swim Club is the Ace Hardware, is it closing?

  3. Out of state management and ownership. If Kite controlled it, everything would be leased. Of course, due to the roundabout, there is limited access to the south side of 116th now also. Just have to go down to the light.

  4. Hey smudge, You're opposed to arresting people for minor crimes? Sounds great! We should only focus on murders and such, right? Let's stand around and wait until someone shoots someone before we act. Whatever we do, we should never question anyone, frisk anyone, or arrest anyone unless they are actively engaged in shooting or stabbing. Very sound!

  5. You guys are being really rude to gays in the comments. (Not all of you, I presume). You need to stop it. Gays have just as much of a right to marry as straight people do. It's not fair how you guys are denying them equal rights. They're acting more human than you'll ever be. We obviously haven't matured since the bible was last updated. Hate the sin, not the sinner. You've all committed a sin at least once in your life. You've lied, you've stolen, etc. (Those are just possibilities). We should have a planet for people that support gay rights and a planet for people that don't. Then, gay people could get married without you bigots interfering with their love life. How would you feel if straights couldn't get married? How would you feel if teenagers were afraid to come out to their parents as straight? If straight people got hate everywhere they went? If straight people were afraid to go out in public, because they feared being judged? It's never going to happen at the rate society is going. You haven't seen the side of me where I act obscene. You're glad my inner demon hasn't been released. I would, but oh no, my comment would be removed because of my very strong emotions about this subject. I love gays, and love how they show their affection for each other. I just ADORE how a state is going to give same-sex couples a marriage license, then changes their mind. (I was obviously being sarcastic there). I just LOVE how society thinks gays are an abomination to our society. You're caring about marriage between two men or two women. That's a small thing. Just grow up, and let them marry. Let them live their lives. You can't make them change their sexuality. You can't make them change their lifestyle. In my opinion, gays are more than welcome to marry. Please, grow up and realize that people should be allowed to marry, even if it's same-sex marriage. You guys are saying that "the bible said gay marriage is wrong." Well, guess what else is wrong? Read Matthew:7 and you'll find out. (I am in no way breaking that. I am saying a fact). I'm stating that gays have just as much of a right to marry as straights do. (:

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