Education & Workforce Development

Legislators set for full-day push: Everybody seems to want all-day kindergarten, but questions linger over pace of implementation and fundingRestricted Content

December 4, 2006
Peter Schnitzler
It's the definition of an issue ripe for bipartisan compromise. Gov. Frank O'Bannon, a Democrat, proposed the state should underwrite full-day kindergarten in public schools. His successor and fellow Democrat, Joe Kernan, supported the idea. And now Gov. Mitch Daniels, a Republican, has taken up the early-education cause. "It's almost universally acknowledged to be a good idea," said Indiana Legislative Insight Publisher Ed Feigenbaum. "It's simply a matter of, 'Where do we come up with the funding?'" According to the...
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ABDUL-HAKIM SHABAZZ Commentary: The war on Christmas is imaginaryRestricted Content

December 4, 2006
With the passing of Thanksgiving, we are now in the official Holiday Season. It means a lot of things to a lot of people, including the "war on Christmas." Yes, it's the time of year when every conservative commentator and organization comes out with the "list" of examples that show America's traditional Christian roots are under attack, and the war against Christmas is living proof. I decided to do a little research. First, most of what we consider Christmas has...
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Bipartisan control will force compromises: With campaigns over, legislators get down to business on new budget, property-tax relief and other issuesRestricted Content

December 4, 2006
Peter Schnitzler
In his 2007 legislative preview for the Indiana Chamber of Commerce, State Rep. Brian Bosma, R-Indianapolis, opened with a joke: After a politician's death, he found himself standing before the pearly gates. St. Peter offered the politician a choice of heaven or hell, prefaced by a brief preview of each. During his visit to hell, the politician was surprised to discover all his friends there. What's more, it was a terrific place to be-the most fun and raucous party he'd...
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EYE ON THE PIE: Indiana: a primer for the LegislatureRestricted Content

November 27, 2006
Morton Marcus
The General Assembly is organizing itself. This is more difficult than getting fleas to join a union. But I am being disrespectful. My purpose this week is benign. I present for the consideration of our 150 legislators certain facts about Indiana and where it ranks nationally. The data are from the 2005 American Community Survey conducted by the U.S. Bureau of the Census. First, let's consider sex. Of the 6.1 million Hoosiers, 50.9 percent are females, which leaves 49.1 percent...
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Coming attraction: Imax theater in Noblesville: Technology lets theaters show Hollywood blockbustersRestricted Content

November 27, 2006
Tammy Lieber
Once upon a time not so long ago, Imax films were nearly synonymous with museums. In Indianapolis and elsewhere, the largeformat movie screens-some as big as the side of an eight-story building-featured 40-minute films that took viewers to exotic places like outer space or the top of Mount Everest, and were usually attached to educational and cultural institutions. But technology that debuted in 2002 is bringing Imax screens to suburbia-including to Noblesville in 2008. Grand Rapids, Mich.-based Goodrich Quality Theaters...
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NOTIONS: Let's clear the air at state schoolsRestricted Content

November 27, 2006
Bruce Hetrick
Long ago, I did some work for Special Olympics. In the process, I learned a semantic preference of the organization: One never says "mentally retarded people." One says "people with mental retardation." The rationale: These athletes are people first, not a condition. Long ago, I also did AIDS education and prevention work. In the process, I learned a semantic preference of health organizations and their clients: One never says "AIDS victims." One says "people with AIDS." The rationale: Those with...
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Papa program: boon or boondoggle? EYE ON THE PIE Morton Marcus:Restricted Content

November 20, 2006
The sleet was furious, but there stood Fred Fetid, my neighbor, at my front door. "May I come in?" he said. "Certainly," I responded. He took off his soaked coat. I turned on the faux fireplace in my living room, got him some bourbon and asked, "What's up?" "I'm confused," Fred said. "Just last week, Sen. Evan Bayh announced that nearly $1 million will come to the Indiana Youth Institute to encourage responsible fatherhood. It's part of a $50 million...
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Taking apart PCs, rebuilding lives: Workforce Inc. recycling program helps ex-prisoners prepare for employmentRestricted Content

November 20, 2006
Scott Olson
Timothy Smith spent 22 years behind bars for committing a violent crime he'd rather not talk about. The Indianapolis native released from prison just two months ago cannot stop praising the transitional program meant to help him and other former inmates find jobs and rebuild their lives. "This place has been a godsend for me," Smith said. "Coming out of prison, you don't have much of a job history. It gives you something to look forward to." Smith, who entered...
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Techies push for education initiatives: Daniels administration trying to heed call to build a better-equipped work force with 'Accelerating Growth' planRestricted Content

November 13, 2006
Peter Schnitzler
The numbers are daunting. According to Gov. Mitch Daniels' economic development plan "Accelerating Growth," Indiana ranks 35th out of 50 states for the proportion of its population with at least an associate's degree. Worse, it ranks 47th for bachelor's degrees. A full million Hoosiers "lack the basic skills necessary for 21st century employment," according to the plan. That's about a sixth of the state's population. High-tech leaders are increasingly focused on reversing the trend. They know the availability of a...
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Techpoint's new leader sees room to grow: Indiana making progress, but could do better, he saysRestricted Content

November 13, 2006
Scott Olson
Techpoint, a locally based technology trade group that represents the interests of about 330 members statewide, is undergoing a transition in leadership. Jim Jay, 37, has been named interim CEO following the resignation of Cameron Carter, who has led the organization since 2003. Directors should begin a formal search for a permanent replacement the first of the year. Whether Jay lands the top job remains to be seen. But in the meantime, the Butler University graduate with an entrepreneurial spirit...
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ECONOMIC ANALYSIS: Our technology woes begin in grade schoolRestricted Content

November 13, 2006
Patrick Barkey
Those of us who work for universities soon become acquainted with the concept of tenure, which is a status typically conferred upon those of faculty rank who have demonstrated to their colleagues the ability to teach and conduct research to a high standard. Those who achieve tenured status are more free to speak their minds about controversial issues, since it is much more difficult for their superiors to terminate or dismiss them without just cause. The words penned in this...
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EYE ON THE PIE: How much do property rights matter?Restricted Content

November 13, 2006
Morton Marcus
Rep. Roberta Righteous won reelection to the Indiana House again this year without opposition. We met for coffee and cinnamon rolls at a quiet spot near the Statehouse. "What's going to be this year's hot topic in the Legislature?" I asked. "Not prayer," she said. "Not abortion, not education, not even jobs. The issue will be protecting property rights." "Are property rights being threatened?" I asked, licking the frosting from my fingers. "No more than usual," she responded with a...
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Martin University to lose its founder, but not his philosophyRestricted Content

November 6, 2006
Chris O'Malley
In an 80-grit patch of the city fluent in poverty and despair, the Rev. Father Boniface Hardin lectures a visitor on how businesspeople need to learn the language and culture of countries where they operate. If not out of deference, then do it for practical reasons, he says, painting a picture of foreign business partners who "bow their heads and say, 'This guy is one big sucker and we can rip him off,' in their language." What at first sounds...
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High school dropouts go under microscope: IPS seeks answers from leaders on costly problemRestricted Content

November 6, 2006
Chris O\'malley
Indianapolis Public Schools late this month plans to convene a community panel to help the state's largest school system implement a dropout prevention plan next spring. The first public meeting of the 50-person panel is set for Nov. 27 and comes as a new report suggests Indiana dropouts cost taxpayers $62 million a year. The panel is made up of a wide range of people, from parents to community leaders. Each of the estimated 21,000 dropouts statewide costs the state...
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NOTIONS: A memo to winning pols from the middling massesRestricted Content

November 6, 2006
Bruce Hetrick
One of my sons will vote for the first time this week. His twin got so busy with schoolwork and extracurriculars that he missed the registration deadline. With only a fraction of eligible American voters casting ballots on the Tuesday after the first Monday this November, "majority rules" once again will be a misnomer. In fact, with only the most partisan and deep-pocketed among us ruling the day and candidates pandering primarily to such activists' priorities, "fringe rules" would more...
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EYE ON THE PIE: We all could use a dose of civilityRestricted Content

November 6, 2006
Morton Marcus
Whenever life seems too gloomy to endure, there is relief to be found in the antics of the Bloomington City Council. That body of jokesters recently voted to permit households within the city limits to keep up to five chickens. These chickens will help supply fresh eggs, thereby reducing the community's dependency on unnatural food sources. (No, dear reader, I did not make this up.) We will not claim the City Council of Bloomington is sexist because it permits egg-laying...
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New ballet school takes over space left by failed dance groupRestricted Content

September 25, 2006
Nick Crews
Victoria Lyras began classes for her newly created Indianapolis School of Ballet Aug. 21 in 10,500-square-foot quarters on Capitol Avenue that previously housed Ballet Internationale's Clara R. Noyes Academy, which closed in November because of financial problems. ISB has 20 students so far.
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Estate planning lawyers can become specialists: New exam lets Indiana attorneys become certifiedRestricted Content

September 25, 2006
Michael W.
Attorney Jeff Hawkins has focused his law practice on estate planning and administration law for 14 years. He considers himself experienced but is not yet ready to declare himself a "specialist" or "certified" estate-planning attorney. That happens in November, and the designation depends on results of an exam. The Indiana State Bar Association has recently adopted a plan to make estate planning and administration a specialty status of law in Indiana, joining four other focuses that have donned the stature...
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VOICES FROM THE INDUSTRY: Taxes, school, health costs challenge affluent familiesRestricted Content

September 25, 2006
Ralph Nowak
Affluent families face many threats to their wealth. But three forces eroding the legacies in almost all of them are taxes, education costs and post-retirement health care. Fortunately, with proper planning, there are steps you can take to help ensure your wealth carries you through retirement comfortably with ample left over for your heirs. Make taxes manageable Taxes may be unavoidable but they can be managed in a way that makes them less destructive to your wealth. Specifically, the alternative...
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TAWN PARENT Commentary: Our dead deserve better than thisRestricted Content

September 25, 2006
Forget coming late to the daylightsaving time party. Even higher on the list of things we Hoosiers should be embarrassed about is our coroner system. Of course, embarrassment isn't the half of it. More troubling is that we elect and counties pay coroners who need no qualifications whatsoever, other than being adults and living in the county where they're elected. (Their day jobs range from truck driver to boat pilot.) Worst of all is the hindrance these underqualified officials can...
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NOTIONS: Dear philanthropist: Make me a daydream believerRestricted Content

September 18, 2006
Bruce Hetrick
Last month, I picked up my boys in Fort Wayne, drove north on Interstate 69, hooked a left at Interstate 94, and got off at the Portage, Mich., exit. There, we whiled away the weekend at a family reunion. The grownups ate too much, caught up on gossip and puttered around the lake in the speedboat. The teenagers, whom we rarely saw, did X-Box battle in the basement. On Sunday, after the kids had surfaced for lunch and the grandparents...
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Student sponsorship deal raises money, criticismRestricted Content

September 11, 2006
Andrea Muirragui
The Indianapolis office of Zurich-based UBS Financial Services Inc. is experimenting with "adopting" the freshman class at Herron High School as the UBS Scholars of 2010. Its foundation made a $100,000 gift to the startup charter school, and local employees made a commitment to tutor, mentor and otherwise support its first 92 students.
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State's new arts leader plans to take more public role: Indiana Arts Commission's strategy calls for Executive Director Lewis Ricci to be a vocal advocate for fundingRestricted Content

September 11, 2006
Jennifer Whitson
In the fall of 2005, the Indiana Arts Commission started a rigorous study to draft its next five-year strategy. After public hearings around the state, the full 15-member arts commission voted this summer to adopt the new plan. And now commissioners have someone to implement it. The chosen man, Lewis Ricci, is itching to take over the spot and turn the commission into a bully pulpit for the importance of the arts-and the need for public funding. "Advocacy is one...
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TOM HARTON Commentary: Crime takes indirect swipe at the artsRestricted Content

September 11, 2006
In Indianapolis, when the crime rate goes up or kids' test scores go down, it's not uncommon for people to point the finger at publicly funded sports facilities. "Our priorities are screwed up," observers opine. "We spend too much money on these playgrounds for the rich, and not enough on cops, courts and public education." The sports establishment here has been batting away this criticism for years. It goes with the territory in a city where sports is an important...
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Museums trip out over loyal donors: Cultural organizations are offering travel opportunities to generous patrons to inform them, gain more supportRestricted Content

September 11, 2006
Scott Olson
With a new director in place and a $74 million renovation and expansion complete, the next step for the Indianapolis Museum of Art is courting donors to financially back the enlarged operations. Those who pledge at least $2,500 to the IMA are invited to accompany, at their own expense, IMA Director Maxwell Anderson and his wife on a cruise in the fall of 2007 to Spain, France and Italy. The excursion coincides with the opening next year of the museum's...
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  1. I think the poster was being sarcastic and only posting or making fun of what is usually posted on here about anything being built in BR or d'town for that matter.

  2. Great news IRL fans: TURBO the IMS sanctioned movie about slugs running the Indy 500 has caught the Securities and Exchange Commission because Dreamworks had to take a $132MILLION write down...because the movie was such a flop. See, the Indy/IMS magic soiled another pair of drawers. Bwahahahahahaha! How's CARTOWN doing? HAHAHAHA...Indy is for losers.

  3. So disappointed in WIBC. This is the last straw to lose a good local morning program. I used to be able to rely on WIBC to give me good local information, news, weather and traffic on my 45 minute commute.Two incidents when I needed local, accurate information regarding severe weather were the first signs I could not now rely on WIBC. I work weekend 12 hour nights for a downtown hospital. This past winter when we had the worst snowfall in my 50 years of life, I came home on a Sunday morning, went to sleep (because I was to go back in Sunday night for another 12 hour shift), and woke up around 1 p.m. to a house with no electricity. I keep an old battery powered radio around and turned on WIBC to see what was going on with the winter storm and the roads and the power outage. Sigh. Only policital stuff. Not even a break in to update on the winter storm warning. The second weather incident occurred when I was driving home during a severe thunderstorm a few months ago. I had already gotten a call from my husband that a tornado warning was just southwest of where I had been. I turned to WIBC to find out what direction the storm was headed so I could figure out a route home, only to find Rush on the air, and again, no breaking away from this stupidity to give me information. Thank God for my phone, which gave me the warning that I was driving in an area where a tornado was seen. Thanks for nothing WIBC. Good luck to you, Steve! We need more of you and not the politics of hatred that WIBC wants to shove at us. Good thing I have Satellite radio.

  4. I read the retail roundup article and tried Burritos and Beers tonight. I'm glad I did, for the food was great. Fresh authentic Mexican food. Great seasoning on the carne asada. A must try!!! Thanks for sharing.

  5. John, unfortunately CTRWD wants to put the tank(s) right next to a nature preserve and at the southern entrance to Carmel off of Keystone. Not exactly the kind of message you want to send to residents and visitors (come see our tanks as you enter our city and we build stuff in nature preserves...

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