Education & Workforce Development

NOTIONS: Sex makes us more squeamish than violenceRestricted Content

August 1, 2005
Bruce Hetrick
Two decades ago, while creating an A I D S - p r eve n t i o n campaign for Connecticut's state health department, I became a "sexpert." No, I didn't become an expert on sex itself (at least no more than your average married fellow). Nor did I conduct formal sex research (I leave that to the Kinsey Institute). Instead, I became an expert on how we Americans, Puritan descendents that many of us are, resist communicating about...
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Smaller-sized meetings bring in big bucks for city: Hospitality group sees value in events of all scalesRestricted Content

August 1, 2005
Tracy Donhardtreporter
Even event planners hire event planners. When Cynthia Howell needed to plan an event in the city for a state health care organization, she called Betsy Ward, a member of the meetings team at the Indianapolis Convention and Visitors Association. With what Howell calls minimal effort on her part, the Indiana Primary Health Care Association Inc. will stay in 50 rooms for two nights at the Sheraton Indianapolis Hotel and Suites at Keystone at the Crossing this fall. The group...
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University Place getting major makeover: New owner IUPUI investing $13M in renovation of 18-year-old hotelRestricted Content

August 1, 2005
Scott Olson
A hotel built during an era in which Indianapolis first laid claim to its title of Amateur Sports Capital of the World has a new owner that is spending millions of dollars to bring the structure into the new century. University Place Conference Center & Hotel, on the campus of IUPUI, opened amid the fanfare of the Pan American Games hosted by Indianapolis in 1987. Nearly 4,500 athletes from 38 countries converged on downtown, including a throng of media that...
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Bias claimed at Citizens Gas: Black workers: Test limited advancementRestricted Content

August 1, 2005
Chris O\'malley
Citizens Gas & Coke Utility is battling allegations that a test used to screen employees and outside job applicants was biased against blacks, hindering their chances of getting hired or advancing. The city-owned utility last year reached a confidential settlement with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission on behalf of applicants who weren't hired because the test "has an adverse impact on black employees and applicants for promotion, transfers and hire," according to EEOC documents. Now, that settlement-which included cash payouts...
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VIEWPOINT: Arts education is not disposableRestricted Content

July 25, 2005
Helen H.
Our forefathers had it right. In planning for the eight symbols of Indiana's values that grace the high arches of the rotunda in the state capitol, art ranks right up there with commerce, justice, liberty, history, agriculture, oratory and law. Each of these is depicted in 20-foot statues that hold a color palette, a book or a shock of wheat that reveals in iconic form the tools of that particular area. Interesting to note that, without art, none of the...
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Tax credits aid blighted areas: Help open to firms targeting Center Township projectsRestricted Content

July 25, 2005
Scott Olson
Federal tax credits supporting roughly $6 million in economic development projects are still available for small-business owners considering expanding or locating in Center Township. The funds are administered through the New Markets Tax Credit Program, which was established by Congress in 2000 to help revitalize blighted areas. In Indiana, the locally based Urban Enterprise Association Inc. helped secure tax credits that can fund $50 million worth of projects, including $12.5 million in Marion County. The tax credits already are supporting...
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EYE ON THE PIE: Brothers set example for today's execsRestricted Content

July 25, 2005
Morton Marcus
Most of us know the fabled heroes of Bean Town. They include the Adams cousins (John and Sam). Paul Revere. The Kennedy brothers (John, Robert and Edward). Ted Williams, Carl Yazstremski, Bobby Orr, Bob Cousey, Bill Russell, Larry Bird and Tom Brady. Yet Boston's most significant business heroes are not well-known today, at a time when their example could be most useful. Two brothers, Edward and Lincoln Filene, inherited their father's department store in 1890. They spent the rest of...
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Planner sinks his teeth into dentists' finances: Four Quadrant builds business around one industryRestricted Content

July 25, 2005
Ed Callahan
Dentists know a lot about operating a dental drill, but sometimes not so much about operating a business. That's where Four Quadrant Wealth Advisors likes to comes in. Indianapolis-based Four Quadrant provides its dental clients with financial advice on everything from running the money side of their practices to building their retirement funds. As one of a fairly small number of financial advice firms that focus on a single type of client, Four Quadrants limits its clients to dentists or...
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Program hopes to boost women in science: IUPUI to put female science students under one roof to nurture their interest in field often dominated by menRestricted Content

July 18, 2005
Tracy Donhardtreporter
The "girls aren't good at science" myth still exists, according to many science educators. That is why a new School of Science program at IUPUI hopes to do its part to dispel the label many say is created as early as elementary school. IUPUI's Women in Science House will literally house together women studying science, providing a nurturing environ ment for female students who often feel isolated, a factor that can cause them to change majors, said Pam Crowell, director...
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VIEWPOINT: Hoosiers gave tech transfer a big boostRestricted Content

July 18, 2005
Cam Carter
Today, we take for granted that our state universities play a role far beyond their traditional educational mission-especially in the economic arena. University-sponsored research is being licensed to the private sector, or used to form new companies. Universities are managing business incubators. Consulting partnerships between academia and industry are commonplace. It wasn't always this way. Not long ago, university officials were skeptical of becoming too involved with the private sector. Business leaders and investors didn't recognize the value of innovation...
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Music events seeking rhythm: Midwest Music Summit picks up the beat for industry convention expected to draw 23,000Restricted Content

July 18, 2005
Andrea Muirragui
The Midwest Music Summit is approaching its fifth year bigger than ever as organizers fine-tune an event they hope will find harmony with a massive convention planned for the same weekend. More than 400 artists are slated to perform at 35 venues throughout the city during the July 21-23 summit-scheduled this year to coincide with International Music Products Association's NAMM Summer Session, an annual gathering expected to draw 23,000 music aficionados for its first stop in Indianapolis. The timing is...
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Diversity marketing gains steam in central Indiana: Ad agencies helping convey cultural revelancyRestricted Content

July 11, 2005
Anthony Schoettle
Ethnic or diversity marketing, once confined to major cities such as Dallas, New York and Los Angeles, is taking hold in Indianapolis. "We have seen a gradual but growing response among clients to communicate to a multicultural audience," said Clyde Bodkin, president of locally based Bodkin Associates Inc. "Not everyone is in the same place, but smart companies are finding culturally sensitive, culturally relevant ways to communicate to their target markets." Diversity marketing is the fastest-growing sector of Bodkin's 14-person...
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Degree combines medicine, business: IU grads put in 5 years to earn combo MD/MBARestricted Content

July 11, 2005
Katie Maurer
Tell people you have your MD and they'll likely be impressed. Tell them you also have an MBA-well, now you're just showing off. For four recent Indiana University graduates, however, impressing others had nothing to do with their decision to pursue simultaneous medical and business degrees. It's all about making their way in the increasingly complicated field of health care, where being a good doctor is about more than having the highest grades in medical school. The four students received...
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Historic battle settled: Prairie pact lays out plans without judging past practicesRestricted Content

July 11, 2005
Andrea Muirragui
But whatever Earlham College puts in the 41-year history of credits and debits, it will have no bearing on the resolution of a decades-long dispute over control of the Hamilton County attraction. That deal is largely done. Carter and Earlham board Chairman Mark B. Myers ended nearly two years of negotiation July 5, putting quill-topped ballpoint to paper in front of a cheering crowd in the museum's Welcome Center. The agreement-which frees Conner Prairie from Earlham's control and calls for...
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Education programs provide job opportunities: Career Connections aims to curb turnover at entry levelRestricted Content

July 11, 2005
Tracy Donhardtreporter
When Luvinia Hollis moved to Indianapolis from Kentucky about five years ago, the then-42-year-old had few skills, so landing a job was difficult. She lived with her sisters and got some help from her ex-husband, but trying to make ends meet on $100 a week was nearly impossible. "It was so horrible for me, you wouldn't believe," Hollis said. She worked odd jobs for the next few years, making barely more than minimum wage. Eventually, she found her way to...
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SPORTS: NBA's delayed-entry rule, Michelin's move and moreRestricted Content

July 4, 2005
Bill Benner
So much news, so little space. Item: The NBA and its players' association enter into a new collective bargaining agreement that will increase the age for draft eligibility to 19, or to one year after an athlete's high school class has graduated. Reaction: Perhaps the NBA and its players' association believed they were tossing those involved in college basketball a bone by raising the age limit. If so, it is a bone that likely will stick in the throats of...
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ITT paid for feds' aggression: Sweeping probe didn't lead to charges against firm, top execsRestricted Content

July 4, 2005
Greg Andrews
On a chilly winter morning 16 months ago, federal investigators converged on ITT Educational Services Inc.'s Carmel headquarters and 10 of its 77 campuses, gathering documents in a high-profile raid that rattled investors and sent the company's shares into a free fall. Now, the U.S. Attorney's Office in Houston, which obtained the search warrants authorizing the raid, acknowledges its sweeping criminal probe failed to turn up evidence that would justify charges against the company or its top brass. The turnabout,...
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BEHIND THE NEWS: Guidant's woes turn J&J deal into game of chanceRestricted Content

July 4, 2005
Greg Andrews
Just a few months ago, some analysts were grumbling that Guidant Corp. was selling to Johnson & Johnson for too low a price. Why did Guidant accept $76 a share, they wondered, when on its own the company might be on its way to $80 or even $90? Guidant CEO Ron Dollens' response: That's possible, but the medical device field is fraught with risks and uncertainties. Given that, he told IBJ in December, $76 a share, or a total of...
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Universities reach out to improve diversity: Purdue, IU use local offices to lure minority suppliersRestricted Content

July 4, 2005
Ed Callahan
Purdue University's most recent step includes opening an office in Indianapolis that will serve as a contact point for minority-owned companies that are interested in doing business with the school. Purdue also is becoming one of the major sponsors of the annual Indiana Black Expo. These two projects are being headed by Jesse Moore, who became Purdue's manager for supplier diversity development in February. Moore previously led the Indianapolis Black Chamber of Commerce for nine years. Officials say it's important...
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NOTIONS: Does principal or principle matter more?Restricted Content

June 27, 2005
Bruce Hetrick
A few weeks ago, my friend John and I treated our three 17-year-olds to a boys' night out. We started off at Bazbeaux downtown, inhaling guy pizza (read: pepperoni and sausage) and dissecting the big news of the day-Michael Jackson's acquittal on charges that he shared alcohol, porn and a little night groping with a teen-age boy. Our teen-age boys, news junkies all, then rattled on about kids getting paid to play online video games and the proliferation of "cheats"...
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Taking the pulse of life sciences: Experts weigh in on whether Indiana is keeping up in the economic development raceRestricted Content

June 27, 2005
IBJ: Is Indiana gaining ground against other states in the race to grow as a life sciences hub? What are some specific benchmarks that underscore your opinion? JOHNSON: Indiana is gaining ground, but Indiana already starts on really very substantial ground. There are a lot of outside validations of that and I think it's important for this audience to hear a couple of them because there is nothing like having people on the outside pay attention to what we're doing...
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Schools follow different flight paths: Aviation programs see contrasting demandRestricted Content

June 27, 2005
Tracy Donhardtreporter
Two aircraft maintenance programs in close proximity to each other are far apart when it comes to successfully filling classrooms with budding mechanics. Times are so tough for Vincennes University's struggling aircraft maintenance program at Indianapolis International Airport's Aviation Technology Center that it asked for permission to conduct three non-aviation degree programs there. The aviation program, which enrolled about 300 students in the mid-1990s, now has about 75. Vincennes officials blame the United Airlines Maintenance hub closure, which displaced 1,200...
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ECONOMIC ANALYSIS Patrick Barkey: Intelligence isn't only factor that sets earnings potentialRestricted Content

June 27, 2005
Do we have a passion for economics? Judging from the numbers of economics majors at colleges and universities across the country, the answer is probably no. The world of graphs and statistics we inhabit is not everyone's cup of tea. But if few of us like to study the economy, we all have to live and work within its borders. And the most important interaction most of us will ever have with the economy occurs when we venture into the...
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SPORTS: The game is on: Academics vs. big-dollar sportsRestricted Content

June 20, 2005
Bill Benner
Give NCAA President Myles Brand and his Task Force on the Future of Intercollegiate Athletics their due. If you will pardon both the pun and the cliché, they're going to give it the old college try. Putting the paste back into the tube won't be easy. It will require a dramatic change in our sports culture-American in general, on campus in particular-to view intercollegiate athletics by any measure other than the one posted on the scoreboard. That is especially true...
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Charitable sector rides on road to recovery: Giving makes big jump for the first time since 2000Restricted Content

June 20, 2005
Andrea Muirragui
Americans gave more money to charity last year than ever before, signaling a return to the pre-9/11 philanthropic heyday. Contributions were up 5 percent, to $248.5 billion-the first significant increase after adjusting for inflation since 2000. "Things have been kind of flat," said Eugene Tempel, executive director at the Center on Philanthropy at Indiana University. "This ... tells us things are getting a little stronger. This is a good sign." Researchers at the center compile data each year and write...
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