Environment

MICKEY MAURER Commentary: Take off blinders to teen drinkingRestricted Content

June 18, 2007
Robocop was sighted in Boone County a couple of weeks ago. It was the occasion of a sleepover graduation party at the home of Jack Trudeau, former quarterback for the Indianapolis Colts. To create a safe environment for his daughter and her Park Tudor School classmates at the party, Trudeau reportedly told police, he recorded the name of every guest and confiscated all car keys. Although he said he did not supply liquor, he was no doubt aware that some...
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VIEWPOINT: Indy needs more contemporary designRestricted Content

June 18, 2007
Drew White
As an architect, I'm always interested in work that wins national architecture and interior-design awards. And as a contemporary design fan, I also make it a point to visit cities and attractions with unique and interesting design. So a few weeks back, I drove a couple of hours south to visit a boutique hotel in Louisville that's been creating a buzz and earning awards since it opened a year ago. The property is 21c, a 90-room hotel and museum dedicated...
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Star Financial is betting big on Indianapolis: Fort Wayne bank plans hub office, 4 new branchesRestricted Content

June 11, 2007
Cory Schouten
Undeterred by stepped-up competition and tough margins, Fort Wayne-based Star Financial Bank is building an Indianapolis regional hub and has lined up land for four new locations. The privately held bank launched an Indianapolis-area expansion effort in 2001, and now has seven offices here-including three in Fishers, one in Carmel and one in Noblesville. The latest expansion salvo includes 25,000 square feet of leased space within an office building under construction at Keystone at the Crossing, next door to the...
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ECONOMIC ANALYSIS: Focusing on factory jobs misses the big pictureRestricted Content

June 11, 2007
Patrick Barkey
There's been something peculiar going on in the business media in Indiana over the last few weeks. We've been beating ourselves up because the state is losing manufacturing jobs. Headlines about the decline are popping up, and state and local development officials are facing the bright light of media scrutiny. The chatter on Internet "talk-back" forums serves up plenty of people to blame-the governor, the unions, the Chinese and even our neighbors who buy imported goods. But if I could...
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PROFILE: Iasta.com Inc.: From chemicals to coatings E-sourcing software streamlines purchasing cycleRestricted Content

June 11, 2007
Della Pacheco
Iasta.comInc. From chemicals to coatings E-sourcing software streamlines purchasing cycle Companies wanting to gain a strategic foothold in today's fast-paced Internet-based supply chain marketplace are turning to companies like Indianapolisbased Iasta, an e-sourcing software and services company. Co-founder David Bush, senior vice president for business development, said Iasta's software product allows companies to be more competitive in tracking work flow and to conduct reverse auctions where suppliers can bid for their business. An Indiana University environmental science graduate, Bush started...
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VOICES FROM THE INDUSTRY: U.S. companies should evaluate Chinese tax changesRestricted Content

June 11, 2007
Jacqueline A.
Over the past three decades or so, foreign investment has been fueling China's economic growth. Companies from around the world have flocked to meet the needs of the largest population in the world: 1.3 billion citizens and counting. Shifts in China's political climate have made this Asian country ripe for commerce, and foreign companies-especially in the United States-have rushed in. Many U.S. manufacturers have been lured to China by tax holidays and reduced tax rates on income generated from their...
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PROFILE: KARLA SNEEGAS: Clearing the murky air ITPC director leads charge toward smoke-free IndianaRestricted Content

June 11, 2007
Della Pacheco
PROFILE KARLA SNEEGAS Clearing the murky air ITPC director leads charge toward smoke-free Indiana Karla Sneegas is primed for battle. With the fervor of an ancient Crusader, this pint-sized warrior is fighting a "just war" to reduce Indiana's addiction to tobacco as executive director of the Indiana Tobacco Prevention and Cessation agency. At 4 feet, 11 inches, Sneegas is well-prepared for all foes. She's armed with knowledge learned as a public health professional and as former director of South Carolina's...
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SPORTS: Our Pacers could use all the help they can getRestricted Content

June 11, 2007
Bill Benner
Morris has no point guard skills I'm aware of and, ultimately, it will be up to the new head coach, O'Brien, to improve the on-court product in a way that's more palatable to the Pacers' eroding fan base. But as a point person in engaging the community-in particular the corporate community-there are few, if any, people in this city who have both the contacts and the respect of which Morris can boast. Even after five years away from Indianapolis trying...
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VOICES FROM THE INDUSTRY: As boomers age, companies need to court MillennialsRestricted Content

June 4, 2007
Michael Pottratz
Baby boomers are fast approaching the official retirement age, with the first of them turning 60 last year-President Bush and Bill Clinton being the most prominent among them. And as the boomers turn gray, a new generation has begun to make its presence known in the corporate world. In the 1990s, it was Generation X. Today, it is the so-called Millennial Generation-people born between 1977 and 1995. Tech-savvy, happy and creative, Millennials are nearly 80 million strong, by some estimates....
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NOTIONS: How to beat the high price of dependence on petrolRestricted Content

June 4, 2007
Bruce Hetrick
Went to the gas station last week. Filled 'er up. It'd been a few weeks since I'd done that. Seemed like the price had jumped pretty dramatically. The pump clicked off. The total read $48.75. Egad. Next day, Indianapolis declared a "Knozone Air Quality Action Day." Some fellow at the Department of Public Works told the local paper there was "literally dirt in the air." The paper described this gunk as "floating particles the diameter of a human hair," particles...
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Autism's rise challenges local agencies: Those with disorder face difficulties in locating meaningful employmentRestricted Content

June 4, 2007
Tracy Donhardt
Experts haven't pinpointed the exact reason, but they do know one thing-the rate at which children are being diagnosed with autism has been rising. About one child in 150 is diagnosed by the age of 8 with autism or a related autism spectrum disorder such as Asperger's syndrome, according to a recent study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. That rate is up about 10 times from the 1980s. Experts have a variety of theories to explain the...
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EYE ON THE PIE: Commuting boosts earnings for HoosiersRestricted Content

June 4, 2007
Morton Marcus
I was delighted to receive a new disc from the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis containing the latest annual data on economic conditions in every county in the nation. Now I have a more detailed picture of how our state functions and is changing. For example, the daily flows of commuters between counties within and outside Indiana are essential to our economic health. By commuting, Hoosier workers find better jobs and firms get the best workers. Commuting is easier when...
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Service drives education software maker: Angel Learning quickly weathers PR setbackRestricted Content

June 4, 2007
Peter Schnitzler
When The Indianapolis Star reported on its front page in mid-May that Indianapolis Public Schools had accidentally exposed thousands of private student records online, it was a potentially enormous public relations setback for locally based education software maker Angel Learning. Angel Learning had provided the software, and CEO Christopher Clapp said he immediately asked staffers to send explanation emails to all 300 of his customers. They then followed up with phone calls. He wanted to assuage clients' worries right away....
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Tiptoe through the toxins becomes walk in the park: $600,000 in federal, state grants fund initiative to turn former industrial sites into recreation areasRestricted Content

June 4, 2007
Chris O\'malley
Take a deep breath of that air, wafting with the fragrance of methylnaphthalene. And those violets-must be the lead and arsenic in the soil that give them such a lovely glow. Nothing quite refreshes like a stroll through a hazardous waste site. Or, in the eyes of state planners, make that a former hazardous waste site. The Indiana Brownfields Program will create the Indiana Brownfields Trails & Park Initiative. It will assess abandoned industrial and commercial properties with real or...
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Coal vendor not digging coke plant closure: Virginia firm sues Citizens Gas for breach of contractRestricted Content

May 28, 2007
Chris O\'malley
Citizens Gas & Coke Utility faces the first big fallout from a vendor involving the planned closure of its coke manufacturing plant. A breach-of-contract lawsuit by Bristol, Va.-based Central Coal Co. could make the plant even more of a money pit as Citizens seeks to cut its losses and escape the problems caused by falling coke demand and rising environmental compliance costs. Central Coal says it's out almost $831,000 because Indianapolis Coke failed to buy all the coal required under...
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Gorilla exhibit to be one of nation's largest: Apes and new oceans area designed to boost attendance, conservationRestricted Content

May 28, 2007
Jennifer Whitson
Fresh off the debut of a $9.5 million Oceans exhibit, the Indianapolis Zoo is already laying the groundwork for its next blockbuster. But it may come with a beastly price tag. A gorilla and bonobo habitat scheduled to open in 2013 is expected to cost tens of millions of dollars. "I can't tell you if this is a $30 million project or a $50 million project," said Indianapolis Zoo President Michael Crowther. "What I can tell you is that we're...
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Contamination reconsidered: Developers show more acceptance toward environmental trouble spots When property is scarce, mitigation becomes viableRestricted Content

May 21, 2007
Chris O\'malley
When property is scarce, mitigation becomes viable The plan to close Citizens Gas & Coke Utility's coke manufacturing plant this year has already brought a few inquires about its reuse potential. But perhaps the biggest impact of the foundry fuel-maker's demise will be stoking discussions over whether other environmentally scarred properties are ripe for redevelopment. Until recent years, many developers regarded any property with even a tinge of environmental contamination as if a parcel in Chernobyl. The coke plant "illustrates...
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What's ailing Indiana's banks?: State-based bank stocks are trailing national peers as industry deals with tough periodRestricted Content

May 14, 2007
Cory Schouten
Indiana bank stocks have taken a beating on Wall Street over the past year, lagging behind larger peers as the entire industry rides out an unfavorable environment. Shares of Indiana's 16 publicly traded banks dropped an average of 3 percent from May 4, 2006, to May 4, 2007, according to research by Carmel-based banking consulting firm Renninger & Associates LLC. Meanwhile, the nationwide SNL Financial bank index was up 4.4 percent. During the same period, the Dow Jones industrial average...
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Commentary: A plea for bio-focused policies:Restricted Content

May 14, 2007
Brian Williams
Commentary A plea for bio-focused policies On April 2, in a 5-4 decision, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that carbon dioxide is a pollutant under the Clean Air Act and can be regulated by the Environmental Protection Agency. While the ruling acknowledges the obvious, it offers a compelling rationale for Indiana elected officials to create an economic development strategy that leverages Hoosier intellectual capital and one of the state's greatest assets, our farmland. With the scope of the twin challenges...
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RETURN ON TECHNOLOGY: IT departments are often overworked and underfundedRestricted Content

May 14, 2007
Tim Altom
Why do trucking companies overload their trucks, when they know they'll damage the very highways they need for their livelihoods? Why do people keep defiantly watering their lawns in d r o u g h t - s t r i c ke n areas? Why do we buy cheap goods from discount retailers when we know they were made in sweatshops? And why do employees download streaming audio and video, when they're repeatedly warned that these things turn high-speed...
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STATEHOUSE DISPATCH: Gambling quenched lawmakers' appetite for new revenueRestricted Content

May 7, 2007
Ed Feigenbaum
The 2007 session of the Indiana General Assembly is now history. Whatever else might have been involved in shaping its outcome, nothing was so determinative as the revelation in the closing days that property taxes-driven by the first application of trending, rising property values in general, the elimination of the inventory tax, and some old-fashioned political legerdemain on the part of some assessors in different regions of the state-were expected to rise an average of 24 percent for taxes payable...
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Flood of traffic latest twist in RiverPlace battle: Indianapolis planners find traffic impact study for Fishers project leakyRestricted Content

May 7, 2007
Chris O\'malley
Environmentalists who lost a court battle to stop RiverPlace on grounds it will cause flooding upstream along the White River have been buoyed by concerns raised by Indianapolis officials that the 69-acre development could create a torrent of traffic trouble. Last month, in a letter sent to Fishers' public works director, the Department of Metropolitan Development cited numerous shortcomings with a traffic impact study commissioned by RiverPlace developer Centre Properties. Indianapolis-based Centre has asked Fishers to rezone the property, just...
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New strategies help some salons survive: Traditionalists say booth rental will remain the normRestricted Content

April 30, 2007
Jennifer Whitson
Americans spend billions every year on professional primping and pampering, but independent salons still are among the riskiest of small-business ventures-with a failure rate second only to restaurants. Hoping to buck that trend, some salon owners are trying different business models, breaking away from traditional booth-space rentals and engaging stylists as employees with a stake in the shop's success. Large chains like Great Clips broke the mold decades ago, paying employees an hourly wage to cut patrons' hair. Now local...
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VC expert: Businesses enjoy 'seller's market': In Q&A, private-equity veteran Scolnik discusses industry trendsRestricted Content

April 30, 2007
Peter Schnitzlerreporter
With $116.5 million in capital under management, Hammond Kennedy Whitney & Co. Inc. is Indiana's largest private equity firm focused on mergers and acquisitions. It regularly creates $5 million to $15 million deals to buy small and middle-market manufacturing companies with low risk of technical obsolescence. Founded in 1903, HKW maintains its headquarters in New York, but the bulk of its operations and activities are in Indiana. Its portfolio includes the Indianapolis-based centrifuge-maker CentraSep Technologies and corrugated sheet manufacturer Flutes...
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LEGAL: Don't be trapped by 'talent'-redefine it insteadRestricted Content

April 30, 2007
David Millard
To succeed at the highest level, businesses must redefine talent. Our wellmeaning quests for the best and brightest talent frequently lead us into painful traps. The Indiana Pacers have proven this point in dramatic fashion in recent years. Take the Ron Artest saga. Artest is an immensely talented athlete and clearly one of the top players in the NBA, but had highly publicized problems. No doubt his talent brought him many more chances than the 11th player on the roster...
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  1. Ron Spencer and the entire staff of Theater on the Square embraced IndyFringe when it came to Mass Ave in 2005. TOTS was not only a venue but Ron and his friends created, presented and appeared in shows which embraced the 'spirit of the fringe'. He's weathered all the storms and kept smiling ... bon voyage and thank you.

  2. Not sure how many sushi restaurants are enough, but there are three that I know of in various parts of downtown proper and all are pretty good.

  3. First off, it's "moron," not "moran." 2nd, YOU don't get to vote on someone else's rights and freedoms that are guaranteed by the US Constitution. That's why this is not a state's rights issue...putting something like this to vote by, well, people like you who are quite clearly intellectually challenged isn't necessary since the 14th amendment has already decided the issue. Which is why Indiana's effort is a wasted one and a waste of money...and will be overturned just like this has in every other state.

  4. Rick, how does granting theright to marry to people choosing to marry same-sex partners harm the lives of those who choose not to? I cannot for the life of me see any harm to people who choose not to marry someone of the same sex. We understand your choice to take the parts of the bible literally in your life. That is fine but why force your religious beliefs on others? I'm hoping the judges do the right thing and declare the ban unconstitutional so all citizens of Wisconsin and Indiana have the same marriage rights and that those who chose someone of the same sex do not have less rights than others.

  5. No one is complaining about these jobs coming to Indianapolis. We are complaining about the need to subsidize these low wage jobs. Why do you never hear a peep from republicans and tea partiers about this type of welfare? We should only be subsidizing high wage, high skilled jobs.

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