Environment

VC expert: Businesses enjoy 'seller's market': In Q&A, private-equity veteran Scolnik discusses industry trendsRestricted Content

April 30, 2007
Peter Schnitzlerreporter
With $116.5 million in capital under management, Hammond Kennedy Whitney & Co. Inc. is Indiana's largest private equity firm focused on mergers and acquisitions. It regularly creates $5 million to $15 million deals to buy small and middle-market manufacturing companies with low risk of technical obsolescence. Founded in 1903, HKW maintains its headquarters in New York, but the bulk of its operations and activities are in Indiana. Its portfolio includes the Indianapolis-based centrifuge-maker CentraSep Technologies and corrugated sheet manufacturer Flutes...
More

LEGAL: Don't be trapped by 'talent'-redefine it insteadRestricted Content

April 30, 2007
David Millard
To succeed at the highest level, businesses must redefine talent. Our wellmeaning quests for the best and brightest talent frequently lead us into painful traps. The Indiana Pacers have proven this point in dramatic fashion in recent years. Take the Ron Artest saga. Artest is an immensely talented athlete and clearly one of the top players in the NBA, but had highly publicized problems. No doubt his talent brought him many more chances than the 11th player on the roster...
More

Farmland values soaring, but still lag other sectors: Cornfields far more valuable when sold for other usesRestricted Content

April 23, 2007
Scott Olson
Escalating demand for corn driven by the ethanol boom is propelling farmland prices higher, but not nearly enough to deter commercial developers from nabbing prime pieces of property. An average acre of Indiana farmland rose last year in value almost 16 percent, representing the largest annual jump in at least two decades, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Prices this year are projected to increase by an even larger percentage. Land values are escalating because corn is expected to...
More

City buildings save money while gaining 'Star' status: EPA program gives tax breaks for energy efficiencyRestricted Content

April 23, 2007
Scott Olson
Thomson Inc. building, 10330 N. Meridian St. In 2006 alone, the EPA awarded more than 3,400 buildings nationwide with the Energy Star designation. Buildings can achieve the status by adopting an energy-management strategy and tracking the results during a 12-month period using an EPA rating system. Results need to be verified by a professional engineer. All Energy Star products qualify for a tax credit. A deduction of up to $1.80 a square foot is available to owners and designers of...
More

EYE ON THE PIE: A useful program for Indiana's futureRestricted Content

April 16, 2007
Morton Marcus
I could see she was mad when I walked in the coffee shop. State representative Roberta Righteous was adding packet after packet of sugar substitute to her extra large macho mocha. As I sat down with my cup of regular, she blurted, "Your column last week was another cruel attack on the General Assembly. All criticism, all sarcasm, but no constructive suggestions for progress." "You want constructive ideas," I said, "I'll give you some. "First, Indiana abandons partisan redistricting. When...
More

VIEWPOINT: Cultivate your young talent for successRestricted Content

April 16, 2007
Molly Wilkinson
When was the last time you gave someone a break? I don't mean the last time you stopped your car to let a convention attendee safely cross the street. Think back to the last time you made a difference in someone's career-a young person's career. The truth is, you probably manage at least one younger employee who is eager for a break, a promotion or a little more autonomy. Maybe you tried to give your up-and-comer a project to run...
More

EYE ON THE PIE: Time to stop being timid and tell the truthRestricted Content

April 9, 2007
Morton Marcus
The latest data from the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis show that Indiana ranks 33rd in per capita personal income. Fifty years earlier, in 1956, Indiana ranked 17th in the nation. Our state is in long-term economic freefall and we suffer with representatives who piddle away their time on raising revenue through gambling. Per capita personal income in Indiana has not been on par with the nation since 1966. We have a record of ongoing decline, interrupted briefly from time...
More

VOICES FROM THE INDUSTRY: Communications as usual just won't cut it anymoreRestricted Content

April 9, 2007
Jason T.
In 1999, when the World Wide Web was in its infancy, Rick Levine and others penned and posted "The Cluetrain Manifesto: The end of business as usual" (www.cluetrain.com). In this Web-focused document, their opening salvo at business as usual-and their wake-up call for American business- went thusly: "A powerful global conversation has begun. Through the Internet, people are discovering and inventing new ways to share relevant knowledge with blinding speed. As a direct result, markets are getting smarter-and getting smarter...
More

Waiting for a sensible transportation plan: CommentaryRestricted Content

April 9, 2007
Brian Williams
The Indiana Commerce Connector, those 75 miles of concrete through the Indiana countryside, was announced with great fanfare at the start of the 2007 legislative session and recently disappeared with equal aplomb. Thanks to the efforts of state Rep. Terri Austin, chairwoman of the House Roads and Transportation Committee, and the other members of that committee, the citizens of Indiana had ample opportunity to express their opinions on Indiana's transportation needs. While the governor's specific proposals for the Indiana Commerce...
More

Nursing school's computerized patient ain't no dummy: $36 million mannequin capable of simulating array of emergenciesRestricted Content

April 9, 2007
Scott Olson
Mr. Jackson is admitted to the hospital, complaining of shortness of breath and loss of appetite. The 71-year-old is experiencing tightness in his chest, although not enough to be considered painful. The nurses scurry to administer oxygen and draw blood while recommending an electrocardiogram to measure heart activity. Several minutes later, a diagnosis of heart failure is returned. The events unfolding at the Indiana University School of Nursing on the IUPUI campus mirror actual situations that could occur at any...
More

Task force to tackle big job: tallying infrastructure needs: Indianapolis Chamber of Commerce leads one-year studyRestricted Content

April 2, 2007
Peter Schnitzler
Indianapolis hasn't attempted to systematically catalog all its infrastructure needs since 1991. Back then, the Greater Indianapolis Chamber of Commerce collected a list of the most pressing local projects and presented it to Mayor Stephen Goldsmith. The price tag at that time: $1.1 billion. A lot has changed in the 16 years since the Chamber released its Getting Indianapolis Fit for Tomorrow report. Some problems it identified, such as the health risk of combined sewer overflows, have been partly addressed....
More

VOICES FROM THE INDUSTRY: It's time we change those modular-home stereotypesRestricted Content

March 26, 2007
Don Altemeyer
Mention modular housing and the first image that comes to mind is probably a TV reporter standing in front of a devastated trailer park in Tornado Alley. The "double-wide" with the screened-in porch somewhere in Florida may offer a much more comforting image. Nonethe- Americans their first chance at homeownership by manufacturing houses in factories and shipping the prepackaged kits to home sites. The visionary homes featured open floor plans, modern appliances, lighting fixtures and mechanical equipment. Sears sold more...
More

Crown Hill development showdown loomingRestricted Content

March 19, 2007
Cory Schouten
Debate over a developer's plan to buy 71 acres of woods and wetlands on Crown Hill Cemetery's northern edge for a retail-and-residential project will come to a head this week when the Metropolitan Development Commission votes on the proposal.
More

Physician assistants want OK to prescribe drugs: Bill would make Indiana last state to allow itRestricted Content

March 19, 2007
J.K. Wall
Indiana could see a wave of new physician assistants working here if lawmakers allow the medical technicians to prescribe medicine. So say the proponents of House Bill 1241, now being debated in the Indiana Senate. They claim Indiana, as the only state yet to grant the prescribing prerogative, forces doctors to hire fewer physician assistants and so loses health care workers to other states. That's a particularly important issue in rural and some urban areas, where doctors are scarce. Because...
More

Tax break would reward patent producers: Indiana legislators view bill as way to attract young, innovative high-tech companies and solo entrepreneursRestricted Content

March 12, 2007
Scott Olson
A bill weaving its way through the Indiana General Assembly could give the state an edge in attracting and growing the type of high-tech ventures several states covet. Indiana House Bill 1461, introduced by Rep. Brian Bosma, R-Indianapolis, advanced to the Senate after sailing through the House of Representatives on Feb. 26 by a vote of 95-3. The legislation that was referred to the Senate's Economic Development and Technology Committee would provide a tax incentive that would shield income from...
More

EYE ON THE PIE: Unsolicited advice for IU's next presidentRestricted Content

March 12, 2007
Morton Marcus
Congratulations, Dr. McRobbie, on being selected as Indiana University's next president. I've read that you are committed to helping IU become more active in the state's economic development. I've heard that from every IU president since I arrived in 1970. To be successful, it will take major changes. It is not sufficient to appoint a committee of administrators who then request each part of the university to submit a list of its "economic development activities" for ultimate inclusion in a...
More

VOICES FROM THE INDUSTRY: NFL in tough spot regarding Super Bowl church partiesRestricted Content

March 12, 2007
Jonathan L.
With the multitude of stories and media activity leading up to the Colts' appearance in Super Bowl XLI, who would have guessed that an otherwise mundane intellectual property enforcement issue concerning the NFL and a local church would take the top headline just days before the Big Game? Such was the case when the NFL sent a cease-and-desist letter to Fall Creek Baptist Church, thereby stopping the church's plans to show the Super Bowl on a 12-foot projection screen and...
More

CHRIS KATTERJOHN Commentary: IMA art park is a grand slamRestricted Content

March 5, 2007
Lest we overlook it among the rash of crimes, stock-market gyrations and General Assembly shenanigans reported in the media recently, the Indianapolis Museum of Art deserves some major kudos. Amid the chaos, the IMA announced the names of the 10 artists, artists' groups and architects who will create works for its Virginia B. Fairbanks Art & Nature Park set to open in 2009. It was a grand slam. Unveiled in New York Feb. 27, the list includes individuals or collectives...
More

Pets in the workplace: dog days or cat's meow?: Animals a great benefit for some businesses, but others might whine about itRestricted Content

February 26, 2007
Scott Olson
Sid Vicious-the cat, not the dead punk-rock renegade-and his feline friend Topper are almost as much a part of Halstead Architects as the eight employees. Perhaps they do enjoy destroying drawings more than sketching them, but their role at the Fountain Square firm has grown from mere mousers to beloved companions. That's especially true for architect Jeff Schroeder, who adopted Sid from the Indianapolis Humane Society after a rodent crawled up his leg following the firm's arrival at a former...
More

Goodwill plotting a $10 million reuse strategy: Not-for-profit renovates HQ for expanded charter schoolRestricted Content

February 19, 2007
Cory Schouten
Goodwill Industries of Central Indiana supports its job and educational programs by reselling used clothes, household items and even cars. But the virtues of reuse and recycle aren't confined to the not-for-profit's 34 local thrift stores. Goodwill has adapted its headquarters several times since it was built in 1960, to fill a variety of needs. Some of the same space within the 195,000-square-foot building has served as a retail store, an office full of cubicles, an industrial packing facility and...
More

VOICES FROM THE INDUSTRY: Coming to the defense of 'sprawl' in the suburbsRestricted Content

February 19, 2007
Brian Mann
Since World War II, strong public policies and economic conditions have led to booming homeownership in America, and rapid expansion of a great highway transportation system has accelerated our country's suburbanization. We all know the story; we are participants. In the 1960s, it was often referred to as the American Dream. Although never specifically defined, the American Dream always included having a family, a reliable (maybe even cool) car, a nice home of one's own, and the freedom to work,...
More

Guidelines target design of downtown development: New rules will protect urban character, supporters sayRestricted Content

February 19, 2007
Scott Olson
Downtown developments soon will come under extra scrutiny, once new design guidelines are approved in the spring. Known as Urban Design Indianapolis, the process of developing the criteria fell on the shoulders of several groups: the Department of Metropolitan Development, Historic Landmarks Foundation of Indiana, Ball State University's architectural school and the Urban Design Oversight Committee. The intent is not to mandate to developers that their buildings meet certain design standards, but rather that the cosmetics coalesce with the existing...
More

ECONOMIC ANALYSIS: Fate of U.S. auto industry is controlled by investorsRestricted Content

February 19, 2007
Patrick Barkey
On the same black Thursday that Borg Warner announced it would close its 780-worker Muncie manufacturing facility in 2009, the price of its stock surged 6 percent. Are the traders on Wall Street heartless, or prejudiced against Muncie, or do they simply like bad news? In truth, none of these answers is probably correct, although we really have no way of knowing. But the divergent reactions of stockholders and workers and their families to the news that nearly a century...
More

EYE ON THE PIE: Are we spending too much on pets?Restricted Content

February 19, 2007
Morton Marcus
"It's such a hassle, day after day after day," she said. "What's a hassle?" I asked. "Oh, you know," she answered, mixing her yogurt deep into the cereal. "Why," she continued without continuity, "don't you write about global warming? It's a very serious problem that they need to do something about." "Who are 'they'?" I inquired. "All the big guys," she said "the power brokers, the decision-makers and the office-holders, all of them." "Pandy," I said politely, "global warming and...
More

Calendar publisher wants to power his factory with windRestricted Content

February 12, 2007
Chris O'Malley
The Time Factory founder and CEO Jim Purcell wants to erect a 150-foot-tall wind turbine above his calendar factory near 62nd Street and Georgetown Road. Purcell figures the $200,000 contraption could power 60 percent--if he's lucky, maybe 80 percent--of his 22,000-square-foot facility.
More
Page  << 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 >> pager
Sponsored by
ADVERTISEMENT

facebook - twitter on Facebook & Twitter

Follow on TwitterFollow IBJ on Facebook:
Follow on TwitterFollow IBJ's Tweets on these topics:
 
Subscribe to IBJ
  1. A Tilted Kilt at a water park themed hotel? Who planned that one? I guess the Dad's need something to do while the kids are on the water slides.

  2. Don't come down on the fair for offering drinks. This is a craft and certainly one that belongs in agriculture due to ingredients. And for those worrying about how much you can drink. I'm sure it's more to do with liability than anything else. They don't want people suing for being over served. If you want a buzz, do a little pre-drinking before you go.

  3. I don't drink but go into this "controlled area" so my friend can drink. They have their 3 drink limit and then I give my friend my 3 drink limit. How is the fair going to control this very likely situation????

  4. I feel the conditions of the alcohol sales are a bit heavy handed, but you need to realize this is the first year in quite some time that beer & wine will be sold at the fair. They're starting off slowly to get a gauge on how it will perform this year - I would assume if everything goes fine that they relax some of the limits in the next year or couple of years. That said, I think requiring the consumption of alcohol to only occur in the beer tent is a bit much. That is going to be an awkward situation for those with minors - "Honey, I'm getting a beer... Ok, sure go ahead... Alright see you in just a min- half an hour."

  5. This might be an effort on the part of the State Fair Board to manage the risk until they get a better feel for it. However, the blanket notion that alcohol should not be served at "family oriented" events is perhaps an oversimplification. and not too realistic. For 15 years, I was a volunteer at the Indianapolis Air Show, which was as family oriented an event as it gets. We sold beer donated by Monarch Beverage Company and served by licensed and trained employees of United Package Liquors who were unpaid volunteers. And where did that money go? To central Indiana children's charities, including Riley Hospital for Children! It's all about managing the risk.

ADVERTISEMENT