Environment

BULLS & BEARS: Investors overlooking risk, and that spells troubleRestricted Content

February 12, 2007
Ken Skarbeck
I closed my last column by suggesting that the markets seem to be paying little attention to risk across a broad range of asset classes. One measure of risk is stock market volatility, or the magnitude of ups and downs in stock prices. The Wall Street Journal recently reported the following statistics compiled by the market analysts at Ned Davis Research: It has been almost 1,000 trading days since the Dow Jones industrial average has seen a 10-percent decline from...
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Technology-friendly legislation quietly advances: Bills could spur patent commercialization and moreRestricted Content

February 12, 2007
Peter Schnitzler
A handful of bills pending in the General Assembly could have a major impact on Indiana's high-tech sector. Legislation under consideration could stimulate increased commercialization of patented Indiana technology, channel more money toward development of alternative fuels, require regular review of Indiana's certified technology parks, and more. Tech leaders are optimistic about the chances their agenda will be approved. "It's the reason we married up with CICP," said Ron Brumbarger, chairman of TechPoint, a trade association for Indiana high-tech companies....
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Expanded recycling catches on in manufacturing sectorRestricted Content

February 12, 2007
Tammy Lieber
In manufacturing and industrial-heavy central Indiana, companies are beginning to realize that "going green" can translate into another kind of green--money. Reaching beyond the standard glass, paper and metal, markets are developing for a variety of materials, from tiny bits of processed rubber to leftover cornstarch.
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STATEHOUSE DISPATCH: This finally may be the year for property tax reformRestricted Content

February 12, 2007
Ed Feigenbaum
Brace yourself for lots of action in the next two weeks, as the deadlines approach for bills originating in the House to be passed to the Senate, and vice versa. While this is a long session of the General Assembly and one might assume this would lead to more deliberative contemplation, the extra days do not seem to make much difference as deadlines approach. Some of the larger issues that require more massaging and compromise tend not to be drafted...
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BRIAN WILLIAMS Commentary: Good legislation to promote good healthRestricted Content

February 12, 2007
BRIAN WILLIAMS Commentary Good legislation to promote good health The newly elected and re-elected men and women of the Indiana General Assembly will debate and vote on many issues of importance during the 2007 session. One legislative proposal upon which members of the General Assembly and governor should quickly reach consensus is the proposal put forth in House Bill 1160, authored by Rep. Craig Fry, D-Mishawaka, and Senate Bill 114, authored by Sen. Beverly Gard, R-Greenfield, that would change the...
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Providers have new rules to take on Medicaid fraud: Many companies required to educate employeesRestricted Content

February 5, 2007
Scott Olson
A federal law that took effect Jan. 1 requires hospitals and others serving the Medicaid population to teach their employees how to detect fraud and report it to the government. Medicaid is the joint federal-state program that provides health insurance coverage to the needy and is prone to abuse. In an effort to reduce abuse, the legislation requires companies that do at least $5 million annually in Medicaid business to educate all employees and officers on how to spot fraud....
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ECONOMIC ANALYSIS: Those from corrupt cultures more likely to ignore lawsRestricted Content

February 5, 2007
Patrick Barkey
Do we obey laws because we fear punishment? Or is it simply a habit we acquired to which we don't otherwise give much thought? Either way, it is a good thing for our communities, our governments and our entire society that so many of us are, generally speaking, law-abiding. One can scarcely imagine the chaos that would be caused if 300 million people lied, stole and murdered our way through the day without giving it a moment's thought. It's good...
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Recyclers fear competition for fundingRestricted Content

February 5, 2007
Chris O'Malley
Indiana recyclers concerned that waste-burning firms could gain status as recyclers--and vie for state grants and loans they've relied on for years--now have a potential competitor on the radar.
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VIEWPOINT: Let's create a culture of hospital safetyRestricted Content

January 29, 2007
Vincent C.
As Hoosiers jump into this new year, it is important that all Indiana health care providers resolve to improve patient safety. Since health care providers hold the public trust, they have a responsibility to all patients to deliver optimal health care in a safe environment. Studies show that most medical errors result from "system" errors, not people errors, so our state must create a culture of safety that encourages our medical professionals to report errors and highlight processes and procedures...
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Giant Ford plant could join warehouse conversion trend: Observers say size, age may be obstaclesRestricted Content

January 29, 2007
Jennifer Whitson
City officials haven't given up hope on keeping 1,400 lucrative manufacturing jobs at an Indianapolis steering parts plant, but Ford Motor Co. has. The company this month said it will close the facility by the end of 2008. A closure will leave the 1.8-millionsquare-foot building empty, but real estate observers say it could be redeveloped as leaseable industrial space-as shuttered Chrysler, Maytag and Western Electric factories nearby have been. Some of the premier projects in the area are leasing well,...
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Corporate shopping spree: Massive Guidant deal helps make 2006 a record-setting year for local M&A activityRestricted Content

January 29, 2007
Scott Olson
Last year was a record-shattering period for the Indianapolis-area merger and acquisition market, thanks in large part to the loss of one public corporation. Guidant Corp.'s acquisition by Boston Scientific Corp. for $28.4 billion last year and the related sale of its vascular business to Abbott Laboratories for $4.1 billion made the 2006 Big Deals list bigger than ever. That's because the two deals made up about 85 percent of the $38.5 billion of M&A activity tracked down by the...
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RETURN ON TECHNOLOGY: We need less of 'cool' and more of 'can do'Restricted Content

January 22, 2007
Tim Altom
I've been accused of being both technology-besotted and technology-averse. I'm neither one. I'm just interested in using technology in appropriate ways. I'm fond of reminding people that a pair of scissors is perfect for a job that a pair of scissors can do. Scissors don't need Tim Allen-style enhancements. An example popped up from reading "The Soul of a Chef," by Michael Ruhlman, where I ran across the statement by a young chef that a computer system made the difference...
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EYE ON THE PIE: You didn't know him and now he is goneRestricted Content

January 22, 2007
Morton Marcus
A quiet gentleman died last week. It did not make the headlines. Ken Miller never did make headlines, but he was part of your life and the lives of all Hoosiers for many years. If you thought of him at all, it was as taking your money, yet all that time Ken was carefully saving you money and modernizing state government. For 14 years, Ken was Indiana's commissioner of revenue. It was to his office that you sent your income-tax...
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City eyed for high-tech trash melting plant: Facility to be place where 'molecules are disassociated'Restricted Content

January 22, 2007
Chris O\'malley
An Illinois firm wants to destroy Indianapolis trash with a device more fearsome than Marvin the Martian's ACME disintegration pistol. Northbrook-based PEAT International Inc. would argue its 1,500-degree "plasma arc" treatment device, in which "molecules are disassociated into their basic elemental atomic constituents," is anything but Looney Tunes, however. PEAT, which already operates plasma plants to destroy solid waste in Taiwan, confirms that it is looking at building a plant locally. "We are still interested in the Indianapolis area. We're...
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ECONOMIC ANALYSIS: Our love-hate relationship with globalization boomRestricted Content

January 22, 2007
Patrick Barkey
Our generation didn't invent globalization, but we've certainly moved it to a new level. Even here in the isolated Midwest, it's hard to find a product, a job or a community that hasn't been affected by the high degree of connectivity among customers, businesses, and buyers and sellers of all kinds around the globe. We've enjoyed a cornucopia of incredible new products-from cell phones to flat-screen televisions to microprocessor-laden automobiles-that have had many or all of their principal parts made...
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Three-decade landfill battle rages onRestricted Content

January 22, 2007
Chris O'Malley
World War II could have been fought seven times over since Ralph Reed and sons first tried to build Mallard Lake Landfill outside of Anderson. The Reeds' dream of big cash from trash has upset hundreds of residents in subdivision-dotted fields since the family asked Madison County to rezone their 254-acre farm in the 1970s.
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New funding has Semafore set for trials: Local pharmaceutical company to test cancer drug on humansRestricted Content

January 22, 2007
Scott Olson
Hours before the underdog Florida Gators were crowned college football champions, Joseph Garlich wore a blue shirt to support the team as it prepared to upset the Ohio State University Buckeyes. Garlich, who spent two years as a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Florida's School of Pharmacy, is equally optimistic his biotech firm is on the verge of achieving a milestone of its own. The northwest-side Semafore Pharmaceuticals Inc. should launch within a few weeks human trials of its...
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VIEWPOINT: What we could learn from Fort WayneRestricted Content

January 22, 2007
Graham Richard
To be competitive in a global economy, city leaders must embrace change and look for innovative ways to attract jobs and private investment. In Fort Wayne, we are working to save energy and improve air and water quality to build a better city. We must decrease our dependence on imported oil for many reasons, including national security, cost of living and the need to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions. Energy and environmental concerns are directly related to economic development and quality of...
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SPORTS: Nice Colts fans? That's OK-if they're loyal to teamRestricted Content

January 15, 2007
Bill Benner
In the last couple of weeks, I've been interviewed by reporters from both the Kansas City Star and the Baltimore Sun. Both were pursuing the same angle: Indianapolis as a pro football town vis a vis Kansas City and Baltimore, and support for the notion that our citizenry in general and Colts fans in particular are "just too darn nice." My response to both was, well, yes, our folks and fans are nice, but that's not necessarily a bad thing...
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EYE ON THE PIE: It is time to accept I-69 and move onRestricted Content

December 25, 2006
Morton Marcus
I don't want to write this column; you don't want to read it. Yet, I must respond to the diehards who insist that building Interstate 69 (and almost any other road) will be detrimental to our state. Several economic and environmental studies support the Bloomington-Crane-Washington-Petersburg route to Evansville. Yet, time after time, supporters of the Terre Haute-Sullivan-Vincennes-Princeton route rise up and demand a reconsideration of the path. The Terre Haute crowd is afraid it will lose something if the Bloomington...
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Small talk with new SBDC chief: Central Indiana counseling office gets fresh start after years of uncertaintyRestricted Content

December 25, 2006
Cory Schouten
Victoria Hall this year took over the Central Indiana Small Business Development Center, which counsels more than 500 Hoosier entrepreneurs annually. Hall, a former vice president for H&R Block Tax Services, oversees four employees, including three business counselors. She also teaches part-time at Ivy Tech Community College, which hosts the local SBDC. She earned her MBA from the Indiana Institute of Technology in Fort Wayne. One of 11 regional centers in Indiana, Central Indiana SBDC has been plagued in recent...
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NOTIONS: Resolutions and predictions: Why bother?Restricted Content

December 25, 2006
Bruce Hetrick
Bruce Hetrick is on vacation this week. In his absence, this column, which appeared on Dec. 30, 2002, is being reprinted. The gym will be rife with resolvers these next few weeks. They'll arrive, eagerbeaver, wearing sweats, headphones and heart monitors purchased as Christmas gifts by relatives hoping to encourage good habits, longer lives and less flab to hold onto in the night. On all this pricey merchandise, you'll see Nike, Reebok, Adidas and Roots. That way, the resolvers can...
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HUMAN RESOURCES: Think your business is too small for HR? Think againRestricted Content

December 25, 2006
Tom Phillips
After squeezing 36 hours out of every 24-hour day, you have reached a milestone in your business: You realize you need help. How you find, hire and treat employees-from that first one to those that follow-can accelerate your success or throw obstacles in your way. The moment you begin the search for your first employee, you enter the intricate world of "human resources." If you're like many busy entrepreneurs, you have given little thought to how to do that. You...
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ECONOMIC ANALYSIS: Amid carnage, state still a force in manufacturingRestricted Content

December 18, 2006
Patrick Barkey
What puts Indiana on the map in the world's eyes? From an image point of view, it might be race cars, basketball or even David Letterman. But in terms of economic footprint, it is our manufactured products and our goods-making and goods-moving expertise that stand out. We are a world-class manufacturer of everything from rolled steel to artificial limbs, and we employ more people and produce more output in manufacturing, proportionately speaking, than any other state in the nation. If...
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Does gender matter in politics?: Despite high-profile wins, politics still remains a male-dominated fieldRestricted Content

December 11, 2006
Julie Young
1992 was dubbed the "Year of the Woman," when four women were elected to the U.S. Senate, but 2006 may be seen as the beginning of a new women's political movement, says Marie Wilson, president of The White House Project, a Washington, D.C.-based group that's working to advance women in political office. Indiana has made some strides, but 85 years after women won the hard-fought right to vote, the number of women in elected office at the national level hasn't...
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  1. Those of you yelling to deport them all should at least understand that the law allows minors (if not from a bordering country) to argue for asylum. If you don't like the law, you can petition Congress to change it. But you can't blindly scream that they all need to be deported now, unless you want your government to just decide which laws to follow and which to ignore.

  2. 52,000 children in a country with a population of nearly 300 million is decimal dust or a nano-amount of people that can be easily absorbed. In addition, the flow of children from central American countries is decreasing. BL - the country can easily absorb these children while at the same time trying to discourage more children from coming. There is tension between economic concerns and the values of Judeo-Christian believers. But, I cannot see how the economic argument can stand up against the values of the believers, which most people in this country espouse (but perhaps don't practice). The Governor, who is an alleged religious man and a family man, seems to favor the economic argument; I do not see how his position is tenable under the circumstances. Yes, this is a complicated situation made worse by politics but....these are helpless children without parents and many want to simply "ship" them back to who knows where. Where are our Hoosier hearts? I thought the term Hoosier was synonymous with hospitable.

  3. Illegal aliens. Not undocumented workers (too young anyway). I note that this article never uses the word illegal and calls them immigrants. Being married to a naturalized citizen, these people are criminals and need to be deported as soon as humanly possible. The border needs to be closed NOW.

  4. Send them back NOW.

  5. deport now

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