Environment

Hamilton County officials splash cold water on RiverPlace: Upstream trouble on White River could result from adding fill, overflow channelRestricted Content

December 11, 2006
Chris O\'malley
A government panel is echoing the concerns of the Hoosier Environmental Council that Centre Properties' proposed RiverPlace development along White River at 96th Street could worsen the effects of a flood. The Hamilton County Drainage Board doesn't carry the weight of the U.S. Geological Survey, but its opinion could influence the giant, mixed-use project's chances of winning a rezoning case. A letter the drainage board sent recently to the Fishers planning commission comes just before the Fishers Town Council considers...
More

Residents say safety is a growing concern: Survey: Fewer feel comfortable downtown after darkRestricted Content

December 11, 2006
Cory Schouten
Most central Indiana residents feel safe in downtown Indianapolis when the sun is out, but remain leery of the city at night, according to a study by the IUPUI Department of Tourism, Conventions and Event Management. The annual study, which is designed to gauge the impact of cultural tourism on quality of life, gives the city high marks overall in areas ranging from cultural attractions to cleanliness, public transportation to parking. But it also shows the city has more work...
More

Agreement forces INDOT to clean rest areasRestricted Content

December 4, 2006
Chris O'Malley
Many of Indiana's 36 rest areas have in recent years dumped illegal amounts of ammonia nitrogen and E.coli bacteria into nearby streams, state records show.
More

Marketing firm targets tech types: Seven-figure deal shows DGS' diversification is workingRestricted Content

December 4, 2006
Anthony Schoettle
When DGS Marketing Engineers signed a blockbuster deal this September with one of the nation's largest industrial chemical companies, owners of the ad agency knew making their micro-niche just a little broader was going to pay big dividends. The local marketing and advertising agency recently decided to step outside its super-specific niche of working with companies that make machine tools to target companies working in just about any technical field. "This is a specialized advertising field that goes beyond mere...
More

'Tis the season for small businesses to party on: Close-knit companies more likely to hold holiday celebrations, but more firms of all sizes are getting into the spiritRestricted Content

November 27, 2006
Cory Schouten
While many large companies have decided to scale back holiday parties or give them up entirely in recent years, small businesses continue to spend merrily on the annual gatherings. "They're doing well, making lots of money and want to celebrate with their employees," said Kathy Ray, director of catering at the Indianapolis Marriott Downtown. Employees of small businesses are like families, so it makes sense that those companies would be less likely to eliminate or cut back on holiday get-togethers,...
More

State offers red carpet to ethanol plants despite environmental concernsRestricted Content

November 20, 2006
Chris O'Malley
The Indiana Department of Environmental Management proposes a change in regulations that could reduce the time it takes to approve air permits for ethanol plants. The change would establish industry-specific control standards for emissions.
More

Dixie Chopper survives declining mower market: Zero-turning-radius pioneer rebounds with new unitsRestricted Content

November 20, 2006
Anthony Schoettle
This year was not kind to Dixie Chopper, the company near Greencastle known for making the "world's fastest lawn mower." Selling season is over, and Dixie Chopper sold 12,000 mowers, 3,000 fewer than forecasted. But company founder Art Evans said 2006 wasn't as bad as rumored in the industry. "We're not going bankrupt, we're not upside down financially, and we're not being bought out," Evans said. Dixie Chopper laid off 10 to 15 employees, temporarily cut its workweek from 40...
More

FUNNY BUSINESS: Being your own boss doesn't save you from idiots

November 20, 2006
Mike Redmond
I work at home. Well, I call it work, but really it's just sitting around making fun of things. Which is the same "job" description I used when I "worked" (boy, this is going to date me) at what used to be known as The Daily Newspaper. Nowadays, it's The Manually Delivered User Operated Lifestyle Enhancement Information Platform. Anyway, the good thing about doing whatever I do at home is that I'm free from the tyrannies of the workplace-meetings, idiot...
More

Taking apart PCs, rebuilding lives: Workforce Inc. recycling program helps ex-prisoners prepare for employmentRestricted Content

November 20, 2006
Scott Olson
Timothy Smith spent 22 years behind bars for committing a violent crime he'd rather not talk about. The Indianapolis native released from prison just two months ago cannot stop praising the transitional program meant to help him and other former inmates find jobs and rebuild their lives. "This place has been a godsend for me," Smith said. "Coming out of prison, you don't have much of a job history. It gives you something to look forward to." Smith, who entered...
More

From blankets to burials, trustee work never ends:Restricted Content

November 20, 2006
-Tom Murphy
You can turn to a township trustee for help if a fire leaves you homeless or a hospital stay leaves you penniless. You also look to the office if a dog devours your livestock or you need a fence dispute resolved. Indiana's 1,008 trustees make up the state's largest single group of elected officials, and their lengthy list of duties ranges from the conventional to the odd. Some are charged with destroying "noxious weeds" and "rank vegetation," according to the...
More

Company offers recipe for waste disposal: Sanitec plans to microwave local medical refuseRestricted Content

November 13, 2006
Tom Murphy
A Washington, D.C., company hopes to introduce a method of cooking medical waste with microwaves to the Indianapolis market, which now trucks much of that refuse out of state for safe disposal. Sanitec Industries Inc. has filed plans with the city to install one of its wasteprocessing systems in an empty west-side building. It plans to hire as many as 20 people at the facility to process the redbagged medical waste that flows regularly out of hospitals, and doctor or...
More

BRIAN WILLIAMS Commentary: Indy is ready (and waiting) for rapid transitRestricted Content

November 13, 2006
A new survey demonstrates yet again that community leaders recognize it is time to fix traffic congestion, improve air quality, reduce aggregate fuel use and enhance area accessibility. The study was taken last summer of 377 members of the Lacy Leadership Association, a group of local opinion leaders, by Walker Information, a local market research firm. More than 90 percent of survey respondents indicated that rapid transit is an important component of the solution to these problems. In addition, respondents...
More

Techpoint's new leader sees room to grow: Indiana making progress, but could do better, he saysRestricted Content

November 13, 2006
Scott Olson
Techpoint, a locally based technology trade group that represents the interests of about 330 members statewide, is undergoing a transition in leadership. Jim Jay, 37, has been named interim CEO following the resignation of Cameron Carter, who has led the organization since 2003. Directors should begin a formal search for a permanent replacement the first of the year. Whether Jay lands the top job remains to be seen. But in the meantime, the Butler University graduate with an entrepreneurial spirit...
More

Bridge project not too far for Zionsville firm: Timber-frame specialist has big role in rebuilding Parke County landmarkRestricted Content

November 6, 2006
Scott Olson
The Bridgeton Grist Mill in southern Parke County sat so close to a covered bridge that was destroyed by arson last year that firefighters hosed down the historic structure to keep it from burning, too. The mill, which has churned out flour since 1863, predated by five years the wooden trestle considered one of the most scenic of the 31 covered bridges in the western Indiana county. But a replicated bridge finished in early October resembles the original so closely...
More

Green roofs slow to take root in Indianapolis area: Despite an array of environmental and other benefits, initial costs and lack of incentives put lid on their useRestricted Content

November 6, 2006
Jo Ellen
Green roofs color the skylines in Chicago, Philadelphia, Toronto and other North American cities, but Hoosiers have to look high and low to find similar examples of the plant-filled building tops in Indianapolis. "Most green roofs [in other cities] are on the tops of existing buildings, where here they are [more likely to be found] above an underground parking garage that you might not even be aware is there," said Mark Zelonis, director of the gardens and grounds at the...
More

VOICES FROM THE INDUSTRY: The cost of green building may not be extra after allRestricted Content

November 6, 2006
David A.
It is a question that comes up at every project kickoff meeting, the $64,000 question that every project owner wants to know from Day One-what is it going to cost to design a "green," or sustainable building? Typically, that answer has been somewhere between 3 percent and 5 percent extra to obtain Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, or LEED, certification, the industry's standard for measuring building sustainability. Admittedly, it's not an answer based on years of experience building sustainable...
More

Ponds poo-pooed by more developers: Land prices create need for alternative storm systemsRestricted Content

November 6, 2006
Jennifer Whitson
For years, the model for most local drainage systems-especially in large development sites not directly downtown-has been underground pipes running into a large detention pond. The ponds have dotted the landscape, becoming a perk for office dwellers and homeowners wanting a "lake" view, but raising the concern of many safety officials over the increased risk of drownings. But as new federal rules come into effect requiring not just flood prevention but also filtration of contaminants, more developers may be moving...
More

VOICES FROM THE INDUSTRY: Bringing answers to Indianapolis from around the globeRestricted Content

November 6, 2006
Thaddeus S.
Why should you care how many stamps your architect has in his or her passport? Or whom your architect talks to from around the world? Because, as national publications declare design to be the new driving force in the marketplace, and as that marketplace becomes increasingly global, your architect can offer you a conduit to the people and ideas that will make a difference in your business in the years ahead. Indianapolis-area architects already are working to bring the world...
More

ECONOMIC ANALYSIS: Improving state economy defies simple measuresRestricted Content

November 6, 2006
Patrick Barkey
The replacement of the Indiana Department of Commerce with the privately directed Indiana Economic Development Corp. has been mostly a non-issue in this election season. While most of the fist-pounding, face-reddening rhetoric has been directed at such meaty issues as how long we wait when we go to the BMV office once a year and whether or not we should reset our clocks each spring and fall, the issue of how we go about reinventing and reinvigorating the economy that...
More

St. Francis looks to fill hospice care void: Hospital plans 16-bed facility for south campusRestricted Content

September 25, 2006
Tom Murphy
St. Francis Hospital and Health Centers wants to raise $15 million to add an inpatient hospice to its growing campus on the south side of Indianapolis. The free-standing hospice could house as many as 32 beds for terminally ill patients. Even though most hospice patients receive care in their own homes, hospital officials see the project as a chance to fill a market need and reinforce their system's Franciscan values. "People get caught up, I think, in the definition of...
More

Ivy Tech to host SBDC: State hopes partnership will end instability, help local center shine as consultantRestricted Content

September 25, 2006
Scott Olson
The Central Indiana Small Business Development Center hasn't exactly been a pillar of stability that budding entrepreneurs seeking its advice could emulate. The entity, part of a statewide network of 11 such centers that counsel fledgling businesses, has struggled to find a permanent home-and a capable director-for five years. But state officials, eager to end the strife, have stepped in to lead a reorganization they hope will return the center to prominence within the local small-business community. For starters, Ivy...
More

Malls' redevelopment attracts familiar names: Borders, AMC Theatres among first tenants identifiedRestricted Content

September 25, 2006
Justin Hesser
A mix of familiar stores and upscale retailers will be moving into the nowvacant L.S. Ayres space at Greenwood Park and Castleton Square malls, which owner Simon Property Group Inc. is turning into small-scale lifestyle centers. The open-air developments, which will be similar in design to Carmel's Clay Terrace, have attracted a host of major retailers, including Barnes & Noble, Borders and AMC Theatres. Smaller specialty shops and sit-down restaurants also are planned. Barnes & Noble will be going in...
More

SPORTS Bill Benner: Little-noticed Horizon League prospers and growsRestricted Content

September 18, 2006
Bill Benner
SPORTS Little-noticed Horizon League prospers and grows From his fifth-floor office in Pan Am Plaza, Horizon League Commissioner Jon LeCrone has a view of the Indianapolis skyline. His only wish is that the city would look back. Not at him. At his nine-member league, which will grow to 10 next July when upstate Valparaiso joins Butler in the league's Indiana contingent. Alas, it's a prime example of good news making no news. Or of the media, local and otherwise, determining...
More

Volatile markets aren't as whacky as they seem:Restricted Content

September 18, 2006
Chet Currier
Even in a going-nowhere year like 2006, the ups and downs of the financial markets strike a lot of people as too much. Stock prices, in particular, are constantly described as volatile-swinging in arcs far wider than economic conditions could possibly warrant. Look at emerging markets stocks, which jumped 25 percent in the first few months of this year, then gave the whole gain back again in less than six weeks. These stocks from economies on the frontiers of capitalism,...
More

BEHIND THE NEWS GREG ANDREWS gandrews@ibj.com: With Finish Line stumbling, analysts weigh sale, LBORestricted Content

September 11, 2006
Finish Line Inc.'s fortunes have dimmed so dramatically in recent months that analysts are raising a range of ideas that once seemed farfetched to boost the slumping stock. Among them: taking the company private through a leveraged buyout, or selling it to a larger retailer. The athletic-shoe industry is abuzz that an LBO for Finish Line's struggling rival, New York-based Foot Locker Inc., is already afoot. That company last month hired a financial adviser, just weeks after Women's Wear Daily...
More
Page  << 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 >> pager
Sponsored by
ADVERTISEMENT

facebook - twitter on Facebook & Twitter

Follow on TwitterFollow IBJ on Facebook:
Follow on TwitterFollow IBJ's Tweets on these topics:
 
Subscribe to IBJ
  1. If I were a developer I would be looking at the Fountain Square and Fletcher Place neighborhoods instead of Broad Ripple. I would avoid the dysfunctional BRVA with all of their headaches. It's like deciding between a Blackberry or an iPhone 5s smartphone. BR is greatly in need of updates. It has become stale and outdated. Whereas Fountain Square, Fletcher Place and Mass Ave have become the "new" Broad Ripples. Every time I see people on the strip in BR on the weekend I want to ask them, "How is it you are not familiar with Fountain Square or Mass Ave? You have choices and you choose BR?" Long vacant storefronts like the old Scholar's Inn Bake House and ZA, both on prominent corners, hurt the village's image. Many business on the strip could use updated facades. Cigarette butt covered sidewalks and graffiti covered walls don't help either. The whole strip just looks like it needs to be power washed. I know there is more to the BRV than the 700-1100 blocks of Broad Ripple Ave, but that is what people see when they think of BR. It will always be a nice place live, but is quickly becoming a not-so-nice place to visit.

  2. I sure hope so and would gladly join a law suit against them. They flat out rob people and their little punk scam artist telephone losers actually enjoy it. I would love to run into one of them some day!!

  3. Biggest scam ever!! Took 307 out of my bank ac count. Never received a single call! They prey on new small business and flat out rob them! Do not sign up with these thieves. I filed a complaint with the ftc. I suggest doing the same ic they robbed you too.

  4. Woohoo! We're #200!!! Absolutely disgusting. Bring on the congestion. Indianapolis NEEDS it.

  5. So Westfield invested about $30M in developing Grand Park and attendance to date is good enough that local hotel can't meet the demand. Carmel invested $180M in the Palladium - which generates zero hotel demand for its casino acts. Which Mayor made the better decision?

ADVERTISEMENT