Environment

"No habla ingles": Immigrants who want to advance find many programs to help them learn EnglishRestricted Content

June 5, 2006
Chris O\'malley
No habla inglesImmigrants who want to advance find many programs to help them learn English Osvaldo Escobedo was hungry to learn English. It was bad enough when he couldn't advance at the Nissan Motor Co. plant in Aguascalientes, in central Mexico, because he couldn't converse in the business language of English. Later, when he came to the United States, he couldn't eat much more than what he could pronounce. "When I go to restaurant, I ask [for] 'coffee and doughnuts....
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PROFILE DAVE BROWN: Passion for history, people drives manager's hobbyRestricted Content

June 5, 2006
-Della Pacheco
Instead, Brown transforms himself from a 21st century theater director for the IMAX 3D Theater at White River State Park into a 19th century Civil War soldier as a re-enactor with Indianapolis-based Mid States Living History Association Inc. Brown's interest in the past began as a child. He was fascinated with older people in his small town of Hagerstown, Ind. "I would sit at the old soda fountain in the drugstore and talk to old folks about their lives and...
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School founder traveled challenging road: Before starting Montessori Academy, Cain overcame loss of parents, dyslexia to earn engineering degree, MBARestricted Content

June 5, 2006
Scott Olson
Vivian Cain founded the Montessori Academy of Indianapolis five years ago, but for most of her life, she's been a walking billboard for people striving to overcome obstacles. Cain, 36, operates the private school on the northwest side of Indianapolis. The academy, which Cain started with $40,000 of her personal savings, has grown to 100 students and could expand to include a second location. "When we first started, I opened and closed, and cleaned and cooked," said Cain, who serves...
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Hazmat conference to stress preparation: Topics include corporate readiness, Katrina lessonsRestricted Content

June 5, 2006
Chris O\'malley
Organizers of the Indiana Hazardous Materials & Environmental Safety Conference are hoping Hurricane Katrina's demonstration of mass destruction will be a wake-up call for businesses and communities ill prepared for disaster. Corporate participation in the 18-year-old conference has waned a bit in recent years as hazardous and safety planning became more standardized. Some companies have become too detached after outsourcing their emergency preparation to consultants, said Stephen Nash, chairman of the Indiana Forum for Environmental Safety, which sponsors the June...
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DANIELS' DEAL CLOSERS: IEDC generating jobs, but economy shares part of creditRestricted Content

June 5, 2006
Peter Schnitzler
It would have been big. Just last month, a team of officials from the Indiana Economic Development Corp. and The Indy Partnership, its local equivalent, were furiously negotiating with South Carolinabased fire-engine maker American LaFrance. Intrigued by a mix of economic incentives and Indiana's central location, American LaFrance considered moving its operations to Marion County. In formal negotiations, the company dangled promises of 653 jobs and a capital investment of $18.5 million. State records don't reveal what incentives Indiana offered...
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Plug in professionals when tasks seem overwhelming:Restricted Content

May 29, 2006
Sharon O\'donoghue
Running a small business is daunting, to say the least. Small-business owners wear many hats and are expected to be a master of everything: from hiring workers to coordinating group health coverage, from developing marketing materials to hitting sales goals, from assessing technology needs to making tax and insurance payments, from issuing invoices to paying vendors-all while keeping an eye on cash flow. Whew. Larger businesses may rely on individuals or entire departments responsible for each task. For small-business owners,...
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LEADERSHIP: Consistency key to influencing employees' behaviorRestricted Content

May 29, 2006
CJ McClanahan
Being a leader is not a part-time job. I have worked with many leaders who failed to recognize this truth. In fact, I am sure there have been times throughout my career where I haven't provided the leadership that my team required. The truth is that it's easy to be a great leader when things are going well. When sales are up, profits are growing and customers are happy, it seems that you have all the right answers. You lead...
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BEHIND THE NEWS: Honeymoon period ends for Steak n Shake's CEORestricted Content

May 29, 2006
Greg Andrews
The steakburgers and shakes still taste good, but suddenly the stock is less appetizing. Shares of Steak n Shake Inc. have shed 22 percent of their value since late March, wiping out $122 million in market value. And now CEO Peter Dunn, who had the Midas touch after coming aboard as president in September 2002, is confronting skepticism on Wall Street. "It just seems like something is missing," A.G. Edwards analyst Jack Russo told Dunn during Steak n Shake's quarterly...
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PROFILE ALEX INTERMILL: Life is an ongoing adventure for local attorneyRestricted Content

May 29, 2006
-Della Pacheco
PROFILE ALEX INTERMILL Life is an ongoing adventure for local attorney As an attorney, Alex Intermill is used to the hectic pace of corporate law. So you'd think that in his spare time, he'd just want to kick back and relax. You'd be wrong. The 33-year-old is an environmental and real estate attorney with Indianapolis-based Bose McKinney & Evans as well as the town attorney for Pendleton, in Madison County. He gets his adrenalin pumping by competing in mountain bike...
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Standard Life turns page, rolls with changes: A year after sale, firm improves rating, makes profitRestricted Content

May 29, 2006
Tom Murphy
Standard Life Insurance Company of Indiana has much to celebrate as it passes the one-year anniversary of its sale to Capital Assurance Corp. Profitability, a rating upgrade and product launches all are among the positives the company can tout since it gained new life and left behind old owner Standard Management Corp. last June. Standard Life notched a $15.8 million profit last year, due mostly to a gain from the sale of its life insurance business. Subtract that, though, and...
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SPORTS: Child of city fears demise of program that saved herRestricted Content

May 29, 2006
Bill Benner
You can sense the ache in Rochelle Taylor's heart, the knot in her stomach. She goes to bed at night wondering, "What are we going to do?" She wakes up thinking, "What are we going to do?" Kids are her passion. Not just any kids, but the ones who live in the city neighborhoods ... often underserved, undeserving victims of circumstances into which they were born. And circumstances in which they might remain, unless someone extends a hand. Taylor is...
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BULLS & BEARS: Nation's hefty trade deficit puts value of dollar at riskRestricted Content

May 22, 2006
Ken Skarbeck
Whenever anyone starts talking about foreign currencies and the U.S. dollar, you can usually see eyes-including mine-glazing over. Nevertheless, now may be a particularly useful time for investors to gain awareness on this topic. Currently, a number of wise investment thinkers share a growing concern that the U.S. trade deficit, currently running at an unprecedented 7 percent of GDP (the country's output of goods and services), will eventually trigger a dollar decline. At Berkshire Hathaway's annual meeting a couple of...
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VOICES FROM THE INDUSTRY: Life cycle costing process looks beyond initial priceRestricted Content

May 22, 2006
Terry Greene
The clients of most large contractors are typically as varied as the buildings they have us construct. Some buyers of construction are satisfied if they can simply get a building erected as quickly as possible at the lowest possible costs and are willing to make compromises in quality and workmanship. More sophisticated buyers are increasingly turning to a process called life cycle costing, or LLC. This process takes into consideration not only the initial price, but also the cost of...
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EYE ON THE PIE: Beware cost increases you can't seeRestricted Content

May 22, 2006
Morton Marcus
There I was at the grocery store engaged in economic research. I found a plasticwrapped pack of 24 half-liter bottles of "spring water" from a famous soft drink company was $4.99, or $1.57 per gallon. The store brand for "spring water," packaged in the same fashion, was $3.88, or $1.22 per gallon. A 24-pack of regular or diet 12-ounce soft drinks from the same famous company was selling for $6.49, or $2.97 per gallon. That's just about the price of...
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Stringtown-the next downtown success story?: Trio of real estate investors are betting on the burgRestricted Content

May 22, 2006
Jennifer Whitson
Drive around the roughly 50 blocks of Stringtown, a small, working-class neighborhood on the city's near-west side, and you'll come across some cute, rehabbed, two-bedroom houses for rent. But there are also signs of neglect-boarded-up houses with siding falling off, cars up on blocks, and broken windows. In the neighborhood just west of White River and the Indianapolis Zoo, a few real estate investors are wagering that the tight-knit district is ready to blossom. The burg stretches from the river...
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ECONOMIC ANALYSIS: Good transportation paves the way for strong economyRestricted Content

May 22, 2006
Patrick Barkey
"Like it or not," noted author Richard Florida opined as he looked out over a crowd that recently gathered in Indianapolis to discuss economic development issues in central Indiana, "you are all part of the greater Chicago region." That might come as news to you who pay taxes, follow sports, or subscribe to a newspaper. But the point is well made. In the larger scheme of things-the so-called Shanghai perspective one would take in looking at our economy from the...
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Crown Hill nearing new deal: About 70 acres expected to sell for $5.2MRestricted Content

May 15, 2006
Jennifer Whitson
An announcement on new development for 70 acres of woodlands held by Crown Hill Cemetery and Funeral Home may come within weeks, bringing to a close a controversial land deal that some environmental and neighborhood groups hoped to stall. Crown Hill leadership is talking with three developers that have submitted competing proposals for mixed-use projects, cemetery President Keith Norwalk said. He declined to name the developers or provide details on their proposals but called an announcement "fairly imminent." The price...
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ECONOMIC ANALYSIS: Improving state's economy requires a team approachRestricted Content

May 15, 2006
Patrick Barkey
More than 50 years ago, the famous economist Joseph Schumpeter told a simple story that perfectly captured the essence of market capitalism. It's a turn-of-the-century tale of a railroad being built in a part of the country where none had existed. The new investment rapidly upsets the order of everything-once ideally situated towns are left high and dry, while others move up in stature as they exploit newfound advantages. It's messy and it's painful, but the result is for the...
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Cherrymasters' luck might turn next year: Proponents argue that state regulators could electronically monitor slots in taverns around IndianaRestricted Content

May 15, 2006
Peter Schnitzler
In past years, legislators have proved unwilling to expand gambling outside Indiana's riverboat casinos. But Indiana Licensed Beverage Association Executive Director Brad Klopfenstein, who has been leading the push to legalize electronic "cherrymaster" machines, thinks his luck could soon turn. "The legislators we've talked to, they don't seem to have the steadfast 'no, no, no' attitude they used to have," Klopfenstein said. "We're hoping we'll get a bill filed and it'll get a fair hearing next year." And new technology...
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Jackson Press makes $3 million investment: German-imported UV press puts firm in rare companyRestricted Content

May 8, 2006
Anthony Schoettle
At a time when many commercial printers are proceeding cautiously through a slow recovery, Indianapolis-based Jackson Press Inc. is investing $3 million in its future. Jackson Press on May 1 completed installation of a new German-imported press with digital work flow and a UV lamp system, which allows ink to dry quicker and with more clarity than on a traditional press. "This press gives us much more flexibility, with the ability to print on plastics and other substrates," said Jackson...
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NOTIONS: Readers weigh in on the quest for 'something more'Restricted Content

May 8, 2006
Bruce Hetrick
Two weeks ago, I asked readers whether they'd witnessed what I have: More and more folks wanting "something more" from life and work. And if so, why? And why now? And how might "something more" manifest itself? Many responded-so many that I'll share this week some of the "whethers" and "whys" and next week some of the "hows." I heard from several readers who've dealt with this issue professionally. An Indianapolis placement consultant said, "I talk to people every day,...
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BRIAN WILLIAMS Commentary: Should we invest in ethanol or education?Restricted Content

May 8, 2006
During times of high gasoline prices, the investment made by the Daniels administration in six ethanol plants would seem prudent. The touted benefits of ethanol plants are that they create jobs in rural communities, support Indiana corn growers, improve air quality, and lower dependence on foreign oil. As an Indianapolis resident with little exposure to our farm economy, my first question was, "How do you make ethanol?" Ethanol is made by fermenting and distilling simple sugars like those found in...
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Refiner enjoys oil boom: Calumet Specialty Products sees stock price take offRestricted Content

May 8, 2006
Chris O\'malley
Indianapolis is headquarters for Little Oil-Calumet Specialty Products Partners LP. Few locally have heard of the west-side refining and petroleum products company, let alone of its Jan. 25 initial public stock offering that raised $144 million. Calumet is controlled by an equally obscure group of families that still own the bulk of company shares. Yet shares of little Calumet-sales last year of $1.3 billion-are up 40 percent since the January IPO intended to fuel acquisitions. The appreciation is partly due...
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Boutique high schools could bolster work force: Movement targets students who need extra help and otherwise might not pursue higher educationRestricted Content

May 1, 2006
Chris O\'malley
Two school districts have received pivotal funding for "early college high schools" to prepare secondary students for the rigors of college and give them the opportunity to earn college credits before setting foot on campus. The initiative also could be a plus for area employers to the extent it improves the pool of qualified workers locally. Indianapolis Public Schools' Crispus Attucks Medical Magnet/Early College High School and the Metropolitan School District of Wayne Township's Early College High School each received...
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CHRIS KATTERJOHN Commentary: Textbook cases of entrepreneurismRestricted Content

May 1, 2006
You get an idea; you build a business; you sell it and make a bundle. So it was with the recent deals that took out IBJ's No. 1 and No. 2 fastest-growing companies from 2005, Performance Assessment Network and Suros Surgical. We can bemoan the loss of headquarters, but let's face it, these are the kinds of payoffs most entrepreneurs dream of. In just a little over five short years, PAN investors put up $7.5 million in capital and sold...
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  1. Those of you yelling to deport them all should at least understand that the law allows minors (if not from a bordering country) to argue for asylum. If you don't like the law, you can petition Congress to change it. But you can't blindly scream that they all need to be deported now, unless you want your government to just decide which laws to follow and which to ignore.

  2. 52,000 children in a country with a population of nearly 300 million is decimal dust or a nano-amount of people that can be easily absorbed. In addition, the flow of children from central American countries is decreasing. BL - the country can easily absorb these children while at the same time trying to discourage more children from coming. There is tension between economic concerns and the values of Judeo-Christian believers. But, I cannot see how the economic argument can stand up against the values of the believers, which most people in this country espouse (but perhaps don't practice). The Governor, who is an alleged religious man and a family man, seems to favor the economic argument; I do not see how his position is tenable under the circumstances. Yes, this is a complicated situation made worse by politics but....these are helpless children without parents and many want to simply "ship" them back to who knows where. Where are our Hoosier hearts? I thought the term Hoosier was synonymous with hospitable.

  3. Illegal aliens. Not undocumented workers (too young anyway). I note that this article never uses the word illegal and calls them immigrants. Being married to a naturalized citizen, these people are criminals and need to be deported as soon as humanly possible. The border needs to be closed NOW.

  4. Send them back NOW.

  5. deport now

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