Environment

VIEWPOINT: Consumers should take charge of healthRestricted Content

July 17, 2006
David Lee
In an environment where we're all being asked to pay a larger share of our own health care costs, it's interesting to see how little time we spend thinking about major decisions that have an impact on our health. Like selecting a primary care physician or any medical specialist, for example. According to a recent Managed Care Weekly Digest survey, 67 percent of U.S. adults ages 18-64 said they spent eight hours or more researching an automobile purchase, yet only...
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Westview soldiers on amid health care explosion: Hospital fares well against larger, newer competitionRestricted Content

July 10, 2006
Tom Murphy
A touch-screen directory, a grove of potted trees and a muffin-bearing kiosk greet visitors entering the six-story atrium at the new Clarian North Medical Center in Carmel. A much milder scene awaits people walking into Westview Hospital a few miles away, on the west side of Indianapolis. There, a lonely player piano spills soft tunes into a one-story lobby filled with clusters of chairs and pamphlets on volunteering. "Quiet! Healing in Progress" reads a nearby sign. Indiana's lone osteopathic hospital...
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Williams Creek Consulting Inc.: Consultants engineer 'green' solutions After years of taking any work it could find, company specializes in stormwater issuesRestricted Content

July 3, 2006
Ed Callahan
In development circles, the color green is often associated with money. But it has a different connotation for Indianapolis-based Williams Creek Consulting-an environmental one. Launched in 2002, the firm aims to help developers minimize disruptions to the natural features of a construction site, co-founder Neil Myers said. It specializes in strategies to manage stormwater runoff. "We improve a project by integrating the building into the natural environment," Myers said. That means doing more than digging a series of retention ponds...
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PROFILE: RYAN MCCORMICK: Laughter proves best medicine for cancer survivorRestricted Content

July 3, 2006
-Della Pacheco
PROFILE RYAN MCCORMICK Laughter proves best medicine for cancer survivor When local companies need hazardous materials removed, Ryan McCormick hopes they call Active Environmental Ser vices, an environmental services company based in College Park. McCormick, a part-time comic, has been the sales and marketing manager for the Indianapolis-based company about three months. But two years ago, McCormick faced his own personal hazard when he was diagnosed with non-Hodgkins lymphoma, a form of cancer that attacks the body's lymphatic system. He...
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Patient safety center steers clear of the blame game: New approach modeled after aviation industryRestricted Content

July 3, 2006
Tom Murphy
Indiana hospitals are drawing inspiration from the aviation industry for their latest push to reduce medical errors. The Indiana Patient Safety Center, which opened July 1, will foster a blamefree approach to reporting errors, much like the environment promoted by the Federal Aviation Administration. The result will be a culture that encourages system analysis to fix flaws that lead to an error, rather than one that merely heaps blame on the person who committed it, said Bob Morr, vice president...
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Indianapolis marketing firm plays 'game' to win: Fun environment helps CIK Enterprises earn reputation as a 'best' place to work, inspires employees to give their allRestricted Content

June 26, 2006
Victoria D.
Business is often compared to a game. There are winners and losers, MVPs and benchwarmers, touchdowns and penalties. Only the strong survive. The leaders at Indianapolis-based CIK Enterprises LLC take the competition seriously. But they don't see why it can't be fun, too. CIK's 30,000-square-foot Georgetown Road office, known as "the stadium," features green, blue and orange walls, some of which are rounded. Huge puzzle pieces listing company goals decorate the spacious atrium. A life-size Monopoly board displays monumental moments...
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Employee privacy a sensitive legal issue:Restricted Content

June 26, 2006
Julie Manning
For all businesses, especially small companies, the best way to approach potential legal issues is proactively: spending time crafting policies and procedures today can save significant headaches-and attorney fees-down the road. This is especially true for the thorny issue of privacy in the workplace. While the right to privacy isn't enumerated specifically in the Constitution, it remains a closely guarded prerogative for most Americans. Harris polls consistently show that more than 85 percent of respondents are concerned about the erosion...
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NOTIONS: Gore's film has lessons we should heedRestricted Content

June 26, 2006
Bruce Hetrick
Last Friday night, my friend Cheri and I decided to go out to dinner and a movie. The film we chose wasn't playing near our downtown home. So we had to get in the car and drive 14 miles northwest to Traders Point. As we sat outside at Abuelo's eating and talking, we watched hundreds of cars, trucks and SUVs pass by on 86th Street. This led to a conversation about the environment and the need for mass transit in...
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Ex-Chamber chief buys Daleville testing firm: Deal gives LaMothe one-third ownership, CEO post

June 19, 2006
Matthew Kish
Now, he's an owner himself. This month, he teamed with two prominent executives to buy Dalevillebased Sherry Laboratories, a 180-employee company that does product testing for firms in such fields as aerospace and automotive. "I've been interested in Sherry for about 10 years," LaMothe said. "I had approached them two or three different times ... . I was intrigued with the company because I believed it was needed and necessary and adds value to society." LaMothe will serve as chairman...
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Site gets people involved: Institute uses Web to link volunteers with opportunitiesRestricted Content

June 19, 2006
Scott Olson
When Roger Williams began approaching local not-for-profits early this year about his idea to post their volunteer opportunities for teen-agers on his Web site, many were skeptical. "What's this guy trying to sell me?" they wondered. But six months after launching www.helpindyonline.com, part of his larger Emergent Leadership Institute, Williams has more than 80 charities promoting nearly 300 positions on his site for high school and college students interested in volunteering. The 36-year-old Carmel native and former youth pastor founded...
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Regional partnerships called key to making it: Purdue urges state manufacturers to join supply chainRestricted Content

June 12, 2006
Anthony Schoettle
Growing global competition is bringing local manufacturers together. And the definition of local is changing from around the corner to within 500 miles. Officials from Purdue University have conducted a series of manufacturing summits encouraging Indiana plants to tear down their separatist walls and become an integrated part of regional supply chains. "Supplier-based manufacturing is based on long-term relationships in a 500-mile radius, so we need to think about Indiana manufacturing regionally," said John Sullivan, director of Purdue's Center for...
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RETURN ON TECHNOLOGY: How much freedom is enough? Or too much?Restricted Content

June 12, 2006
Tim Altom
Jams Surowiecki (en.wikipedia.org/ wiki/The_Wisdom_ of_Crowds) would like you to look deeply into your business soul and choose between chaos and high walls. For that matter, so would I. It's a decision worth thinking about. The right choice could remake your enterprise. The wrong one could, too. Surowiecki is just one of several thinkers pondering whether organizations do better with top-down plans, processes and hierarchies, or with loose controls and chaotic creativity. His book, "The Wisdom of Crowds," maintains that large...
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"No habla ingles": Immigrants who want to advance find many programs to help them learn EnglishRestricted Content

June 5, 2006
Chris O\'malley
No habla inglesImmigrants who want to advance find many programs to help them learn English Osvaldo Escobedo was hungry to learn English. It was bad enough when he couldn't advance at the Nissan Motor Co. plant in Aguascalientes, in central Mexico, because he couldn't converse in the business language of English. Later, when he came to the United States, he couldn't eat much more than what he could pronounce. "When I go to restaurant, I ask [for] 'coffee and doughnuts....
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PROFILE DAVE BROWN: Passion for history, people drives manager's hobbyRestricted Content

June 5, 2006
-Della Pacheco
Instead, Brown transforms himself from a 21st century theater director for the IMAX 3D Theater at White River State Park into a 19th century Civil War soldier as a re-enactor with Indianapolis-based Mid States Living History Association Inc. Brown's interest in the past began as a child. He was fascinated with older people in his small town of Hagerstown, Ind. "I would sit at the old soda fountain in the drugstore and talk to old folks about their lives and...
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School founder traveled challenging road: Before starting Montessori Academy, Cain overcame loss of parents, dyslexia to earn engineering degree, MBARestricted Content

June 5, 2006
Scott Olson
Vivian Cain founded the Montessori Academy of Indianapolis five years ago, but for most of her life, she's been a walking billboard for people striving to overcome obstacles. Cain, 36, operates the private school on the northwest side of Indianapolis. The academy, which Cain started with $40,000 of her personal savings, has grown to 100 students and could expand to include a second location. "When we first started, I opened and closed, and cleaned and cooked," said Cain, who serves...
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Hazmat conference to stress preparation: Topics include corporate readiness, Katrina lessonsRestricted Content

June 5, 2006
Chris O\'malley
Organizers of the Indiana Hazardous Materials & Environmental Safety Conference are hoping Hurricane Katrina's demonstration of mass destruction will be a wake-up call for businesses and communities ill prepared for disaster. Corporate participation in the 18-year-old conference has waned a bit in recent years as hazardous and safety planning became more standardized. Some companies have become too detached after outsourcing their emergency preparation to consultants, said Stephen Nash, chairman of the Indiana Forum for Environmental Safety, which sponsors the June...
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DANIELS' DEAL CLOSERS: IEDC generating jobs, but economy shares part of creditRestricted Content

June 5, 2006
Peter Schnitzler
It would have been big. Just last month, a team of officials from the Indiana Economic Development Corp. and The Indy Partnership, its local equivalent, were furiously negotiating with South Carolinabased fire-engine maker American LaFrance. Intrigued by a mix of economic incentives and Indiana's central location, American LaFrance considered moving its operations to Marion County. In formal negotiations, the company dangled promises of 653 jobs and a capital investment of $18.5 million. State records don't reveal what incentives Indiana offered...
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Plug in professionals when tasks seem overwhelming:Restricted Content

May 29, 2006
Sharon O\'donoghue
Running a small business is daunting, to say the least. Small-business owners wear many hats and are expected to be a master of everything: from hiring workers to coordinating group health coverage, from developing marketing materials to hitting sales goals, from assessing technology needs to making tax and insurance payments, from issuing invoices to paying vendors-all while keeping an eye on cash flow. Whew. Larger businesses may rely on individuals or entire departments responsible for each task. For small-business owners,...
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LEADERSHIP: Consistency key to influencing employees' behaviorRestricted Content

May 29, 2006
CJ McClanahan
Being a leader is not a part-time job. I have worked with many leaders who failed to recognize this truth. In fact, I am sure there have been times throughout my career where I haven't provided the leadership that my team required. The truth is that it's easy to be a great leader when things are going well. When sales are up, profits are growing and customers are happy, it seems that you have all the right answers. You lead...
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BEHIND THE NEWS: Honeymoon period ends for Steak n Shake's CEORestricted Content

May 29, 2006
Greg Andrews
The steakburgers and shakes still taste good, but suddenly the stock is less appetizing. Shares of Steak n Shake Inc. have shed 22 percent of their value since late March, wiping out $122 million in market value. And now CEO Peter Dunn, who had the Midas touch after coming aboard as president in September 2002, is confronting skepticism on Wall Street. "It just seems like something is missing," A.G. Edwards analyst Jack Russo told Dunn during Steak n Shake's quarterly...
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PROFILE ALEX INTERMILL: Life is an ongoing adventure for local attorneyRestricted Content

May 29, 2006
-Della Pacheco
PROFILE ALEX INTERMILL Life is an ongoing adventure for local attorney As an attorney, Alex Intermill is used to the hectic pace of corporate law. So you'd think that in his spare time, he'd just want to kick back and relax. You'd be wrong. The 33-year-old is an environmental and real estate attorney with Indianapolis-based Bose McKinney & Evans as well as the town attorney for Pendleton, in Madison County. He gets his adrenalin pumping by competing in mountain bike...
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Standard Life turns page, rolls with changes: A year after sale, firm improves rating, makes profitRestricted Content

May 29, 2006
Tom Murphy
Standard Life Insurance Company of Indiana has much to celebrate as it passes the one-year anniversary of its sale to Capital Assurance Corp. Profitability, a rating upgrade and product launches all are among the positives the company can tout since it gained new life and left behind old owner Standard Management Corp. last June. Standard Life notched a $15.8 million profit last year, due mostly to a gain from the sale of its life insurance business. Subtract that, though, and...
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SPORTS: Child of city fears demise of program that saved herRestricted Content

May 29, 2006
Bill Benner
You can sense the ache in Rochelle Taylor's heart, the knot in her stomach. She goes to bed at night wondering, "What are we going to do?" She wakes up thinking, "What are we going to do?" Kids are her passion. Not just any kids, but the ones who live in the city neighborhoods ... often underserved, undeserving victims of circumstances into which they were born. And circumstances in which they might remain, unless someone extends a hand. Taylor is...
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BULLS & BEARS: Nation's hefty trade deficit puts value of dollar at riskRestricted Content

May 22, 2006
Ken Skarbeck
Whenever anyone starts talking about foreign currencies and the U.S. dollar, you can usually see eyes-including mine-glazing over. Nevertheless, now may be a particularly useful time for investors to gain awareness on this topic. Currently, a number of wise investment thinkers share a growing concern that the U.S. trade deficit, currently running at an unprecedented 7 percent of GDP (the country's output of goods and services), will eventually trigger a dollar decline. At Berkshire Hathaway's annual meeting a couple of...
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VOICES FROM THE INDUSTRY: Life cycle costing process looks beyond initial priceRestricted Content

May 22, 2006
Terry Greene
The clients of most large contractors are typically as varied as the buildings they have us construct. Some buyers of construction are satisfied if they can simply get a building erected as quickly as possible at the lowest possible costs and are willing to make compromises in quality and workmanship. More sophisticated buyers are increasingly turning to a process called life cycle costing, or LLC. This process takes into consideration not only the initial price, but also the cost of...
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  1. Gay marriage is coming, whether or not these bigots and zealots like it or not. We must work to ensure future generations remember the likes of Greg Zoeller like they do the racists of our past...in shame.

  2. Perhaps a diagram of all the network connections of all politicians to their supporters and those who are elite/wealthy and how they have voted on bills that may have benefited their supporters. The truth may hurt, but there are no non-disclosures in government.

  3. I'm sure these lawyers were having problems coming up with any non-religious reason to ban same-sex marriage. I've asked proponents of this ban the question many times and the only answers I have received were religious reasons. Quite often the reason had to do with marriage to a pet or marriage between a group even though those have nothing at all to do with this. I'm looking forward to less discrimination in our state soon!

  4. They never let go of the "make babies" argument. It fails instantaneously because a considerable percentage of heterosexual marriages don't produce any children either. Although if someone wants to pass a law that any couple, heterosexual or homosexual, cannot be legally married (and therefore not utilize all legal, financial, and tax benefits that come with it) until they have produced a biological child, that would be fun to see as a spectator. "All this is a reflection of biology," Fisher answered. "Men and women make babies, same-sex couples do not... we have to have a mechanism to regulate that, and marriage is that mechanism." The civil contract called marriage does NOTHING to regulate babymaking, whether purposefully or accidental. These conservatives really need to understand that sex education and access to birth control do far more to regulate babymaking in this country. Moreover, last I checked, same-sex couples can make babies in a variety of ways, and none of them are by accident. Same-sex couples often foster and adopt the children produced by the many accidental pregnancies from mixed-sex couples who have failed at self-regulating their babymaking capabilities.

  5. Every parent I know with kids from 6 -12 has 98.3 on its car radio all the time!! Even when my daughter isn't in the car I sometimes forget to change stations. Not everybody wants to pay for satellite radio. This will be a huge disappointment to my 9 year old. And to me - there's so many songs on the radio that I don't want her listening to.

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