Environment

Stringtown-the next downtown success story?: Trio of real estate investors are betting on the burgRestricted Content

May 22, 2006
Jennifer Whitson
Drive around the roughly 50 blocks of Stringtown, a small, working-class neighborhood on the city's near-west side, and you'll come across some cute, rehabbed, two-bedroom houses for rent. But there are also signs of neglect-boarded-up houses with siding falling off, cars up on blocks, and broken windows. In the neighborhood just west of White River and the Indianapolis Zoo, a few real estate investors are wagering that the tight-knit district is ready to blossom. The burg stretches from the river...
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ECONOMIC ANALYSIS: Good transportation paves the way for strong economyRestricted Content

May 22, 2006
Patrick Barkey
"Like it or not," noted author Richard Florida opined as he looked out over a crowd that recently gathered in Indianapolis to discuss economic development issues in central Indiana, "you are all part of the greater Chicago region." That might come as news to you who pay taxes, follow sports, or subscribe to a newspaper. But the point is well made. In the larger scheme of things-the so-called Shanghai perspective one would take in looking at our economy from the...
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Crown Hill nearing new deal: About 70 acres expected to sell for $5.2MRestricted Content

May 15, 2006
Jennifer Whitson
An announcement on new development for 70 acres of woodlands held by Crown Hill Cemetery and Funeral Home may come within weeks, bringing to a close a controversial land deal that some environmental and neighborhood groups hoped to stall. Crown Hill leadership is talking with three developers that have submitted competing proposals for mixed-use projects, cemetery President Keith Norwalk said. He declined to name the developers or provide details on their proposals but called an announcement "fairly imminent." The price...
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ECONOMIC ANALYSIS: Improving state's economy requires a team approachRestricted Content

May 15, 2006
Patrick Barkey
More than 50 years ago, the famous economist Joseph Schumpeter told a simple story that perfectly captured the essence of market capitalism. It's a turn-of-the-century tale of a railroad being built in a part of the country where none had existed. The new investment rapidly upsets the order of everything-once ideally situated towns are left high and dry, while others move up in stature as they exploit newfound advantages. It's messy and it's painful, but the result is for the...
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Cherrymasters' luck might turn next year: Proponents argue that state regulators could electronically monitor slots in taverns around IndianaRestricted Content

May 15, 2006
Peter Schnitzler
In past years, legislators have proved unwilling to expand gambling outside Indiana's riverboat casinos. But Indiana Licensed Beverage Association Executive Director Brad Klopfenstein, who has been leading the push to legalize electronic "cherrymaster" machines, thinks his luck could soon turn. "The legislators we've talked to, they don't seem to have the steadfast 'no, no, no' attitude they used to have," Klopfenstein said. "We're hoping we'll get a bill filed and it'll get a fair hearing next year." And new technology...
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Jackson Press makes $3 million investment: German-imported UV press puts firm in rare companyRestricted Content

May 8, 2006
Anthony Schoettle
At a time when many commercial printers are proceeding cautiously through a slow recovery, Indianapolis-based Jackson Press Inc. is investing $3 million in its future. Jackson Press on May 1 completed installation of a new German-imported press with digital work flow and a UV lamp system, which allows ink to dry quicker and with more clarity than on a traditional press. "This press gives us much more flexibility, with the ability to print on plastics and other substrates," said Jackson...
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NOTIONS: Readers weigh in on the quest for 'something more'Restricted Content

May 8, 2006
Bruce Hetrick
Two weeks ago, I asked readers whether they'd witnessed what I have: More and more folks wanting "something more" from life and work. And if so, why? And why now? And how might "something more" manifest itself? Many responded-so many that I'll share this week some of the "whethers" and "whys" and next week some of the "hows." I heard from several readers who've dealt with this issue professionally. An Indianapolis placement consultant said, "I talk to people every day,...
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BRIAN WILLIAMS Commentary: Should we invest in ethanol or education?Restricted Content

May 8, 2006
During times of high gasoline prices, the investment made by the Daniels administration in six ethanol plants would seem prudent. The touted benefits of ethanol plants are that they create jobs in rural communities, support Indiana corn growers, improve air quality, and lower dependence on foreign oil. As an Indianapolis resident with little exposure to our farm economy, my first question was, "How do you make ethanol?" Ethanol is made by fermenting and distilling simple sugars like those found in...
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Refiner enjoys oil boom: Calumet Specialty Products sees stock price take offRestricted Content

May 8, 2006
Chris O\'malley
Indianapolis is headquarters for Little Oil-Calumet Specialty Products Partners LP. Few locally have heard of the west-side refining and petroleum products company, let alone of its Jan. 25 initial public stock offering that raised $144 million. Calumet is controlled by an equally obscure group of families that still own the bulk of company shares. Yet shares of little Calumet-sales last year of $1.3 billion-are up 40 percent since the January IPO intended to fuel acquisitions. The appreciation is partly due...
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Boutique high schools could bolster work force: Movement targets students who need extra help and otherwise might not pursue higher educationRestricted Content

May 1, 2006
Chris O\'malley
Two school districts have received pivotal funding for "early college high schools" to prepare secondary students for the rigors of college and give them the opportunity to earn college credits before setting foot on campus. The initiative also could be a plus for area employers to the extent it improves the pool of qualified workers locally. Indianapolis Public Schools' Crispus Attucks Medical Magnet/Early College High School and the Metropolitan School District of Wayne Township's Early College High School each received...
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CHRIS KATTERJOHN Commentary: Textbook cases of entrepreneurismRestricted Content

May 1, 2006
You get an idea; you build a business; you sell it and make a bundle. So it was with the recent deals that took out IBJ's No. 1 and No. 2 fastest-growing companies from 2005, Performance Assessment Network and Suros Surgical. We can bemoan the loss of headquarters, but let's face it, these are the kinds of payoffs most entrepreneurs dream of. In just a little over five short years, PAN investors put up $7.5 million in capital and sold...
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ECONOMIC ANALYSIS: It's time we get started on a new state economyRestricted Content

May 1, 2006
Patrick Barkey
Have you ever plunked down a lot of money for something and worried if you made the right choice? You have plenty of company. To cope with that insecurity, some of us try to persuade our friends to follow our footsteps. We put forth convincing arguments why our brand of car, or our new electronic gizmo, is really the best thing, and feel comforted and vindicated when they make the same choice we made. For too many years, that simple...
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Right decision crucial for small firms:Restricted Content

April 24, 2006
Barbara Hassell
Of course, trying to be less subjective does not mean you shouldn't consider "fit" with the organization's culture. In a small company, fit can be critical. One way to attempt to reduce early turnover is to use the "realistic job preview," in which prospective employees are given both the positive and negative aspects of the job, as opposed to the traditional approach of "selling" the firm. If individuals aren't going to enjoy the job, it's better to know it before...
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Longtime developer undergoes changes: Shopping centers prove fruitful for Zinkan & BarkerRestricted Content

April 24, 2006
Scott Olson
Stephen Zinkan is one persistent fellow. The veteran real estate developer began knocking on the door of Cincinnati-based The Kroger Co. in the early 1990s, in an attempt to build his firm's portfolio. He and Kelly Flynn had founded Flynn & Zinkan Realty Co. in the early 1980s and carved a niche developing groceryanchored shopping centers. Amid the rejections, Zinkan, 56, implored Kroger to give him its toughest assignment. The corporation relented and handed him property at 71st Street and...
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NASCAR a big deal for IRST: Role as security products provider could be worth $100MRestricted Content

April 24, 2006
Anthony Schoettle
Ingersoll Rand Security Technologies has been named NASCAR's first official provider of security products, a deal that could mean substantial growth for the company's Carmel headquarters and an Indianapolis manufacturing plant, which together already employ 900. IRST is a division of Bermuda-based behemoth Ingersoll-Rand Co., which is better known for agricultural, construction and transportation equipment sold under names such as Bobcat and Thermo King. The link with the racing circuit is expected to drive home the point that Ingersoll-Rand is...
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Tower's leasing power should weather storm: Brokers say One Indiana Square will remain attractiveRestricted Content

April 24, 2006
Scott Olson
Several downtown leasing agents doubt the storm damage incurred at One Indiana Square will have a significant impact on the tower owners' ability to attract future office tenants. In fact, a few contend their quick response to containing the fallout from displaced occupants could even make the building more attractive. "There are a lot of people who never have this challenge put in front of them," said Jeff Harris, president of locally based Meridian Real Estate and a former marketing...
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Real estate experts examine the market: Indianapolis in good shape overall, panelists say, but job growth, incentive issues, among concernsRestricted Content

April 24, 2006
On April 14, as part of its Power Breakfast Series, the Indianapolis Business Journal gathered a panel of commercial real estate and construction experts to discuss industry conditions in the local market. In a discussion moderated by IBJ Editor Tom Harton, panelists took on a wide range of issues, including tax incentives and the status of downtown's residential and retail markets. Power Breakfast guests were Mike Curless, executive vice president and principal with Lauth Property Group; Mike Wells, president of...
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VOICES FROM THE INDUSTRY: New rules make big changes to environmental reportsRestricted Content

April 24, 2006
Robert R.
Every buyer and seller of commercial property is familiar with Phase I environmental reports-the ubiquitous due-diligence requirement for commercial property transactions or financing. When they first began to be used, the work behind the reports-and often the reports themselves-varied greatly in thoroughness and completeness. With the advent of ASTM standards, more uniformity appeared, even if quality remained spotty. The front is about to change dramatically. Recent regulations by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, which take effect in November, have a...
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Suburban residents slow to jump on vanpool bandwagon: Neither cost nor environmental advantages stir the masses; advocate says 'employers need to get smarter'Restricted Content

April 17, 2006
Chris O\'malley
The federally funded Central Indiana Commuter Services has finally won over a dozen workers to share a van to and from work-somewhat of a feat in a region where a vanpool might as well be a bathing option for a conversion van. Besides a vanpool program that runs between Cloverdale and Indianapolis, CICS recently signed on a handful of Fishers residents to share a seven-passenger van between the Hamilton County town and downtown Indianapolis. Lately, CICS has been trying to...
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Keeping up with CEDIA: Group's new boss shares successes, challengesRestricted Content

April 17, 2006
Scott Olson
The locally based Certified Electronics Designers & Installers Association recently selected Don Gilpin as its new executive director. Gilpin, 42, is an eightyear veteran of the trade group and had served as executive vice president. The Minnesota native and Franklin College graduate spoke with IBJ about his appointment and the issues facing the organization. IBJ: As executive director of CEDIA, what is your role? GILPIN: CEDIA has different departments within it, and they range from expo to marketing to legislative...
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Clinic can't pull its weight: Forest Health leaves behind $11M hospitalRestricted Content

April 17, 2006
Tom Murphy
"They're not the most communicative people in the world, so I don't really have a good reason, other than the fact that I think at one point they thought they had a group of doctors to operate the clinic with, and it fell through," said Jack Hogan, a senior vice president for Indianapolis-based Lauth. Forest Health corporate attorney Marie Paratto referred questions to Laurence H. Lenz Jr., an A bariatric surgery center built for roughly $11 million a couple years...
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VOICES FROM THE INDUSTRY: A silent productivity killer: executives with addictionsRestricted Content

April 10, 2006
L. Martin
Productivity losses-every business executive looks for ways to avoid them. Yet, an astonishing $40 billion in productivity gains were lost last year due to preventable selfinflicted behavior. This productivity killer typically openly manifests itself on days like Jan. 2, or more recently, on the Monday after the Super Bowl, when an estimated 1.4 million Americans called in sick after a Sunday of intense partying. A big loser? Indiana's economy This major loss in productivity reflects rapidly growing excessive alcohol use...
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Repairs to tower may take months: Tenants scramble for other arrangementsRestricted Content

April 10, 2006
Peter Schnitzler
It was a symbol of his success. For the last three years, environmental attorney Robert Clark has relished the view from his corner office in One Indiana Square, high above the streets of Indianapolis. But on Sunday, April 2, tornadoforce winds left it in tatters. His family photos are gone. Likewise his case files and the many gifts he'd received over the years from friends or clients. "I understand there are no exterior walls," he said. "My desk is still...
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TAWN PARENT Commentary: Valued employees go the extra mileRestricted Content

April 10, 2006
Tawn Parent is on vacation. In her absence, this column, which appeared on May 9, 2005, is being reprinted. I fought through Castleton traffic recently to pick up a few bottles of wine at Trader Joe's. It was a brand I'd bought before and liked. But the first bottle I opened was spoiled. So was the second bottle. I called Trader Joe's. They said to bring the bottles back. I told them I hadn't saved my receipt. "It doesn't matter,"...
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Shared patient rooms in hospitals soon to be history: Guidelines call for private quarters in all new facilitiesRestricted Content

April 10, 2006
Tracy Donhardt
New guidelines due out in June will call for newly constructed hospitals to come equipped with all private patient rooms, the first time such a minimum requirement has been issued. The guidelines, published every four years by the Facilities Guidelines Institute and the American Institute of Architects' Academy of Health, are used by nearly 40 state governments-including Indiana-to set regulations, approve construction plans and license hospitals to operate. And hospitals nationwide-including those in Indiana-are expected to embrace the guidelines that...
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  1. PJ - Mall operators like Simon, and most developers/ land owners, establish individual legal entities for each property to avoid having a problem location sink the ship, or simply structure the note to exclude anything but the property acting as collateral. Usually both. The big banks that lend are big boys that know the risks and aren't mad at Simon for forking over the deed and walking away.

  2. Do any of the East side residence think that Macy, JC Penny's and the other national tenants would have letft the mall if they were making money?? I have read several post about how Simon neglected the property but it sounds like the Eastsiders stopped shopping at the mall even when it was full with all of the national retailers that you want to come back to the mall. I used to work at the Dick's at Washington Square and I know for a fact it's the worst performing Dick's in the Indianapolis market. You better start shopping there before it closes also.

  3. How can any company that has the cash and other assets be allowed to simply foreclose and not pay the debt? Simon, pay the debt and sell the property yourself. Don't just stiff the bank with the loan and require them to find a buyer.

  4. If you only knew....

  5. The proposal is structured in such a way that a private company (who has competitors in the marketplace) has struck a deal to get "financing" through utility ratepayers via IPL. Competitors to BlueIndy are at disadvantage now. The story isn't "how green can we be" but how creative "financing" through captive ratepayers benefits a company whose proposal should sink or float in the competitive marketplace without customer funding. If it was a great idea there would be financing available. IBJ needs to be doing a story on the utility ratemaking piece of this (which is pretty complicated) but instead it suggests that folks are whining about paying for being green.

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