Environment

Real estate experts examine the market: Indianapolis in good shape overall, panelists say, but job growth, incentive issues, among concernsRestricted Content

April 24, 2006
On April 14, as part of its Power Breakfast Series, the Indianapolis Business Journal gathered a panel of commercial real estate and construction experts to discuss industry conditions in the local market. In a discussion moderated by IBJ Editor Tom Harton, panelists took on a wide range of issues, including tax incentives and the status of downtown's residential and retail markets. Power Breakfast guests were Mike Curless, executive vice president and principal with Lauth Property Group; Mike Wells, president of...
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VOICES FROM THE INDUSTRY: New rules make big changes to environmental reportsRestricted Content

April 24, 2006
Robert R.
Every buyer and seller of commercial property is familiar with Phase I environmental reports-the ubiquitous due-diligence requirement for commercial property transactions or financing. When they first began to be used, the work behind the reports-and often the reports themselves-varied greatly in thoroughness and completeness. With the advent of ASTM standards, more uniformity appeared, even if quality remained spotty. The front is about to change dramatically. Recent regulations by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, which take effect in November, have a...
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Suburban residents slow to jump on vanpool bandwagon: Neither cost nor environmental advantages stir the masses; advocate says 'employers need to get smarter'Restricted Content

April 17, 2006
Chris O\'malley
The federally funded Central Indiana Commuter Services has finally won over a dozen workers to share a van to and from work-somewhat of a feat in a region where a vanpool might as well be a bathing option for a conversion van. Besides a vanpool program that runs between Cloverdale and Indianapolis, CICS recently signed on a handful of Fishers residents to share a seven-passenger van between the Hamilton County town and downtown Indianapolis. Lately, CICS has been trying to...
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Keeping up with CEDIA: Group's new boss shares successes, challengesRestricted Content

April 17, 2006
Scott Olson
The locally based Certified Electronics Designers & Installers Association recently selected Don Gilpin as its new executive director. Gilpin, 42, is an eightyear veteran of the trade group and had served as executive vice president. The Minnesota native and Franklin College graduate spoke with IBJ about his appointment and the issues facing the organization. IBJ: As executive director of CEDIA, what is your role? GILPIN: CEDIA has different departments within it, and they range from expo to marketing to legislative...
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Clinic can't pull its weight: Forest Health leaves behind $11M hospitalRestricted Content

April 17, 2006
Tom Murphy
"They're not the most communicative people in the world, so I don't really have a good reason, other than the fact that I think at one point they thought they had a group of doctors to operate the clinic with, and it fell through," said Jack Hogan, a senior vice president for Indianapolis-based Lauth. Forest Health corporate attorney Marie Paratto referred questions to Laurence H. Lenz Jr., an A bariatric surgery center built for roughly $11 million a couple years...
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VOICES FROM THE INDUSTRY: A silent productivity killer: executives with addictionsRestricted Content

April 10, 2006
L. Martin
Productivity losses-every business executive looks for ways to avoid them. Yet, an astonishing $40 billion in productivity gains were lost last year due to preventable selfinflicted behavior. This productivity killer typically openly manifests itself on days like Jan. 2, or more recently, on the Monday after the Super Bowl, when an estimated 1.4 million Americans called in sick after a Sunday of intense partying. A big loser? Indiana's economy This major loss in productivity reflects rapidly growing excessive alcohol use...
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Repairs to tower may take months: Tenants scramble for other arrangementsRestricted Content

April 10, 2006
Peter Schnitzler
It was a symbol of his success. For the last three years, environmental attorney Robert Clark has relished the view from his corner office in One Indiana Square, high above the streets of Indianapolis. But on Sunday, April 2, tornadoforce winds left it in tatters. His family photos are gone. Likewise his case files and the many gifts he'd received over the years from friends or clients. "I understand there are no exterior walls," he said. "My desk is still...
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TAWN PARENT Commentary: Valued employees go the extra mileRestricted Content

April 10, 2006
Tawn Parent is on vacation. In her absence, this column, which appeared on May 9, 2005, is being reprinted. I fought through Castleton traffic recently to pick up a few bottles of wine at Trader Joe's. It was a brand I'd bought before and liked. But the first bottle I opened was spoiled. So was the second bottle. I called Trader Joe's. They said to bring the bottles back. I told them I hadn't saved my receipt. "It doesn't matter,"...
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Shared patient rooms in hospitals soon to be history: Guidelines call for private quarters in all new facilitiesRestricted Content

April 10, 2006
Tracy Donhardt
New guidelines due out in June will call for newly constructed hospitals to come equipped with all private patient rooms, the first time such a minimum requirement has been issued. The guidelines, published every four years by the Facilities Guidelines Institute and the American Institute of Architects' Academy of Health, are used by nearly 40 state governments-including Indiana-to set regulations, approve construction plans and license hospitals to operate. And hospitals nationwide-including those in Indiana-are expected to embrace the guidelines that...
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BRIAN WILLIAMS Commentary: Legislators should address insurance costsRestricted Content

April 10, 2006
Members of the Indiana General Assembly resolved some contentious issues in 2006, including property tax relief, telecommunications reform and the long-term leasing of public infrastructure. U n f o r t u n a t e l y, they did not have an opportunity to debate Senate Bill 124, which, if measured on the basis of the value per page, would have exceeded the much-heralded "Major Moves" transportation initiative. Introduced by Sen. Beverly Gard, a Greenfield Republican who has been...
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Tourism's new buzz: Product development: Officials want to build on Indiana's unique assetsRestricted Content

April 3, 2006
Matthew Kish
Billboards in southern Indiana used to tug spelunkers in four different directions. Come to Marengo Caves. Spend an afternoon at Bluespring Caverns. Visit Wyandotte Caves. Don a headlamp at Squire Boone Caverns. Two years ago, however, operators at the four attractions decided it might be a better use of cash to market the area as a single attraction. They pooled their advertising budgets and printed a brochure that listed all four destinations. They also created a passport that visitors could...
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City gives cultural trail green light: Long-anticipated project could cost $35M to $42MRestricted Content

April 3, 2006
Matthew Kish
The long-discussed trail will loop through downtown and cost $35 million to $42 million. All the money will come from federal transportation dollars and private contributions. "The trail has been officially approved," said Brian Payne, president of the Central Indiana Community Foundation, the project's lead managing partner. "It's definitely a project that's going to happen now." Tourism officials greeted the news with enthusiasm. It's a "huge win for White River State Park as well as the city," said Bob Whitt,...
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Indiana Avenue looks for revival: Cultural plan: stresses retail, residential growth, and a possible extensionRestricted Content

April 3, 2006
Scott Olson
Indiana Avenue looks for revival Cultural plan stresses retail, residential growth, and a possible extension Indiana Avenue's glory days as a haven for black-owned businesses and vibrant nightclubs exists only in the history books. But a plan to revitalize the city's newest cultural district could restore some of the luster. City leaders completed the blueprint for redevelopment early this year and now are in the early stages of executing a plan that organizers say could take 20 years to play...
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VIEWPOINT: 'Eating our young' as a way of mentoring?Restricted Content

March 27, 2006
Tim Mulherin
I recently came across an insightful publication by the Center for the Development of Peace and Well-Being at the University of California, Berkley, called Greater Good. One article especially caught my attention: "Inspiring Good Work" (spring-summer 2005 issue) by researchers Wendy Fischman and Howard Garner, of Harvard University's GoodWork Project. As highlighted in the article, the GoodWork Project's research, under way for the past decade, has revealed that young people leaving college and embarking on their professional careers are finding...
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VOICES FROM THE INDUSTRY: Green building trend should be here to stayRestricted Content

March 27, 2006
Fred Green
Trends come and go all the time in the architecture and construction fields. But one movement that is proving to be steadfast and is gaining momentum is called "green architecture." Simply stated, it is the effort to minimize the effect of new and refurbished buildings on their environment. The green approach to building design is often seen by many as merely focusing on the recycling of building materials, but in fact addresses multiple aspects of the construction process. Green design...
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STATEHOUSE DISPATCH: Short but historic session produces election plot linesRestricted Content

March 27, 2006
Ed Feigenbaum
You can go home now (unless you live in Perry Township) and rest somewhat assured that the governor and state lawmakers won't do anything untoward to you until, at the soonest, November. Yes, the 2006 short session of the Indiana General Assembly has run its course, and left the state with some key policy and economic legacies. Not the least of them, as we have discussed at length in this column, and has been covered elsewhere in these pages, are...
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IDEM pollution fines fall: Violators assessed lowest amount since '99, but Daniels administration speeds up processRestricted Content

March 27, 2006
Chris O\'malley
Under Republican control for the first time in 16 years, the Indiana Department of Environmental Management in 2005 handed out $2.03 million in fines for pollution violations, the lowest annual assessment since at least 1999. The 2005 penalties were down nearly $600,000 from a year earlier, when the department was under the administration of Gov. Joe Kernan. But IDEM records show Gov. Mitch Daniels' team had comparatively little patience for unresolved cases, in which the commission and alleged violators couldn't...
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Art Institute students face changing world of design: Businesses should keep interior designers in demandRestricted Content

March 27, 2006
Tracy Donhardt
Facing an expanding world of corporate rebranding, homier hospital rooms and high-tech theaters in every suburb, students entering the field of interior design know they'll be doing more than redecorating high-end homes. What once was considered predominantly a luxury service for wealthy homeowners wanting to expand their drawing rooms, interior design became a necessity in business years ago. Today, a majority of interior designers handle both residential and commercial work. And a growing number of firms that specialize in commercial...
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Steel Dynamics seeks part of former Olin site: Metal recycling operation would serve expanding Hendricks County millRestricted Content

March 27, 2006
Tammy Lieber
The site of the former Olin Brass factory on the near-west side might soon roar to life again if a plan to erect a metal recycling operation there comes through. A joint venture between Fort Waynebased Steel Dynamics Inc., Chicagobased Metal Management Inc. and local hauler Ray's Trash is seeking city approval to install a metal shredder and recycling operation on about 40 acres at Holt Road and Airport Expressway. The venture, called Metal Dynamics LLC, would accept scrap metal...
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TOM HARTON Commentary: Kids were pawns in an adult gameRestricted Content

March 27, 2006
Judge S. Hugh Dillin is dead, but the negative consequences of his school desegregation orders are still with us. Dillin, who died March 13, didn't invent white flight, suburban sprawl or broken urban school systems, but if those problems were smoldering in 1970s Indianapolis, Dillin's decisions poured gasoline on the fire. This column is not a diatribe against Dillin. His decisions were only interpretations of the law, after all, and the highest court in the land affirmed them. Based on...
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VOICES FROM THE INDUSTRY: Mediocre planning efforts don't invite people to stayRestricted Content

March 27, 2006
Don Altemeyer
Analysts say the housing market is slowing in Indianapolis and across the nation. Perhaps that's why three significant, real estate developments have attracted so much local media coverage recently. In one story, the City-County Council approved the development of 28 condos in Broad Ripple, despite strong resistance from the neighborhood association. Meanwhile, local planning councils easily approved two new developments-a subdivision on the far northeast side of town that will feature almost 2,000 homes and a large condominium complex in...
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Mega-hotel on city agenda: Pan Am Plaza possible site for 800-room developmentRestricted Content

March 20, 2006
Matthew Kish
The city is looking for developers interested in adding 800 hotel rooms downtown, a project that could be accomplished by building a massive, new hotel or augmenting several existing facilities. Insiders say a new hotel is most likely. They picture it on Pan Am Plaza. If that happens, the hotel would become the city's largest-eclipsing the Indianapolis Marriott by almost 200 rooms. Ideally, the rooms would be available by 2010, when the wraps come off the expanded Indiana Convention Center....
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CHRIS KATTERJOHN Commentary: 'Dallas'-like TV hit in our future?Restricted Content

March 20, 2006
Just as the popular prime-time soap opera "Dallas" emerged from Texas oil-industry lore, "Indiana" someday could become a mega-hit on television. After, that is, the state becomes the "Texas of biofuels" and the lurid, steamy tales of Big Biofuel begin to play out. I'm not sure who came up with "Texas of biofuels," but the analogy surfaced after the recent announcement that the world's largest soybean processing plant and biodiesel facility will be built in northern Indiana. With this project,...
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Hospitality madness: City wants to grow reputation as Final Four's ideal siteRestricted Content

March 20, 2006
Matthew Kish
Bill Evans' phone rang at 11 p.m. It was a basketball team. The players wanted milkshakes. He popped up like he was bouncing on one of those mini-trampolines mascots use to dunk basketballs at halftime. He tapped his partner on the shoulder. They rolled two coolers to the downtown Steak n Shake. He ordered milkshakes. Large ones. Two for each player. They put the shakes in the coolers and rolled them through the downtown night to the team hotel. The...
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Short session long on action: Led by Major Moves, telecom successes, biz interests fared well in 2006 General AssemblyRestricted Content

March 20, 2006
In less than three months, the Indiana General Assembly approved a pair of blockbuster economic-development measures designed to dramatically upgrade the state's infrastructure. With the passage of Gov. Mitch Daniels' Major Moves initiative, Indiana will lease the Indiana Toll Road to an Australian-Spanish consortium for 75 years. It will use the upfront, $3.9 billion payment to build roads. Meanwhile, the approval of telecom deregulation sets the stage for more local phone, cable and Internet competition. Daniels, a Republican, argued that...
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  1. I am so impressed that the smoking ban FAILED in Kokomo! I might just move to your Awesome city!

  2. way to much breweries being built in indianapolis. its going to be saturated market, if not already. when is enough, enough??

  3. This house is a reminder of Hamilton County history. Its position near the interstate is significant to remember what Hamilton County was before the SUPERBROKERs, Navients, commercial parks, sprawling vinyl villages, and acres of concrete retail showed up. What's truly Wasteful is not reusing a structure that could still be useful. History isn't confined to parks and books.

  4. To compare Connor Prairie or the Zoo to a random old house is a big ridiculous. If it were any where near the level of significance there wouldn't be a major funding gap. Put a big billboard on I-69 funded by the tourism board for people to come visit this old house, and I doubt there would be any takers, since other than age there is no significance whatsoever. Clearly the tax payers of Fishers don't have a significant interest in this project, so PLEASE DON'T USE OUR VALUABLE MONEY. Government money is finite and needs to be utilized for the most efficient and productive purposes. This is far from that.

  5. I only tried it 2x and didn't think much of it both times. With the new apts plus a couple other of new developments on Guilford, I am surprised it didn't get more business. Plus you have a couple of subdivisions across the street from it. I hope Upland can keep it going. Good beer and food plus a neat environment and outdoor seating.

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