Environment

Kipps Brothers still evolving after 125 years

October 24, 2005
Candace Beaty
Walk through the Kipp Brothers showroom and you’ll find the makings of one heck of a birthday celebration: gag gifts galore, endless sugary treats and headgear that puts the traditional party hat to shame.
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Trying to strike oil in public markets: Indianapolis-based Calumet Specialty Products files for IPO, hopes to raise $140 millionRestricted Content

October 17, 2005
Tom Murphy
An Indianapolis-based oil company with ties to a wealthy local family plans to go public in what analysts describe as a hot-butvolatile market. Calumet Specialty Products Partners LP wants to raise $140 million by selling 6.4 million units at an expected price of $22 each, according to papers filed this month with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. Calumet has been part of the private business empire of the Fehsenfeld family, which 35 years ago founded Heritage Environmental Services, a...
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TOM HARTON Commentary: Luring people with bricks, mortarRestricted Content

October 10, 2005
A parking garage is about to rise on a vacant lot at 120 E. Washington St. It's ironic that a block or so west of the site, a group of architects, city planners, real estate developers and leaders of the city's arts movement meet on a regular basis to plot against such garages. The garage in the works isn't just any garage. In its current design, which is yet to be approved, it's only a garage. No ground-floor retail. Just...
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Backing home again: CID changes out-of-state course, invests $50M in IndianaRestricted Content

October 10, 2005
Peter Schnitzler
Indiana's flagship venture capital firm has changed direction. Often criticized for not investing frequently enough within state lines, CID Equity Partners over the last five years has quietly put nearly $50 million to work in 10 Indiana companies. In the decade before, CID invested in just a half-dozen local deals. And after struggling to weather the 2001 recession, CID's managers believe the wind is finally at their back. Three years ago, massive losses threatened to sink the firm. Since then,...
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ECONOMIC ANALYSIS: Economy likely to purr on despite hurricane mayhemRestricted Content

October 10, 2005
Patrick Barkey
Did your company miss its earnings targets last period? Or did your household spend a little too much on your last vacation? Or maybe you've just added a few extra pounds on your waistline recently. Then you should do what just about everyone else is doing-blame it on Katrina. It seems as if every disappointing result in the economy is being blamed on the big storms that have rolled in from the Gulf of Mexico in the last six weeks....
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EYE ON THE PIE: Is our child care 'industry' up to snuff?Restricted Content

October 3, 2005
Morton Marcus
Recently, I have been part of a study for the Indiana Child Care Fund. It has been a learning experience. The first thing I learned is that virtually nothing is known about child care. We do not really know how many child care facilities exist in Indiana. Data from the U.S. Bureau of the Census suggest there are more than 16,000. However, fewer than 5,800 are licensed or recognized by the state. In addition, there are informal child care arrangements...
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Are you prepared for DISASTER?: Despite warnings, many businesses fail to plan for the worstRestricted Content

September 26, 2005
Scott Olson
Are you prepared for Despite warnings, many businesses fail to plan for the worst Frank Hancock didn't have a disasterrecovery plan when a tornado tore past his east-side printing company two years ago, causing $5 million in damage. Severe wind gusts from the Sept. 20, 2003, storm shredded Sport Graphics Inc.'s 5-month-old warehouse and manufacturing facility and tore 13 1,800-pound air-conditioning units from the roof, dumping them on the parking lot below. One was never recovered. Amid the mayhem that...
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TAWN PARENT Commentary: Big hankering for the Big EasyRestricted Content

September 26, 2005
Once you've lived in New Orleans, you never really leave. A part of you stays on. You don't feel quite whole again except when you return. Then it's like regaining an appendage you had learned to live without, but suddenly realize how much you have missed. Transfixed by events there over the past month, I have been missing that part of me I left behind in 1996 when I drove a U-Haul north after three years as a reporter and...
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RETURN ON TECHNOLOGY: Logic puzzles not best way to grade techiesRestricted Content

September 19, 2005
Tim Altom
All my life, wellmeaning people have tried to get me interested in chess. It's not like I don't know the game; I do. It's just that it bores me. I tell them I'll take up chess when the rules are changed to allow the queen to conspire with the bishops to have the knights assassinate the king. Most such games bore me. Card games, even poker, seem insipid. There's nothing at stake but money, after all. Logic puzzles leave me...
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City Market plans raising concerns: Coming renovations worry some tenantsRestricted Content

September 19, 2005
Tammy Lieber
Renovation plans for City Market intended to boost sales at the downtown landmark have some tenants concerned about what it will cost them. In early January, the market's management expects to begin work on $350,000 worth of lighting and flooring improvements in the historic main hall. Tenants will be permanently moved, with preparedfood stands along the perimeter of the building and retail stands in the center. And stands will sport a uniform look. Individual tenants will bear most, if not...
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Private high school set: Cristo Rey to open downtown with 46 companies behind itRestricted Content

September 19, 2005
Anthony Schoettle
A private high school that relies on business participation, the first of its kind in Indiana, is set to open downtown in the fall of 2006. A work-study program designed to help lowincome students pay for tuition and give them corporate work experience is what will set Providence Cristo Rey High School apart from its private and public counterparts throughout the state. Corporate sponsors said it will also give promising students a local business connection, which could help keep them...
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Libraries book on Plainfield duo's automation software:Restricted Content

September 19, 2005
-Tracy Donhardt
Rob Cullin and Rodd Cutler thought there must be a way to adapt their knowledge of factory-automation technology to libraries, even though the two industries appeared worlds apart. Turns out, automation is automation, Cullin says. By developing the right software, just about anything can be automated and made more efficient. Cullin, who had worked with Cutler for years, was downsized by the company they worked for about five years ago, but wanted to keep his hands in technology. "I had...
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Giving office furniture a lift: Pointman Organizer provides users two desks in oneRestricted Content

September 19, 2005
-Scott Olson
It looks like an average, yet stylish, office desk. But press a button and a hutch automatically rises from the back, exposing a flat-panel monitor, speakers, a printer and storage areas. Press the button again and the hutch descends, providing wide-open work space. The desk is the first product available from upstart Arise Innovations Inc. Partners Tom Doane, 39, and Jeffrey Hallal, 48, have a patent pending on the design and have sold production rights to Jasper based Inwood Office...
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Interest high for soon-to-be-shuttered foundry: Size, location make redevelopment promisingRestricted Content

September 19, 2005
Tammy Lieber
When the workers at DaimlerChrysler Corp.'s Indianapolis Foundry clock out for the last time at the end of the month, they'll leave behind 756,000 square feet of factory space, tons of equipment, and more than 52 acres of industrial land on the city's west side. Rather than becoming a rusting industrial relic along Interstate 70, however, the buildings will be razed and real estate experts expect the land will soon find a new use, albeit likely not for a factory....
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EYE ON THE PIE: Use property tax to boost investmentRestricted Content

September 19, 2005
Morton Marcus
I walked a little more than two miles recently on the Monon Trail. This probably surprises those who know me. But even the most slothful will, on occasion, rise from the recliner and not go to the refrigerator. The Monon Trail runs from 10th Street in Indianapolis to 146th Street in Carmel. That's about 20 miles. It follows the route the Monon Railroad abandoned in 1987. It has been identified as a model for other rails-to-trails programs. The trail is...
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Can ride sharing retain your distant workers?: Companies look to car- and van-pooling to counter high gas prices that may increase employee turnoverRestricted Content

September 12, 2005
Chris O\'malley
Most concerned about higher commuting costs are employers on the periphery of Indianapolis, where there is little or no bus transportation for workers who live in Marion County. "At some point, for an hourly worker, it becomes cost-prohibitive to drive to Plainfield for work," said Kim Woodward, director of human resources for Brightpoint Inc. The wireless phone distributor has a warehouse in the Hendricks County town that employs 611, plus about 100 contract workers. "Public transportation is not readily available,"...
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VOICES FROM THE INDUSTRY: Efficient, tasteful design can help maximize productivityRestricted Content

September 5, 2005
Sandi Kramer
Productivity. Comfort. Longevity. While the old saying about location applies to most commercial real estate decisions, the issues of promoting productivity, providing a comfortable working environment and choosing materials that last become preeminent after the lease is signed. current space-is not something you do everyday. If you're part of a mid-sized or small business, then it's highly likely that you're juggling real estate decisions at the same time you're trying to advance your business. As a result of this pressure,...
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Contractors work to resurrect historic church: Buggs Temple being rebuilt from inside out into entertainment venueRestricted Content

September 5, 2005
Tammy Lieber
When a team of developers took on the renovation of downtown's Buggs Temple in fall 2003, most windows in the historic church were missing, the roof was riddled with holes, and much of the sanctuary floor was in the basement. Almost two years later, it's difficult to gauge the progress of the project by sight. The floor is entirely gone, as are the balcony, the doors and the few windows that remained. In that time, however, the building on West...
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ECONOMIC ANALYSIS: Rising health care costs killing jobs and incomeRestricted Content

September 5, 2005
Patrick Barkey
Most of us have been in a doctor's office, and many of us have had conditions that require treatment. But few of us are likely to hear any information presented on the cost of different treatment options along with their benefits, especially if we are one of the 170 million people covered by employer- or governmentprovided health insurance. It is an amazing fact that nearly $3 trillion of health care goods and services are ordered off a menu that has...
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VOICES FROM THE INDUSTRY: Proper stormwater management saves money in long run Property owners should consider alternative methods for site developmentRestricted Content

September 5, 2005
Fred Green
To save themselves from unforeseen trouble down the road, buyers of site-development and buildingdesign services would be wise to consider the joint efforts of an experienced architectural firm working in tandem with an environmental consultant. The reason is fairly simple: Architects are trained to have knowledge in so many diverse and ever-changing subjects that the singular expertise of an environmental consultant can provide significant support in an area still quite new to many designers. While working with restrictive rules and...
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Pervious concrete usage expected to rise in Indiana: Product touted as friendlier to environment, developersRestricted Content

September 5, 2005
Tracy Donhardtreporter
"That's called bioaugmentation," said Pat Kiel, executive director of the Indiana Ready Mix Concrete Association. "Concrete science meets bioscience." Nearly 90 percent of pollutants are typically carried by the first 1-1/2 inches of a daily rainfall into rivers and streams, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The EPA requires that the first threefourths of an inch of rain each day be maintained on site until treated. Typically, most of that water, which includes "first flush" contaminants, is collected in...
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BEHIND THE NEWS: Here's a Blues performance that won't get you downRestricted Content

September 5, 2005
Greg Andrews
Anthem Inc.'s $1.9 billion initial public offering in late 2001 set all kinds of records. It was the biggest IPO for a U.S. health care company ever, and the biggest IPO for a Hoosier company of any kind. But that company, now known as WellPoint Inc., was puny compared with its size today. Then, it had a market value of $3.9 billion; now, thanks to acquisitions and a surging stock price, it's worth $45 billion. WellPoint shares were trading last...
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VOICES FROM THE INDUSTRY: The world might be flat, but construction costs aren'tRestricted Content

September 5, 2005
Don Altemeyer
For the most part, construction has been a local story, a story about local workers building buildings in our community. But the story isn't so local anymore. Global economic forces have begun to intersect with local issues at the construction site. The result: a significant and ongoing increase in construction costs across central Indiana and the rest of the United States-an increase that shows no signs of slowing. Through the first quarter of 2004, construction costs increased at a calm...
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Architects from 3 states to showcase work at event: City welcomes AIA's Ohio Valley Region conventionRestricted Content

September 5, 2005
Tracy Donhardtreporter
The convention kicks off with a shotgun golf outing Sept. 14 at Pebble Brook Golf Club. After golf, attendees can tour five downtown architectural firms. Workshops that begin the next day will follow three tracks of programs-design, community projects and professional development, Kunce said. They will cover a variety of topics including starting a practice, building code requirements, civic initiatives and design- About 250 architects from Ohio, Kentucky and Indiana will converge downtown Sept. 14-17 when Indianapolis hosts the American...
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Ethanol fuel pumps may debut here by '06: Still no place for the masses to buy E85, despite interest in the alternative to gasolineRestricted Content

August 29, 2005
Chris O\'malley
Even though Indiana is one of the nation's biggest growers of corn-the key ingredient in cheaper-than-gasoline ethanol-not a single ethanol pump is available to the average motorist in the Indianapolis area. That twisted irony in a day of record gasoline prices may soon be no more, with a handful of central Indiana gas stations likely to start offering an ethanol alternative-known as E85-by yearend, according to proponents of the fuel. "I hope by Christmas to have a couple in the...
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  1. So as I read this the one question that continues to come to me to ask is. Didn't Indiana only have a couple of exchanges for people to opt into which were very high because we really didn't want to expect the plan. So was this study done during that time and if so then I can understand these numbers. I also understand that we have now opened up for more options for hoosiers to choose from. Please correct if I'm wrong and if I'm not why was this not part of the story so that true overview could be taken away and not just parts of it to continue this negative tone against the ACA. I look forward to the clarity.

  2. It's really very simple. All forms of transportation are subsidized. All of them. Your tax money already goes toward every single form of transportation in the state. It is not a bad thing to put tax money toward mass transit. The state spends over 1,000,000,000 (yes billion) on roadway expansions and maintenance every single year. If you want to cry foul over anything cry foul over the overbuilding of highways which only serve people who can afford their own automobile.

  3. So instead of subsidizing a project with a market-driven scope, you suggest we subsidize a project that is way out of line with anything that can be economically sustainable just so we can have a better-looking skyline?

  4. Downtowner, if Cummins isn't getting expedited permitting and tax breaks to "do what they do", then I'd be happy with letting the market decide. But that isn't the case, is it?

  5. Patty, this commuter line provides a way for workers (willing to work lower wages) to get from Marion county to Hamilton county. These people are running your restaurants, hotels, hospitals, and retail stores. I don't see a lot of residents of Carmel working these jobs.

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