Environment

Charter school leaving train station location for its own 'empowerment center':Restricted Content

April 18, 2005
-Andrea Muirragui
21st Century Charter School is pulling away from Union Station. Nearly three years after reinventing 17,000 square feet of space that once housed a bar and Hooter's restaurant, school sponsor Greater Educational Opportunities Foundation has plans to build a stand-alone facility about five miles to the north. GEO has agreed to buy a two-acre parcel at 25th Street and Capitol Avenue that was to be the site of the Fall Creek Retail Center, an ill-fated project that fell apart in...
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Smoking warriors expand battlefield: Health advocates accuse grocers, retailers of misleading public with smoke-free claimsRestricted Content

April 11, 2005
Chris O\'malley
Bars and restaurants aren't the only firms that will soon feel the heat from health advocates pushing laws to ban smoking in public places. Some are broadening their gaze to drugstores and even supermarkets as potential health risks-and they're naming names of offending businesses. It's a radical approach in a mildmannered metro area, where few dare to poke fingers in the eyes of the business or political elite. And it's in stark contrast to groups such as Smoke Free Indy,...
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SPORTS: Two cities, eight teams and miles of observationsRestricted Content

April 11, 2005
Bill Benner
ST. INDIANAPOLIS-OK, an explanation of the goofy dateline. I have just finished shuttling back and forth between St. Louis for the NCAA Men's Final Four and Indy for the NCAA Women's Final Four. Because of a speaking engagement in St. Louis and an obligation back here on the front end, I made three round trips in six days, covering 1,500 miles. It was worth it. Six games over four days resulting in two national champions, the University of North Carolina...
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IUPUI discovers Office for Women still needs to exist: Program uses workshops, discussions and awards to keep the issues affecting women in the forefrontRestricted Content

April 11, 2005
Ethan Bartanen
While many universities have programs dedicated to women's equality, the IUPUI Office for Women is not taken for granted by the administration there. "It is important as part of the university's diversity department," said Kathy Grove, director of the IUPUI Office for Women. "It helps women to fulfill their potential and ensure that we have an environment free of harassment based on gender." Established in October 1996 under the leadership of Dr. Kathleen Warfel, who was a professor of pathology...
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Are you tough enough?: Women learn how to be hardy so they can compete with the guys in any field of endeavorRestricted Content

April 11, 2005
Kathy Maeglin
Dr. Mary Reilly sometimes gets emotional on the job. But the emergency physician also knows how to turn it off. "In the middle of a 'code,' I can't be breaking down in tears," said Reilly, who works with Indianapolis-based St. Vincent Emergency Physicians Inc. "I put a wall up in some situations and try not to think about these people as people. That's the only way emotionally I can get through [it]." Reilly is among the many women who've learned...
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TOM HARTON Commentary: Riding the rails from first to worstRestricted Content

April 11, 2005
When my grandparents took the interurban from Rushville to Indianapolis to see the 1920 Indianapolis 500, they probably didn't appreciate how lucky they were to live in a state that was a leader in public transportation. Indiana had one of the earliest and most extensive interurban systems in the country. The state's electric railway network converged at the Indianapolis Traction Terminal, thought to be the largest interurban station in the world. The massive building on West Market Street served 462...
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CHRIS KATTERJOHN Commentary: Keep lights on at the StatehouseRestricted Content

April 4, 2005
CHRIS KATTERJOHN Commentary Keep lights on at the Statehouse Every morning I wake up happy that my job doesn't require getting things through the Indiana General Assembly. I don't have that kind of patience, and I'm not cut out to deal with that much frustration. I understand that big issues take time to be resolved and that compromise rarely happens overnight, but for a few issues that everyone seemed to agree were critical from the outset, the time it's taking...
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Sweet Spot: Local philanthropists plan $15M chocolate facility on Indianapolis' north sideRestricted Content

March 28, 2005
Stacey McArthur
Local philanthropists plan $15M chocolate facility on Indianapolis' north side Two local philanthropists have bought 51 percent of Endangered Species Chocolate Co., based in Talent, Ore., and plan to move production of the company's gour met dark chocolate to Indianapolis. Randy Deer and Wayne Zink, founders of the Back Home Again Foundation, paid $3 million in January for majority control of Endangered Species and plan to invest another $15 million in a manufacturing facility and new marketing strategy. "We wanted a...
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Rehabs help schoolhouses rock: Threatened properties receive new life as apartmentsRestricted Content

March 28, 2005
Tammy Lieber
As several local developers have discovered, some of the functional design aspects of school buildings also make attractive components of a successful apartment building. At least two north-side elementary schools closed by Indianapolis Public Schools in the early 1980s have been transformed into apartment communities, and another developer has found a niche turning old high schools in some of the state's smaller cities into senior housing. By keeping the historic character of the buildings and serving a lower-income population, these...
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National lobbyist meets with gov: Small-business advocate says health care is still the toughest issue for ownersRestricted Content

March 28, 2005
Scott Olson
The National Federation of Independent Business is the nation's largest small-business advocacy group, representing 600,000 members in all 50 states. Its voice in Washington, D.C., is Dan Danner, an Ohio native and Purdue University graduate, who is the organization's lead lobbyist. During a recent visit to the NFIB's Indiana office, Danner sat down with IBJ to address issues critical to the state's smallbusiness owners. IBJ: As chief lobbyist for the NFIB, how do you get the organization's message to federal...
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STATEHOUSE DISPATCH: Lawmakers struggle amid chaos, but order will comeRestricted Content

March 21, 2005
Ed Feigenbaum
If you're having a tough time following the twists and turns of the political soap opera that is the 2005 Indiana General Assembly, you are not alone. Legislators find themselves so perpetually distracted by all sorts of peripheral issues and actions that Eli Lilly and Co. might want to consider a new market for its adult ADD medication. What do we mean by this legislative attention deficit disorder? Think back to December, when the first order of business seemed to...
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Lilly faction seeks split of exec roles: Shareholder group wants to separate chair, CEO jobsRestricted Content

March 21, 2005
Tom Murphy
The shareholders think Lilly should separate its chairman and CEO roles. Sidney Taurel currently holds both jobs and the title of president. The group wants an independent chairman. It's one of six shareholder proposals on the agenda for Lilly's April 18 annual meeting at its headquarters. The move would address "a leadership crisis at our company" created by the lack of access to affordable medicines, according to the proposal listed in Lilly's recently filed proxy statement. Lilly's board disagrees and...
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EYE ON THE PIE: Do we need agriculture department?Restricted Content

March 14, 2005
Morton Marcus
Indiana's General Assembly reflects Hoosier values. It wants to make us more like other states. If others have daylight-saving time, so should we. This is called progress. If others have a Department of Agriculture, so should we. This, too, is called progress. The idea that we should differentiate ourselves from others, that we should find new solutions to problems, is not examined. Let's look at House Bill 1008, which would create an Indiana Department of Agriculture. This proposal was given...
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Smoke carries economic toll: Ban backers cite health, productivity costsRestricted Content

March 14, 2005
Chris O\'malley
The annual cost of treating the secondhand-smoke-related illnesses of Marion County residents likely exceeds $16 million, a cost borne partly by businesses that provide their employees health insurance. Businesses also shoulder harder-to-calculate costs in the form of lost productivity and absenteeism, according to a 2002 study for the Marion County Health Department believed to be the best estimate yet of the local impact of cigarettes. But backers of the proposed City-County Council ordinance that would ban smoking in Indianapolis' bars...
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Convention, Colts issues in play: Hospitality: Hospitality officials say delays may scare off potential clientsRestricted Content

March 14, 2005
Andrea Muirragui
Hospitality officials say delays may scare off potential clients Patience is one thing. Imprudence is quite another. The Indiana Convention Center's largest customers are keeping a keen eye trained on Indianapolis these days, hoping for a sign that state lawmakers will find a way to fund a $275 million expansion that would give them room to grow. But the lack of progress more than halfway into the legislative session has some reevaluating their options. "I'm very disappointed at how this is...
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Unifying Indiana's IT efforts: State's new CTO plans to centralize computingRestricted Content

March 7, 2005
Peter Schnitzler
Indiana's state Web portal, access-Indiana, won at least a dozen awards over the last four years. It was frequently lauded as a model of modern government efficiency-robust, reliable and user-friendly. But, according to new Indiana Chief Technology Officer Karl Browning, the reality was only skin deep. Certainly, accessIndiana is the handsome public face of state information technology. But beneath the surface, there's a tangled mess of unconnected systems, each managed independently by a separate agency. Gov. Mitch Daniels, a Republican,...
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Library project set to resume: Firms play blame game over bungled workRestricted Content

March 7, 2005
Greg Andrews
Steel erection for the troubled Central Library expansion is finally expected to begin next month, library officials say. But they acknowledge the start of construction on the six-story addition won't signal they've finished fixing defects on the underground garage or resolved who's to blame for them. While officials say they're confident it's safe to build atop the garage that will serve as the foundation for the addition, they say it will continue to undergo repairs for another year or so....
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STATEHOUSE DISPATCH: At half-time in the Statehouse, it's politics 1, people 0Restricted Content

March 7, 2005
Ed Feigenbaum
This column is typically devoted to the intersection of politics, government and business (with an occasional tortured sports analogy tossed in). We don't usually address the higher order of the universe, but after last week, we find that we must delve into the field of metaphysics to provide you with some perspective on legislative events. March 1 marked the halfway point in the 2005 session of the Indiana General Assembly. But with more than 130 bills dying for lack of...
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GIZMOS: High-tech watch keeps information at your fingertipsRestricted Content

March 7, 2005
Michael Downey
The idea of a portable device to indicate the time of day is nothing new in the world of technology. Watches of various forms have been around for years. However, it's only been in the last 30 years or so that modern technology has changed the face-literally-of telling time. Since the days of the original Pulsar LED digital watches (think red calculator digits) in the early 1970s, watch manufacturers have tried to appeal to technology's early adopters by adding functionality...
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Differing views on smoking ban:Restricted Content

March 7, 2005
Jim May
With the smoking ban being considered by the City-County Council, we've begun to hear a lot of talk about rights: smokers' rights, non-smokers' rights, business owners' rights, etc. As proponents of the proposed ordinance attempt to garner increased support from the public, we constantly hear that non-smokers should have the right to breathe air free from the health risks contained in secondhand smoke. If that were truly the issue, this debate would long be over, as most smokers agree 100...
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CLOUD OF CONTROVERSY: Suburbs might follow city's lead Backers: Tough Indy ban would sway othersRestricted Content

February 28, 2005
Chris O\'malley
The City-County Council's handling of a proposed smoking ban has implications well beyond Indianapolis, to neighbors poised to adopt their own laws but watching the outcome in the state's most populous city. If Indianapolis doesn't enact a smoking ban, or adopts one that's politically unpalatable to neighboring cities and counties, those communities might adopt a confusing variety of laws, observers on both sides of the debate say. They say a lack of uniformity could even spawn a migration of bar...
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FAMILY BUSINESS: Consider having lawyer audit your business Small doses of advice from all of the professionals you consult with can prevent serious problems in the futureRestricted Content

February 28, 2005
Eric Manterfield
Many family business owners view their lawyer as a necessary evil. It's almost as though we carry some deadly disease; call your lawyer only when the life of your business depends on it! But just as physicians have learned to control smallpox with small doses of vac cine, administered over time, the owners of a family business can also use regular doses of lawyers and other advisers to minimize the risks of the many problems that can put your business...
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Ex-execs fly solo: Horn, Shoopman, others trade big firms for smallRestricted Content

February 21, 2005
Tammy Lieber
As president of The Dura Cos. Inc., Paul Shoopman was responsible for a 155-employee company that brought in $75 million in revenue in 2003 and built as many as 700 homes a year in Marion and the surrounding counties. Last year, Shoopman won an Ernst & Young national Entrepreneur of the Year award and sold his company to publicly traded California-based KB Home. This year, he's starting over. Shoopman, 51, opened Indiana Land Development Co. in early January. From his...
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Mann seeks larger digs as growth strategy pays off: Busy developer eyes property for new headquartersRestricted Content

February 21, 2005
Scott Olson
On Bash Street, off the beaten path from often-congested East 82nd Street, Mann Properties has quietly built a commercial real estate development business that is outgrowing its cozy quarters. The location in the developer's secondoldest office park has served Mann well since the mid-1980s. But flanked on both sides by other companies, the space offers virtually no chance to expand, let alone any opportunity for increased visibility. So Managing Partner Brian Mann, 37, has brokered a deal to purchase 20...
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Studies: Bans don't burn biz: Restrictions in other cities didn't reduce overall sales, but some taverns were hurtRestricted Content

February 21, 2005
Chris O\'malley
"My business was down 15 percent at first," recalled Gina Scott, co-owner of the Lexington pub. Lately, she added, "It's still down a bit. I don't know with the ban it will ever go up to where it was." This ban-in the heart of tobacco country-may offer a glimpse of what's to come for Indianapolis bars and restaurants if proponents of a smoking ban prevail in the City-County Council. The proposed Indianapolis ordinance is one of the most stringent in...
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  1. Of what value is selling alcoholic beverages to State Fair patrons when there are many families with children attending. Is this the message we want to give children attending and participating in the Fair, another venue with alooholic consumption onsite. Is this to promote beer and wine production in the state which are great for the breweries and wineries, but where does this end up 10-15 years from now, lots more drinkers for the alcoholic contents. If these drinks are so important, why not remove the alcohol content and the flavor and drink itself similar to soft drinks would be the novelty, not the alcoholic content and its affects on the drinker. There is no social or material benefit from drinking alcoholic beverages, mostly people want to get slightly or highly drunk.

  2. I did;nt know anyone in Indiana could count- WHY did they NOT SAY just HOW this would be enforced? Because it WON;T! NOW- with that said- BIG BROTHER is ALIVE in this Article-why take any comment if it won't appease YOU PEOPLE- that's NOT American- with EVERYTHING you indicated is NOT said-I can see WHY it say's o Comments- YOU are COMMIES- BIG BROTHER and most likely- voted for Obama!

  3. In Europe there are schools for hairdressing but you don't get a license afterwards but you are required to assist in turkey and Italy its 7 years in japan it's 10 years England 2 so these people who assist know how to do hair their not just anybody and if your an owner and you hire someone with no experience then ur an idiot I've known stylist from different countries with no license but they are professional clean and safe they have no license but they have experience a license doesn't mean anything look at all the bad hairdressers in the world that have fried peoples hair okay but they have a license doesn't make them a professional at their job I think they should get rid of it because stateboard robs stylist and owners and they fine you for the dumbest f***ing things oh ur license isn't displayed 100$ oh ur wearing open toe shoes fine, oh there's ONE HAIR IN UR BRUSH that's a fine it's like really? So I think they need to go or ease up on their regulations because their too strict

  4. Exciting times in Carmel.

  5. Twenty years ago when we moved to Indy I was a stay at home mom and knew not very many people.WIBC was my family and friends for the most part. It was informative, civil, and humerous with Dave the KING. Terri, Jeff, Stever, Big Joe, Matt, Pat and Crumie. I loved them all, and they seemed to love each other. I didn't mind Greg Garrison, but I was not a Rush fan. NOW I can't stand Chicks and all their giggly opinions. Tony Katz is to abrasive that early in the morning(or really any time). I will tune in on Saturday morning for the usual fun and priceless information from Pat and Crumie, mornings it will be 90.1

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