Forty Under 40

2014 Forty Under 40: Angela Adams

February 1, 2014
Lou Harry
Adams, 39, is associate general counsel for immigration at Indiana University, and a passionate advocate for the immigration cause.
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2014 Forty Under 40: Reynold 'Ren' Berry

February 1, 2014
Lou Harry
The partner at Rubin & Levin is building a deep career in the law.
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2014 Forty Under 40: Tavonna Harris Askew

February 1, 2014
Lou Harry
Askew, 37, is general counsel for Health and Hospital Corporation of Marion County and has a soft heart for youth.
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2014 Forty Under 40: Aman Brar

February 1, 2014
Lou Harry
Brar, 37, is president of Apparatus and a rising star in tech circles.
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2014 Forty Under 40: Ben Carlson

February 1, 2014
Lou Harry
Carlson, 39, is president and co-creator of Fizziology, and has the eye of Hollywood execs.
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2014 Forty Under 40: Tom Davidson

February 1, 2014
Lou Harry
Davidson, 30, owns Pastime Tournaments and makes dreams come true for wannabee baseball stars.
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2014 Forty Under 40: Brian Dixon

February 1, 2014
Lou Harry
Dixon, 35, is an assistant professor at Indiana University and on the cutting edge of health information technology.
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2014 Forty Under 40: Micah Frank

February 1, 2014
Lou Harry
Frank, 39, a partner in Black Market as well as its executive chef, has brought his global perspective on food to Indy.
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2014 Forty Under 40: Rebecca Geyer

February 1, 2014
Lou Harry
Geyer, 39, runs a namesake law firm and finds time outside the office for a host of contributions.
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2014 Forty Under 40: Michael Grady

February 1, 2014
Lou Harry
Grady, 30, is public address announcer for the Indiana Pacers and executive producer and show host of 1070 The Fan.
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2014 Forty Under 40: Emily Pelino

February 1, 2014
Lou Harry
Emily Pelino, now 32, took over the troubled KIPP Indianapolis charter school in 2009 after a disappointing four-year charter review (and after four previous leaders since 2004).
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2014 Forty Under 40: Monica Peck

February 1, 2014
Lou Harry
Monica Peck, 39, runs Hare Chevrolet with her sister Courtney. The two are sixth-generation owners of the auto dealership, which was founded in 1847 as a wagon and buggy manufacturer.
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2014 Forty Under 40: Scott Moorehead

February 1, 2014
Lou Harry
Six years ago, at age 30, Scott Moorehead took over cell phone service The Cellular Connection from his parents. By 2012, the company’s revenue grew from $191.2 million to $606.5 million.
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2014 Forty Under 40: Emily Masengale

February 1, 2014
Lou Harry
A Teach for America graduate, Emily Masengale was named St. Louis teacher of the year while working at an alternative school she helped launch. Now age 30, she runs a recovery school for high school dropouts, which she also helped launch.
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2014 Forty Under 40: Andrew Luck

February 1, 2014
Lou Harry
Unlike some other high-profile athletes, 24-year-old Indianapolis Colts quarterback Andrew Luck hasn't overload his first NFL years with endorsement deals.
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2014 Forty Under 40: Ayanna Jackson

February 1, 2014
Lou Harry
Ayanna Jackson, a 30-year-old associate scientist at Dow AgroSciences, solves analytical problems to help develop products for improving crop productivity.
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2014 Forty Under 40: Kelly Huntington

February 1, 2014
Lou Harry
Kelly Huntington, 38, worked in investment banking and private equity before getting her MBA and landing a job at AES Corp., parent of Indianapolis Power & Light Co. She became IPL's president in 2013.
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2014 Forty Under 40: Adam Hill

February 1, 2014
Lou Harry
Adam Hill, the 32-year-old CEO of LOR Corp., is pursuing new real estate development projects after selling the company's United Package Liquors chain.
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2014 Forty Under 40: Rob Hedges

February 1, 2014
Lou Harry
Rob Hedges, the 38-year-old fleet and facility department manager at Monarch Beverage, has helped his employer reduce its carbon footprint and improve efficiency.
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2014 Forty Under 40: Amanda Heckert

February 1, 2014
Lou Harry
Amanda Heckert, the 32-year-old editor-in-chief of Indianapolis Monthly magazine, says her challenge is to surprise and engage readers in an era when people have less and less free time.
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2014 Forty Under 40: Andrew Harrison

February 1, 2014
Lou Harry
Andrew Harrison, 34, serves as senior manager of corporate security at Ingram Micro, the acquirer of Brightpoint Inc. He said his employer handles millions of cool devices that people want to steal.
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2014 Forty Under 40: Anna Tyszkiewicz Gremling

February 1, 2014
Lou Harry
Anna Tyszkiewicz Gremling, the 34-year-old executive director of the Indianapolis Metropolitan Planning Organization, is glad she took a leap of faith and moved to Indianapolis from Michigan.
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2014 Forty Under 40: Christy Langley

February 1, 2014
Lou Harry
At age 31, Christy Langley might very well be the youngest person ever to head a city of Noblesville department. She and her staff just finished a year-long effort to update the city's master plan.
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2014 Forty Under 40: Sarah Urist Green

February 1, 2014
Lou Harry
Sarah Urist Green, 34, left a job with the Indianapolis Museum of Art to launch, with her husband—and fellow Forty Under 40 honoree John Green—the interactive PBS online program “The Art Assignment,” debuting Feb. 20.
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2014 Forty Under 40: John Green

February 1, 2014
Lou Harry
John Green, 36, is the best-selling author of "The Fault In Our Stars." He said he is immensively proud of the film version coming out in June.
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  1. Apologies for the wall of text. I promise I had this nicely formatted in paragraphs in Notepad before pasting here.

  2. I believe that is incorrect Sir, the people's tax-dollars are NOT paying for the companies investment. Without the tax-break the company would be paying an ADDITIONAL $11.1 million in taxes ON TOP of their $22.5 Million investment (Building + IT), for a total of $33.6M or a 50% tax rate. Also, the article does not specify what the total taxes were BEFORE the break. Usually such a corporate tax-break is a 'discount' not a 100% wavier of tax obligations. For sake of example lets say the original taxes added up to $30M over 10 years. $12.5M, New Building $10.0M, IT infrastructure $30.0M, Total Taxes (Example Number) == $52.5M ININ's Cost - $1.8M /10 years, Tax Break (Building) - $0.75M /10 years, Tax Break (IT Infrastructure) - $8.6M /2 years, Tax Breaks (against Hiring Commitment: 430 new jobs /2 years) == 11.5M Possible tax breaks. ININ TOTAL COST: $41M Even if you assume a 100% break, change the '30.0M' to '11.5M' and you can see the Company will be paying a minimum of $22.5, out-of-pocket for their capital-investment - NOT the tax-payers. Also note, much of this money is being spent locally in Indiana and it is creating 430 jobs in your city. I admit I'm a little unclear which tax-breaks are allocated to exactly which expenses. Clearly this is all oversimplified but I think we have both made our points! :) Sorry for the long post.

  3. Clearly, there is a lack of a basic understanding of economics. It is not up to the company to decide what to pay its workers. If companies were able to decide how much to pay their workers then why wouldn't they pay everyone minimum wage? Why choose to pay $10 or $14 when they could pay $7? The answer is that companies DO NOT decide how much to pay workers. It is the market that dictates what a worker is worth and how much they should get paid. If Lowe's chooses to pay a call center worker $7 an hour it will not be able to hire anyone for the job, because all those people will work for someone else paying the market rate of $10-$14 an hour. This forces Lowes to pay its workers that much. Not because it wants to pay them that much out of the goodness of their heart, but because it has to pay them that much in order to stay competitive and attract good workers.

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  5. It is sad to see these races not have a full attendance. The Indy Car races are so much more exciting than Nascar. It seems to me the commenters here are still a little upset with Tony George from a move he made 20 years ago. It was his decision to make, not yours. He lost his position over it. But I believe the problem in all pro sports is the escalating price of admission. In todays economy, people have to pay much more for food and gas. The average fan cannot attend many events anymore. It's gotten priced out of most peoples budgets.

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