Forty Under 40

2011 Forty Under 40: Mamon Powers III

February 5, 2011
Marc and Martha Allan / Special to IBJ
Construction is in the blood of Mamon Powers III. In 1967, the eldest Mamon Powers, whose father had worked in construction, founded Powers & Sons Construction Co. Mamon Powers Jr., now the company’s CEO, joined four years later. And at 31, Mamon Powers III serves as vice president in charge of the Indianapolis office.
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2011 Forty Under 40: Jeff Ready

February 5, 2011
Marc and Martha Allan / Special to IBJ
In 1995, Jeff Ready started his first technology company as a senior at Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology in Terre Haute. The 36-year-old has never stopped since then.
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2011 Forty Under 40: Clayton Robinson

February 5, 2011
Marc and Martha Allan / Special to IBJ
Clay Robinson started his brewing career about 12 years ago at Rock Bottom, where his boss described the job as “wet, hot, sticky and dirty.” Now 35, he's an owner of Sun King Brewing Co.
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2011 Forty Under 40: Dr. Richard "Ben" Rodgers

February 5, 2011
Marc and Martha Allan / Special to IBJ
In 2010, Dr. Richard “Ben” Rodgers became certified by the American Board of Neurological Surgery. That makes it sound like Rodgers is new to his field, but the 38-year-old actually already has racked up a host of accomplishments.
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2011 Forty Under 40: Rafael Sanchez

February 5, 2011
Marc and Martha Allan / Special to IBJ
In addition to being a partner at Bingham McHale LLP, attorney Rafael Sanchez’s resume includes a host of community activities. Oh, and the 36-year-old also coaches youth soccer for his children.
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2011 Forty Under 40: Krista Skidmore

February 5, 2011
Marc and Martha Allan / Special to IBJ
As co-owner of the human resources consulting company Flashpoint, 35-year-old Krista Skidmore shares her expertise with businesses throughout the Midwest.
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2011 Forty Under 40: Sara Snow

February 5, 2011
Marc and Martha Allan / Special to IBJ
Sara Snow was living “green” before green was cool. Now 34, she grew up in Ann Arbor, Mich., in a house heated with a wood stove and solar heat.
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2011 Forty Under 40: Jeremy Stephenson

February 5, 2011
Marc and Martha Allan / Special to IBJ
On Feb. 4, 34-year-old Jeremy Stephenson saw 4-1/2 years of work conclude successfully when the JW Marriott complex—1,005 guest rooms in 34 stories and 104,000 square feet of meeting, banquet and exhibit space—opened downtown.
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2011 Forty Under 40: Jenny Vance

February 5, 2011
Marc and Martha Allan / Special to IBJ
Jenny Vance started LeadJen in 2004 to provide sales leads and prospecting support to business-to-business sales and marketing executives. Now the 32-year-old is at the helm of what has become a multimillion-dollar lead-generation services company.
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2011 Forty Under 40: Nichole Wilson

February 5, 2011
Marc and Martha Allan / Special to IBJ
You won’t find Nichole Wilson in her office near Community Hospital North—the 33-year-old is rarely there.
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2011 Forty Under 40: Trevor Yager

February 5, 2011
Marc and Martha Allan / Special to IBJ
Trevor Yager started TrendyMinds as a senior at Anderson University. Now 36, he has been growing it into a full-scale marketing services business ever since.
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2011 Forty Under 40: Brian Zurawski

February 5, 2011
Marc and Martha Allan / Special to IBJ
In his 12-plus years at Summit Realty, Brian Zurawski has moved up to partner and chief operating officer, and in the past five years the 39-year-old has been involved in nearly 200 transactions involving 23 million square feet of industrial and office space.
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  1. I am not by any means judging whether this is a good or bad project. It's pretty simple, the developers are not showing a hardship or need for this economic incentive. It is a vacant field, the easiest for development, and the developer already has the money to invest $26 million for construction. If they can afford that, they can afford to pay property taxes just like the rest of the residents do. As well, an average of $15/hour is an absolute joke in terms of economic development. Get in high paying jobs and maybe there's a different story. But that's the problem with this ask, it is speculative and users are just not known.

  2. Shouldn't this be a museum

  3. I don't have a problem with higher taxes, since it is obvious that our city is not adequately funded. And Ballard doesn't want to admit it, but he has increased taxes indirectly by 1) selling assets and spending the money, 2) letting now private entities increase user fees which were previously capped, 3) by spending reserves, and 4) by heavy dependence on TIFs. At the end, these are all indirect tax increases since someone will eventually have to pay for them. It's mathematics. You put property tax caps ("tax cut"), but you don't cut expenditures (justifiably so), so you increase taxes indirectly.

  4. Marijuana is the safest natural drug grown. Addiction is never physical. Marijuana health benefits are far more reaching then synthesized drugs. Abbott, Lilly, and the thousands of others create poisons and label them as medication. There is no current manufactured drug on the market that does not pose immediate and long term threat to the human anatomy. Certainly the potency of marijuana has increased by hybrids and growing techniques. However, Alcohol has been proven to destroy more families, relationships, cause more deaths and injuries in addition to the damage done to the body. Many confrontations such as domestic violence and other crimes can be attributed to alcohol. The criminal activities and injustices that surround marijuana exists because it is illegal in much of the world. If legalized throughout the world you would see a dramatic decrease in such activities and a savings to many countries for legal prosecutions, incarceration etc in regards to marijuana. It indeed can create wealth for the government by collecting taxes, creating jobs, etc.... I personally do not partake. I do hope it is legalized throughout the world.

  5. Build the resevoir. If built this will provide jobs and a reason to visit Anderson. The city needs to do something to differentiate itself from other cities in the area. Kudos to people with vision that are backing this project.

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