Government

ECONOMIC ANALYSIS: Why subprime 'crisis' is not as severe as it seemsRestricted Content

January 28, 2008
Mike Hicks
Over the next few years, quite a few doctoral dissertations are going to be written about the subprime loan market, and its effects on the overall U.S. economy. And whatever the effects turn out to be, it is certain that this financial mess has all the twists and turns of a spy novel. Here is part of the plot: Over the past decade and half, home prices skyrocketed. The causes included rapid growth in the U.S. economy, aging baby-boomer purchases...
More

EDITORIAL: State negligent on smoking ban: Lawmakers sidestep serious issueRestricted Content

January 28, 2008
State negligent on smoking ban Lawmakers sidestep serious issue We'd like to think the demise of Rep. Charlie Brown's bill that would have banned workplace smoking statewide was just another casualty of the property tax reform wave. More likely, the bill died because our legislators don't have the will to tackle the sad state of Hoosier health. Brown's bill died in a House committee Jan. 23 after a brief hearing in which testimony on the bill's behalf was cut off...
More

Public offerings rise in '07: Three Indiana companies hit turbulence after IPOsRestricted Content

January 28, 2008
Scott Olson
The market for initial public offerings in Indiana was on the upswing last year, as the number of companies to go public tripled, from one in 2006 to three in 2007. Locally based HHGregg Inc., Kokomobased Haynes International Inc. and LaPorte-based LaPorte Bancorp. Inc. became publicly traded. The fact that three more companies in Indiana became public doesn't represent a trend. But four others that have filed IPO registration statements with the Securities and Exchange Commission bolster the belief that...
More

Lawmaker wants car owners to be aware of data recordersRestricted Content

January 28, 2008
Chris O'Malley
The "event data recorder," a so-called black box car makers have installed in their cars over the last decade and a half as part of air-bag systems, can be a double-edged sword for motorists. Yet they likely don't even know it's spying from under their seat or dashboard.
More

EYE ON THE PIE: Hoosier excess contrary to our natureRestricted Content

January 21, 2008
Morton Marcus
People think of Indiana as a place of moderation. We're not known for extremes. We are followers, not leaders. Certainly, we are not risk-takers. How then can we explain some inexplicable behaviors? Indiana's secretary of state and others were in Washington, D.C., before the U.S. Supreme Court recently to defend the nation's most extreme voter ID law. No one was prepared to say we suffered from an avalanche of voter fraud. There was not even evidence of a snowflake of...
More

City emerging as drug distribution hub: Medco Health Solutions deal latest boon to growing subsector in Indiana's life sciences development effortsRestricted Content

January 21, 2008
Peter Schnitzler
Thanks to a series of major economic development wins, Indianapolis is enjoying a pharmaceutical distribution business hot streak. Life sciences industry leaders hope to keep the sizzle burning in 2008 and beyond. "It's not something we're hoping we can do someday. It's something we're already doing now," said BioCrossroads CEO David Johnson. "We're simply trying to expand the footprint of what we're doing." Pharmaceutical logistics has become a big business. According to the Arlington, Va.-based Healthcare Distribution Management Association, U.S....
More

The Corydon Group LLC: Reputations help lobbyists build business Shared passion for government led golf buddies to partnershipRestricted Content

January 21, 2008
Jo Ellen
When Chris Gibson and Mike Leppert headed for the golf course in the late 1990s, it was strictly business. Walking from tee to tee, the men talked about lobbying, the law and regulatory agencies. After 18 months of playing 18 holes, they decided to form The Corydon Group, a government relations firm founded in 2000 in Indianapolis. The firm monitors bills and amendments proposed in the Indiana General Assembly, prepares reports on key legislation, attends meetings and hearings, and lobbies...
More

VIEWPOINT: Improving health: more than a January fadRestricted Content

January 21, 2008
Julia Tanney
As I waited in line at the cafeteria just into the new year, I watched the man in front of me. It would be easy to assume the salad and wrap station would provide patrons with a healthful lunch option. Yet I saw a generous portion of fried chicken in a spinach tortilla topped with a pile of cheese and several servings of salad dressing. The man might have started with good intentions, but in a matter of seconds a...
More

STATEHOUSE DISPATCH: Daniels pushes tax fix, avoids cluttering agendaRestricted Content

January 21, 2008
Ed Feigenbaum
The governor's State of the State address on Jan. 15 served up no surprises. His priority, a conceptual consensus shared by virtually all lawmakers, continues to be long-lasting property tax reform framed in the context of an overall tax cut for owner-occupied residential property. Beyond that major task, Gov. Mitch Daniels offered nothing in the way of innovative programs for this year. That, of course, is not because he lacks vision or boldness, qualities for which he has been both...
More

RETURN ON TECHNOLOGY: Exploding mobile phone? Maybe you bought a fakeRestricted Content

January 21, 2008
Tim Altom
Has your cell phone exploded lately? A cell phone battery literally blows up, shattering the phone and spraying hot components like shrapnel. Detonating phones haven't killed anyone that I could determine, but they've caused several trips to the hospital for lacerations, burns and broken eardrums. When it happens, manufacturers understandably scramble to find out why, and the answer today is often that the battery was actually a knockoff, a counterfeit that looks just like the real thing, but might be...
More

NOTIONS: Will the change bandwagon ever roll our way?Restricted Content

January 14, 2008
Bruce Hetrick
On the presidential campaign trail these past few weeks, the dominant exit-polling insight seems to be that Americans are hungry for change. Voters have told interviewers they're weary of the direction we're headed, tired of the politics of the past and eager to forego the status quo. And so the presidential candidates, Republican and Democrat alike, have jumped on the change bandwagon, ridden it from Iowa to New Hampshire, and tried to explain why they've been, are, or could be...
More

EYE ON THE PIE: Indiana being stamped with wrong imageRestricted Content

January 14, 2008
Morton Marcus
Blessed be our friends at the U.S. Postal Service. They do a great job of collecting and distributing the mail. They face strong competition from private carriers and from the Internet, but they continue to serve the public well. Then, too, USPS always looks for new ways to honor America and Americans through the issuance of new stamps. If a particular series catches on, they can make a pretty penny by selling stamps that are never used. That's why USPS...
More

Community education keeping up with business: Lawrence Township, other districts making classes more convenientRestricted Content

January 14, 2008
Scott Olson
Thirteen years ago, long before the current commotion over escalating property taxes in Marion County, a local public school superintendent became embroiled in a similar uproar. Residents of Lawrence Township in 1994 challenged former district leader Bernard McKenzie to rein in what they perceived as excessive spending of taxpayer funds. He responded by creating the Lawrence Township Community Education Program as a testament to the citizens and their support. Today, it has grown to serve about 6,000 people annually and...
More

STATEHOUSE DISPATCH: Property-tax abolition isn't off table after allRestricted Content

January 14, 2008
Ed Feigenbaum
Lawmakers had their individual and collective eyes opened last summer by scores of organized and impromptu property tax rallies across Indiana. While many who carried a sign, marched in the streets, or wrote a letter to the editor about the situation simply thought their individual taxes were too high, a good number of them (and several of the organizers of such events) had a special goal: the elimination of property taxes. Even after the municipal elections woke up the few...
More

Property-tax plan shifts tab for poor relief from counties to stateRestricted Content

January 14, 2008
Peter Schnitzler
Here's a political hot potato that so far has received little discussion in the rancorous debate over property-tax reform: Should the enormous costs of helping impoverished Hoosiers continue to be funded county by county, or spread to taxpayers statewide?
More

Commentary: 2007 columns sparked debateRestricted Content

January 14, 2008
Mickey Maurer
Each January, I like to reflect on a few of the prior year's topics. I am always curious about the people I have written about over the course of the year. I hope you are, too. In the May 21 issue, I wrote about the plight of Amy Sorrell. Sorrell was an English and journalism teacher at Woodlan Junior-Senior High School in Allen County near Fort Wayne who also advised the school newspaper, The Tomahawk. The Jan. 19, 2007, issue...
More

INVESTING: Bond insurers pummeled for straying into risky areaRestricted Content

January 14, 2008
Ken Skarbeck
As Wall Street continues to record multibillion-dollar losses for its debt-market indiscretions, another industry that for years earned steady returns from the credit markets is sitting on the doorstep of implosion. For decades, bond insurers operated the relatively mundane business of insuring, and thereby guaranteeing, the timely payment of principal and interest on municipal bonds issued by various government and other entities. In recent years, the bond insurers strayed from their core business model and underwrote insurance on the new...
More

EYE ON THE PIE: Change economy to raise incomesRestricted Content

January 7, 2008
Morton Marcus
My holiday gift was the latest quarterly data from the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis. Santa put them in my e-mail box and I played with them when not attending to ritual family matters. Yes, personalincome numbers for all the states right up to the third quarter of 2007. Oh, joy; oh, ecstasy-feeding my lascivious quantitative desires. And what did I find? Over the past year, the third quarter of 2006 to the same quarter of 2007, Indiana has ranked...
More

STATEHOUSE DISPATCH: Agendas vary widely as tax-reform efforts heat upRestricted Content

January 7, 2008
Ed Feigenbaum
How did it all seem so simple back in September? The reality of reform is sinking in for lawmakers and interest groups. Hoosiers who demanded serious property tax reform in November-and expected their wishes to be fulfilled-now see indications that the road to reform may be bumpier than foreseen. The property tax reform plan detailed in late October by Gov. Mitch Daniels was initially largely well-received by voters and lawmakers, but after it rattled around for a while and the...
More

Commentary: Good luck to Mayor BallardRestricted Content

January 7, 2008
Chris Katterjohn
Mayor Greg Ballard has less than a week under his belt of taking on a city that is both on a roll and full of challenges. It's an exciting time to be mayor. An unknown commodity, Ballard has some big shoes to fill with little experience in government to help him out. (Note to self: That's not necessarily a bad thing.) Indianapolis has been blessed with strong leadership for the last 40 years, beginning in 1968 with Republican Richard Lugar,...
More

RETURN ON TECHNOLOGY: Beware: e-mail is bastion of many security lapsesRestricted Content

January 7, 2008
Tim Altom
Tell the truth-you've "Googled" yourself, haven't you? All of us have, or at least we should. It's interesting for me to do it for myself, because I've been an Internet denizen since before the Web was woven, when all most of us did was exchange e-mails. What chills me sometimes is how far back the Google results for my name can go, clear into the mid-1990s in some cases. The 'Net never forgets anything. If you have doubts about that,...
More

For city politics, back to the future: GOP returns without guaranteesRestricted Content

December 31, 2007
The Republican party dominated city government here in the 1970s, '80s and '90s, and for much of that time it was assumed that the party's lock on city hall was tamper-proof. Voters proved that theory wrong in 1999. Whether it was changing demographics or the fatigue that sets in when one party rules for too long, the public turned the mayor's office over to Democrat Bart Peterson. Four years later, Peterson easily won re-election and the Democrats won the City-County...
More

SPORTS: An open letter to Greg, er Hizzoner, Mayor Ballard:Restricted Content

December 31, 2007
Bill Benner
Well, the day is here when you finally get the keys to the offices on the 25th floor of the City-County Building. Congratulations. I knew you had the election in the bag all the way. Yeah, right. Anyway, I've noticed you have formed a number of transition teams to bring you up to speed on the various forms and functions of citycounty government. Folks way smarter than I have provided reams of information that will provide you a road map...
More

Of battles won and trouble ahead: Peterson says state action key to city's futureRestricted Content

December 31, 2007
Peter Schnitzler
Democrat Bart Peterson leaves office in early January after two terms as mayor of Indianapolis. Succeeding him will be Republican Greg Ballard, a former lieutenant colonel in the U.S. Marine Corps who parlayed property-tax outrage into a surprise win. As Peterson, 49, prepared to leave office, he sat down with IBJ. The following is an edited version of the interview. IBJ: You didn't expect to be stepping down this year. What was the most significant priority you had planned for...
More

THE TRAVELING LIFE: Genghis Khan slept-and was admired-here

December 31, 2007
Frank Basile
Before we landed at the Genghis Khan Airport, checked into the Genghis Khan Hotel, and drank Genghis Khan beer, everything we had heard about the most famous Mongol of all time was negative. But that changed when we visited Mongolia in September. You might wonder what nice things could be said about a guy who conquered more territory in 25 years than the Romans did in 400? Well, the people we encountered perceived him as a combination of George Washington,...
More
Sponsored by
ADVERTISEMENT

facebook - twitter on Facebook & Twitter

Follow on TwitterFollow IBJ on Facebook:
Follow on TwitterFollow IBJ's Tweets on these topics:
 
Subscribe to IBJ
ADVERTISEMENT