Government

EYE ON THE PIE: Save our cities and towns from neglectRestricted Content

October 22, 2007
Morton Marcus
Whose face is on the dime? It's Franklin Delano Roosevelt. That's no arbitrary choice. FDR had polio as an adult. He fought back and became governor of New York and then the only four-term president of the United States. For two decades, from 1938 forward, The National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis campaigned to fight polio epidemics. Each January, children and adults contributed to the national "March of Dimes" to raise funds for research and treatment. FDR was the symbol of...
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Firm sees growth for on-site clinics: Novia thinks workplace care can cut costs, help employeesRestricted Content

October 15, 2007
Scott Olson
Doctors who make house calls are about as obsolete as polio. But a fledgling local company is taking a page from the past and reintroducing the practice to the workplace instead of the home. Rising medical costs and the companies desperate to contain them are driving interest in the emerging model of on-site clinics. Large employers such as Toyota Motor Co., Pepsi Bottling Group, Credit Suisse and Sprint Nextel have embraced health clinics in recent years, in hopes of promoting...
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Experts look into the future of health care: Industry panelists disagree on whether current system needs radical changesRestricted Content

October 15, 2007
Five local industry leaders conducted a serious debate over problems and issues facing our health care system during the most recent installment in Indianapolis Business Journal's Power Breakfast series. The event took place at the Downtown Marriott hotel on Sept. 21 The panelists: Robert Brody, president and CEO of St. Francis Hospital & Health Centers, the Indianapolis-area's fourth-largest hospital system. Brody has been chief executive at St. Francis since 1996. Dr. Robert Mouser, a primary care physician at Cornerstone Family...
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PEOs bouncing back following shakeout: Professional employer organizations enjoying growth as companies seek better ways to manage benefitsRestricted Content

October 8, 2007
Scott Olson
Even though Sentelligence Inc. in Noblesville has only five employees, the tiny tech firm offers an appealing benefits package rivaling that of a large corporation. The designer of diagnostic sensing devices for diesel engines has not discovered the Holy Grail of human resources. Rather, it's using what's known as a professional employer organization. Companies contract with PEOs to handle all the headaches of human resources, including payroll, payroll taxes, Worker's Compensation claims, health plans, and other employee benefits, not to...
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Loss of institute may polarize Statehouse debate: Board considers shuttering respected government research organizationRestricted Content

October 8, 2007
Peter Schnitzler
If the Indiana Fiscal Policy Institute remains shuttered due to a lack of funds, the public won't notice immediately. After all, the Indianapolis-based organization focused on long-term analysis of complicated communal questions, such as how to equalize property taxes, diversify state pensions or finance public schools. But taxpayers eventually will feel the impact. For 20 years, the institute has played a key role in Statehouse debate, helping frame major issues with hard facts and figures that conservatives and liberals alike...
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THERE OUGHT TO BE A LAW: Hey dude, the boss is parking in my space!Restricted Content

October 8, 2007
Ron Gifford
I'll admit it: Until recently, I thought "My Space" was simply where I stored "my stuff." My bad, it turns out. Just ask that young staffer down the hall: The new place to see and be seen is MySpace, Facebook or one of the other online social communities. This summer, MySpace announced it had more than 70 million unique users in the United States-meaning nearly one in four Americans used the site, for a total of nearly 50 billion page...
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ECONOMIC ANALYSIS: Long road ahead for financing transportationRestricted Content

October 1, 2007
Mike Hicks
The recent Indiana Logistics Summit framed a number of issues that matter to Hoosiers young and old. I've done a fair amount of transportation and economic development research, but this conference held in Indianapolis was a chance for me to listen and learn. Here's my take on some of the issues: Nationally, a significant piece of the public transportation infrastructure (roads and bridges, for example) has already outlived its anticipated life span. Solid engineering and construction coupled with continual maintenance...
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Capital key topic at forum: Fourth life sciences event grows with local industryRestricted Content

October 1, 2007
Scott Olson
The pulse of Indiana's fledgling life sciences sector will be taken later this month at an annual conference featuring some of the industry's strongest advocates. Experts will weigh in on several topics ranging from the discovery of technology to accessing capital, which is a growing concern for the earliest-stage companies that are riskier investments. In its fourth year, the Indiana Life Sciences Forum will take place Oct. 22-23 at the Westin Indianapolis and will be hosted by Indiana business-development initiative...
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Commentary: Here's the skinny on why we're fatRestricted Content

October 1, 2007
Tom Harton
A week rarely passes without news of our obesity epidemic. Fattest-state rankings and the like are a staple of our news diet. These stories are often served with dire health warnings, which politicians invoke when they encourage us to eat less and exercise more. But does anyone really stop to think about why obesity has become our national obsession? Our infamous rotundness isn't only a byproduct of poor eating habits and a reluctance to hit the gym. Chalk some of...
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Navigating the credit crunch: Will subprime woes leave you dry? Here's what to look for.Restricted Content

September 24, 2007
Scott Olson
For months, we've been reading and hearing news about the so-called subprime mortgage crisis and the resulting "credit crunch." For thousands of families who have lost their homes to foreclosure, the crisis is clear. For most people, however, the impact isn't so obvious. Beyond those directly affected by mortgage defaults, who else should be concerned about the aftershocks? Some economic forecasters are warning that the subprime mortgage situation and the ongoing weakness in the housing market could linger long enough...
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VIEWPOINT: Avoiding Chinese 'fifth-shipment' folliesRestricted Content

September 24, 2007
Benjamin A.
The recent announcement by the Indianapolis company Gilchrist and Soames that it would recall its privately branded toothpaste because of concerns regarding its diethylene glycol content is a small part of a larger global concern about the quality standards of goods made in China. The same week, Mattel recalled more than 9.5 million U.S. toys over concerns about the use of lead paint. Many Indiana firms rely on a steady stream of qualified products from China, so now seems a...
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Commentary: Get the smoke out of our eyesRestricted Content

September 24, 2007
Mickey Maurer
Andy Jacobs Jr. wrote in an IBJ column that smoking is an expensive and painful way to commit suicide. He's right. But he didn't go far enough. Breathing secondhand smoke at one's place of employment is also an expensive and painful way to go. The world is beginning to read the smoke signals. Many countries have passed laws to protect their work force from secondhand smoke. Today, you cannot smoke even in an Irish pub. In our country, 22 states...
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EYE ON THE PIE: Give tax relief to those who truly need itRestricted Content

September 24, 2007
Morton Marcus
No topic brings me more mail than property taxes. Some of this mail is silly, some is tragic. Many writers are concerned that they or their neighbors will lose their homes because of propertytax increases. This is a serious, legitimate concern. However, it is not a reason to abolish property taxes. Those who are hard-pressed to pay their property taxes are not different from those who have problems paying utility bills, medical bills, and the costs of other necessities. These...
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VIEWPOINT: Why shouldn't churches pay taxes?Restricted Content

September 17, 2007
Jason Smith
Though it probably should not have been, a recent headline in The Indianapolis Star-$2.7 billion in property untaxed in Marion County-was a bit of a stunner. And more so was an adjoining article revealing nearly half of that property to be owned by churches and religious institutions. In the article, the Rev. Kent Millard, senior pastor at St. Luke's United Methodist Church, invoked the separation of church and state as justification for St. Luke's quarter-million-dollar annual tax dodge. And I'm...
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Township wrestles with incorporation: As Greenwood, Bargersville annex commercial corridors, rest of township declinesRestricted Content

September 17, 2007
Anthony Schoettle
White River Township in northwest Johnson County is dotted with an increasing number of high-priced homes and anchored by one of the area's strongest school districts. But the area, known as Center Grove, also is marked by crumbling roads, poor drainage and an anemic parks system. To preserve its strengths and shore up its growing weaknesses, some in the area think White River Township needs to incorporate into its own city. The township of more than 40,000 residents faces the...
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EYE ON THE PIE: Time to make government accountableRestricted Content

September 17, 2007
Morton Marcus
The biggest change the Kernan-Shepard commission could recommend for improving local government would be to focus responsibility. Some folks want to consolidate government horizontally; that means combining units of the same type. It might take the form of consolidating school corporations or bringing the number of library districts down from 238 to some smaller number. (It could mean reducing the number of counties from 92 to a more realistic number, but I should not try to make you laugh.) Many...
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BRIAN WILLIAMS: Indiana needs to get energy-wiseRestricted Content

September 10, 2007
As the 14th-mostpopulous state in the union, Indiana generates a gross state product that is 16th-largest of the 50 states. Unfortunately, despite significant investments in equipment and processes by manufacturers and public-policy efforts to encourage the attraction and growth of knowledgeand technology-focused industries, our economy remains energy-inefficient. In 2003, Indiana was the country's sixthlargest consumer of energy per capita, according to the Indiana Energy Report. Ninety-seven percent of Indiana's electricity is generated by coal. Indiana is the fifthlargest emitter of...
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ECONOMIC ANALYSIS Mike Hicks: It's time for a little perspective on home foreclosuresRestricted Content

September 10, 2007
A big financial crisis spreads the notion that the interests of Wall Street differ from the interests of Main Street. The "liquidity crisis" of the past few weeks, with its difficult jargon and complex financial instruments, is a prime example. Unfortunately, the notion that the tumult represents a failure of markets is exactly the wrong lesson to take away from this experience. In a nutshell, here's why. In the past few years, mortgage lenders-ranging from the George Baileytype savings and...
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Increasing demand for land surveyors sparks changes: Despite some criticism, Purdue University moves program into different department to attract more studentsRestricted Content

September 3, 2007
Scott Olson
Purdue University is mapping out a controversial strategy to produce more land surveyors amid growing demand for graduates entering the profession. The number of Purdue students interested in pursuing a surveying career has dwindled to just a dozen out of roughly 500 enrolled in the university's School of Civil Engineering. M. Katherine Banks, head of the school, attributes the dearth to a lack of visibility the surveying program endures tucked within the larger department. "We need a fresh start," she...
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EYE ON THE PIE: Should we consolidate libraries?Restricted Content

September 3, 2007
Morton Marcus
At last, we have a commission working to see if we can improve government in Indiana through reorganization. Former Gov. Joe Kernan and Supreme Court Justice Randy Shepard are leading the effort. Some of us are concerned that the commission has been established to find ways not to improve government services, but to cut local property taxes. The two goals might not work in the same direction. Public libraries are often cited as ripe for consolidation. There are 238 of...
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Commentary: Is this any way to run a government?Restricted Content

September 3, 2007
Abdul-Hakim Shabazz
As someone who writes and pontificates about the events of the day, summer is usually my slow season. I have to work hard to find things to write and talk about for public consumption. However, this summer has been a whole different matter. We have all been taken aback by the tax protests and subsequent government actions to mitigate the damage. But that wasn't the big story that caught my attention. The story that stuck in my craw was the...
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VOICES FROM THE INDUSTRY: Indiana needs to develop more technology workersRestricted Content

August 27, 2007
James L.
Far from its older perception of a backoffice function, information technology today is cutting edge and business savvy, driving innovation in virtually every industrial sector. As an industry, IT in Indiana has seen significant growth in the past few years. In fact, the state's tech nology sector has grown so quickly that the industry faces a new challenge-employers are experiencing explosive growth and cannot find enough qualified individuals to fill these new positions. As documented by the Indiana Department of...
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EYE ON THE PIE: Should fees replace property taxes?Restricted Content

August 27, 2007
Morton Marcus
So you want to be a boxer in Indiana? There's a $10 fee to be paid every other year for the privilege. That's a lot lower than the twoyear fee of $100 paid by architects. A driver's license is good for five years and costs just $19.50. Whereas your aircraft bears a $10 annual registration fee, your passenger car has a $20.75 annual state fee. If you want to support a special cause, the Bureau of Motor Vehicles charges a...
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ECONOMIC ANALYSIS: How Indiana's industrial economy looks to a newcomerRestricted Content

August 27, 2007
Mike Hicks
This week marks the start of my tenure as director of Ball State University's Bureau of Business Research. I take over from Pat Barkey, whose thoughts on the state's economy have long graced this column. His will be hard shoes to fill. I have read over many of Pat's old columns, and the one thing that stands out is how much we agree on the issues facing the state-and their solutions. Contrary to the old stereotypes, hard-headed economists usually come...
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Small biz tax bills rising, too: Extra expense narrows marginsRestricted Content

August 27, 2007
Jennifer Whitson
Area homeowners weren't the only ones to get a shock when they opened their 2007 tax bills. Some small-business owners also saw their bills skyrocket-putting a strain on entrepreneurs who often operate on razor-thin margins. "It's catastrophic for some businesses," said Kevin Hughes, state director for the National Federation of Independent Business's Indiana chapter. Mike Hutson, owner of Westfield Lighting Co., certainly feels the pain. The bill on his commercial property-several acres and a 22,500-square-foot building-increased from $42,000 in 2006...
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  1. I had read earlier this spring that Noodles & Co was going to open in the Fishers Marketplace (which is SR 37 and 131st St, not 141st St, just FYI). Any word on that? Also, do you happen to know what is being built in Carmel at Pennsylvania and Old Meridian? May just be an office building but I'm not sure.

  2. I'm sorry, but you are flat out wrong. There are few tracks in the world with the history of IMS and probably NO OTHER as widely known and recognized. I don't care what you think about the stat of Indy Car racing, these are pretty hard things to dispute.

  3. Also wondering if there is an update on the Brockway Pub-Danny Boy restaurant/taproom that was planned for the village as well?

  4. Why does the majority get to trample on the rights of the minority? You do realize that banning gay marriage does not rid the world of gay people, right? They are still going to be around and they are still going to continue to exist. The best way to get it all out of the spotlight? LEGALIZE IT! If gay marriage is legal, they will get to stop trying to push for it and you will get to stop seeing it all over the news. Why do Christians get to decide what is moral?? Why do you get to push your religion on others? How would legalizing gay marriage expose their lifestyle to your children? By the way, their lifestyle is going to continue whether gay marriage is legalized or not. It's been legal in Canada for quite a while now and they seem to be doing just fine. What about actual rules handed down by God? What about not working on Sundays? What about obeying your parents? What about adultery? These are in the 10 Commandments, the most important of God's rules. Yet they are all perfectly legal. What about divorce? Only God is allowed to dissolve a marriage so why don't you work hard to get divorce banned? Why do you get to pick and choose the parts of the Bible you care about?

  5. Look at the bright side. With the new Lowe's call center, that means 1000 jobs at $10 bucks an hour. IMS has to be drooling over all that disposable income. If those employees can save all their extra money after bills, in five years they can go to the race LIVE. Can you say attendance boost?

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