Government

ECONOMIC ANALYSIS: Politics sometimes fuels destructive public policyRestricted Content

August 14, 2006
Patrick Barkey
If you called someone a royalist these days, you'd probably just get a blank stare. But 200 years ago, you would have started a heated discussion and perhaps even a deadly duel. The accusation was often leveled toward those who managed the economy in those days, perhaps for good reason. Then, as now, bankers, financiers and the other moguls trusted with responsibility for national money matters were not always a democratic lot. While politically incorrect then as well as now,...
More

VOICES FROM THE INDUSTRY: Low-impact development likely to make a big impactRestricted Content

August 14, 2006
Brian Mann
Every time Indiana experiences one of its summer cloudbursts, the rainfall sets into motion one of a real estate development's most expensive and least appreciated systems. As rain hits the ground, it quickly collects into wellengineered courses to swales and gutters, through pipes and culverts and into detention ponds. Flowing around, over and through the land that once absorbed it, the water is efficiently collected and conveyed off the site. In other words, gather it up and drain it off....
More

NOTIONS: A taste of political cynicism served at minimum wageRestricted Content

August 7, 2006
Bruce Hetrick
I eat out a lot. Heck, I eat out more than I eat in. So I'm something of a restaurant whiz. From locals to chains, fast food to fancy fare, I can tell you who serves what, how well and for how much. But until my friend Cheri read a book called "Nickel and Dimed," in which author Barbara Ehrenreich recounts a first-person social experiment working low-wage jobs, I never asked a waiter or waitress about the going rate for...
More

Create-a-job program serving disabled threatened: Federal funding cuts could mean early end for options available through customized employment initiativeRestricted Content

August 7, 2006
Andrea Muirragui
Bryan Ballard and Cody Feldman never dreamed they'd end up here, soaking up the sun along Indianapolis' downtown canal, peddling frozen treats from their very own ice cream cart. They certainly never planned to become business partners when they met as adolescents playing Special Olympics basketball. But it happened anyway, thanks to a federally funded program intended to help significantly disabled individuals find work that fits their interests and skills. What makes the so-called customizedemployment effort unusual is its emphasis...
More

EYE ON THE PIE: Your eye-dentity is the key to our futureRestricted Content

August 7, 2006
Morton Marcus
By my calculations, the U.S. population will reach 300 million on or about Oct. 15. There is no need to specify the hour and minute. The population clock at the U.S. Bureau of the Census indicates that we are adding to our numbers at a rate of nearly one person each 10 seconds. Even though our population growth rate has been declining, the absolute growth numbers, and their implications, remain staggering. For example, if we average two persons per housing...
More

ECONOMIC ANALYSIS: Impact from small biz smaller than we think?Restricted Content

July 31, 2006
Patrick Barkey
The images are out there, reinforced almost every day. Big business is bad, led by overpaid executives who are out of touch and hire lobbyists to get laws changed in their favor. Or, worse yet, they drive smaller companies out of business. Small business, in contrast, is noble, led by energetic people following their dream, facing special challenges and deserving of our support. Nobody, it seems, is rooting for Wal-Mart to get bigger, and no one ever made a movie...
More

SMALL BUSINESS PROFILE: JP PARKER CO.: Business blooming for specialty florist Flower farm, retail shop feed green thumb's growthRestricted Content

July 31, 2006
Jo Ellen
SMALL BUSINESS PROFILE JP PARKER CO. Business blooming for specialty florist Flower farm, retail shop feed green thumb's growth More than 300,000 sunflowers are in various stages of growth on Needham, Ind., farmland, where a third generation carries on the family tradition with a modern twist. These tall summer annuals follow a spring where 1,000 blooming peony plants yielded at least 11,000 stems for a Chicago broker. Smaller plots of delphiniums, larkspur, zinnias, coneflowers, mints, herbs and other greenery also...
More

EYE ON THE PIE: Too much manufacturing is not Indiana's problemRestricted Content

July 24, 2006
Morton Marcus
We know that, relative to the United States, Indiana is neither a rich state nor one growing with vigor. Two weeks ago in this space, I discussed our more recent employment experiences. A friend read the column and asked, "How much of our lack of job growth is due to the slump or collapse in manufacturing jobs?" Nationally, only three states (Nevada, and the Dakotas) had any gain in manufacturing jobs between May 2001 and May 2006. Alaska and Wyoming...
More

New fiscal year, no cuts for IU School of Medicine: But concern remains about funds for future growthRestricted Content

July 24, 2006
Tom Murphy
No layoffs. No seven-figure budget cut to sweat through. IU School of Medicine Dean Dr. Craig Brater had many reasons to raise a toast this month, when a new fiscal year began and the school left behind an old one marked by the worst budget cuts in decades. Indeed, Brater said he is breathing a little easier as the school starts fiscal 2006-2007 with a budget of more than $815 million. An increase in clinical revenue and grant money helped...
More

ECONOMIC ANALYSIS: Will telecom reform bring cell service to remote areas?Restricted Content

July 17, 2006
Patrick Barkey
Those of us who spend a lot of time in airports get an effective education in the economics of competition by observing-and paying-the fares charged by airlines. It's really quite simple. Fly a route served by several airlines, especially if one of them is a low-cost, no-frills carrier such as Southwest, and fares will be reasonably low. But if you are unlucky enough to fly to or from a smaller city, or even a large one where a single carrier...
More

NOTIONS: How fear and loathing make the world go 'roundRestricted Content

July 17, 2006
Bruce Hetrick
In her social work class, my friend Cheri was assigned a paper on hate groups. The professor sent her master's degree students to the Southern Poverty Law Center's Web site. There, they were to find the map of active hate groups in America, read about those operating in Indiana and discuss their reactions to what they learned. Cheri was left wondering why so many people are so afraid of those they perceive as "different," and why "different" so often equates...
More

EYE ON THE PIE: Who needs economists, anyway?Restricted Content

July 17, 2006
Morton Marcus
Economists are not stupid people. They are timid and tend to hide their timidity behind a wall of overbearing self-confidence. But they are not stupid. In fact, often they are too smart to talk about what they do and do not know. As they wiggle over the rocks of uncertainty, they appear to others as either sneaky or formless. Let's take interest rates as an example. Economists like to talk about how, if the Fed raises interest rates, home mortgage...
More

VIEWPOINT: Consumers should take charge of healthRestricted Content

July 17, 2006
David Lee
In an environment where we're all being asked to pay a larger share of our own health care costs, it's interesting to see how little time we spend thinking about major decisions that have an impact on our health. Like selecting a primary care physician or any medical specialist, for example. According to a recent Managed Care Weekly Digest survey, 67 percent of U.S. adults ages 18-64 said they spent eight hours or more researching an automobile purchase, yet only...
More

THERE OUGHT TO BE A LAW: I'm just lounging by the side of the jury poolRestricted Content

July 10, 2006
Ron Gifford
I got something in the mail recently. Now, from my friends' overwrought reactions, you'd have thought it was an invitation to go hunting with Dick Cheney. But no, to my colleagues, this was even more frightening. "This" was my summons for jury duty. As for me, I thought it was kind of cool. OK, so it's not the prize patrol delivering my earlyretirement check. But the constitutional romantic in me was moved by the fact that I'd been summoned to...
More

VOICES FROM THE INDUSTRY: New law requires disclosure of business security breachesRestricted Content

July 10, 2006
Amie Peele
A new law that's designed to protect Indiana consumers changes the way businesses interact with their customers living in Indiana. Public Law 125, passed in the last session of the Indiana General Assembly and effective as of July 1, requires businesses to notify customers that reside in Indiana if there's been a security breach in which personal data has been stolen. The law defines "personal information" as a Social Security number that is not encrypted or redacted, or a person's...
More

RETURN ON TECHNOLOGY: We need more Googles to take on governmentRestricted Content

July 10, 2006
Tim Altom
As I write this, two of the biggest titans on the planet have just fought each other to a standstill. In one corner is the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ). In the other corner, the search engine company Google. In 2005, the DOJ wanted to revive the Child Online Protection Act (COPA), which had already been swatted down by the Supreme Court as unconstitutional. The law didn't address child pornography, as has often been assumed in the case, but only...
More

NOTIONS: Hailing the hare in the land of the tepid tortoiseRestricted Content

July 10, 2006
Bruce Hetrick
I was going to play smart aleck this week. I was going to write in hick dialect. I was going to lambaste us Hoosiers over our stubborn adherence to the status quo, our penchant to take things slow, our preference for partisanship, our pooh-poohing of progress and our bull-headed gumption to go it alone in a global economy. Then news broke that Indiana has the highest high school dropout rate in America. So I figured that for two reasons, I'd...
More

Westview soldiers on amid health care explosion: Hospital fares well against larger, newer competitionRestricted Content

July 10, 2006
Tom Murphy
A touch-screen directory, a grove of potted trees and a muffin-bearing kiosk greet visitors entering the six-story atrium at the new Clarian North Medical Center in Carmel. A much milder scene awaits people walking into Westview Hospital a few miles away, on the west side of Indianapolis. There, a lonely player piano spills soft tunes into a one-story lobby filled with clusters of chairs and pamphlets on volunteering. "Quiet! Healing in Progress" reads a nearby sign. Indiana's lone osteopathic hospital...
More

ECONOMIC ANALYSIS: State's 'circuit breaker' law worsens flawed tax systemRestricted Content

July 10, 2006
Patrick Barkey
Fifty years ago, economist Charles Tiebout expressed a vision of how freeing local governments to pursue their own unique strategies for setting taxes and providing services could produce an efficient outcome much like the private marketplace. He called it "voting with your feet." The idea was simple-by moving, people could sort themselves out and live in communities that came closest to providing the tax and expenditure combinations they valued most. Reality is quite a bit more complicated. When people move...
More

NOTIONS: Of sexual predators, pit bulls and oddly lesser evilsRestricted Content

July 3, 2006
Bruce Hetrick
God, she's cute: Your little Paula or Patti or Pammy. Sitting there on the swing set, rocking back and forth, back and forth, her brunette locks blowing in the breeze. You watch her on the merry-go-round, spinning faster and faster. Watch her on the jungle gym, climbing higher and higher. Watch her and her little friend Annie or Jenny or Missy walking toward the trail into the woods. And you know you aren't the only one watching. You know he's...
More

New leader brings spark to Black Chamber: Membership doubles to 100, but some in community question whether a separate organization is neededRestricted Content

July 3, 2006
Scott Olson
The walls of Turae Dabney's office at the Indianapolis Black Chamber of Commerce are covered in easel paper scribbled with enough notes to make an anal-retentive person dizzy. Though garbled to visitors, the pages hold the key to her vision for the organization she assumed leadership of as executive director earlier this year. "I do better if I visualize it," she said. "It looks like a mess, but I know exactly what everything means." The message she is sending to...
More

Doctor takes on state over Medicaid payments: Psychiatrist claims he's being forced out of businessRestricted Content

July 3, 2006
Tom Murphy
A Franklin psychiatrist has accused the state agency that runs Medicaid of suffocating his practice in a reimbursement dispute that dates back more than a year. Dr. John Lewis said the weekly Medicaid checks that keep his Harmony Center open dwindled to nothing for four straight weeks after he filed a lawsuit in April against the state Family and Social Services Administration over a payment review it imposed. The psychiatrist believes his center may survive only another month, a closing...
More

EYE ON THE PIE: Tattoos aren't only things we hideRestricted Content

July 3, 2006
Morton Marcus
I admit I don't understand the world in which I live. For example, a study in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology reports that 24 percent of Americans age 18 to 50 have one or more tattoos. That rises to 36 percent when we look at just those 18 to 29. I don't get it. Is this body art, a message to the world, a commitment to oneself or someone else? Tattoos do fill in all that empty...
More

CHRIS KATTERJOHN Commentary: Reflections on DST, GovernmentiumRestricted Content

June 26, 2006
I love it. It makes summer even better than it already was. I don't believe, as a friend of mine recently suggested, that DST is a plot by Republican businessmen to play more golf in the summer. No, it was a sound economic development move, and I'm glad the Legislature wised up and made it happen. Big picture, it's good for business. Speaking of which, I haven't talked to a single businessperson who's seriously complaining about the time change. If...
More

FINANCE: How will higher interest rates affect my loan?Restricted Content

June 26, 2006
Jean Wojtowicz
Every time the Q: Fe d e ra l Reserve raises rates, I expect to pay my bank more for financing. I guess I understand the reason for this-the government says it wants to guard against inflation-but the Fed's actions still make it hard for the small-business owner who needs to borrow money. How can I get the lowest possible rates? And what will my bank require of me that they don't now? Or is there any way around this...
More
Sponsored by
ADVERTISEMENT

facebook - twitter on Facebook & Twitter

Follow on TwitterFollow IBJ on Facebook:
Follow on TwitterFollow IBJ's Tweets on these topics:
 
Subscribe to IBJ
  1. These liberals are out of control. They want to drive our economy into the ground and double and triple our electric bills. Sierra Club, stay out of Indy!

  2. These activist liberal judges have gotten out of control. Thankfully we have a sensible supreme court that overturns their absurd rulings!

  3. Maybe they shouldn't be throwing money at the IRL or whatever they call it now. Probably should save that money for actual operations.

  4. For you central Indiana folks that don't know what a good pizza is, Aurelio's will take care of that. There are some good pizza places in central Indiana but nothing like this!!!

  5. I am troubled with this whole string of comments as I am not sure anyone pointed out that many of the "high paying" positions have been eliminated identified by asterisks as of fiscal year 2012. That indicates to me that the hospitals are making responsible yet difficult decisions and eliminating heavy paying positions. To make this more problematic, we have created a society of "entitlement" where individuals believe they should receive free services at no cost to them. I have yet to get a house repair done at no cost nor have I taken my car that is out of warranty for repair for free repair expecting the government to pay for it even though it is the second largest investment one makes in their life besides purchasing a home. Yet, we continue to hear verbal and aggressive abuse from the consumer who expects free services and have to reward them as a result of HCAHPS surveys which we have no influence over as it is 3rd party required by CMS. Peel the onion and get to the root of the problem...you will find that society has created the problem and our current political landscape and not the people who were fortunate to lead healthcare in the right direction before becoming distorted. As a side note, I had a friend sit in an ED in Canada for nearly two days prior to being evaluated and then finally...3 months later got a CT of the head. You pay for what you get...

ADVERTISEMENT