Government

Quality Roofing Services: Success helps roofers sleep through the night After surviving a rough first year, company shows signs of progressRestricted Content

June 19, 2006
Susan Raccoli
After surviving a rough first year, company shows signs of progress Sleepless nights, upset stomachs and paranoia were common woes for the owners of Quality Roofing Services throughout their first year in business. "We worried about finances and thunderstorms," said co-owner Paul Crafton, 50, recalling the professional and personal strain. "We wondered if we would make our payroll or go under and lose our investment." But they persevered, starting their days early-often at 5:30 a.m.-and working late. Eventually, their efforts...
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NOTIONS: A tale of two kings and one fortunate kingdomRestricted Content

June 12, 2006
Bruce Hetrick
For the fifth year, some colleagues and I have penned comedy for a cause. The Indiana Repertory Theatre, which usually chooses its playwrights more carefully, erred again by soliciting our scriptwriting "talent" for its faux-radioshow fund-raiser. So on June 3, a cast of Indianapolis celebrities-from the media, not-for-profits, government and business-donned makeshift 17th-century garb, mounted the Indiana Roof Ballroom stage, and hammed up "Shakespeared: A Midsummer Night's Scheme." Our tall tale featured two kings-Mitchard and Bartholomie-trying to outdo each other...
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From Ukraine with love: Helping the elderly remain independent and at home is the fundamental goal of home-health-agency founderRestricted Content

June 12, 2006
Della Pacheco
When Etelka Froymovich immigrated to Indianapolis in 1977, the Ukrainian-born pediatric nurse found the only job available to her was as an aide at Colonial Crest, a local nursing home later purchased by Arkansas-based Beverly Enterprises. She had never worked with the elderly, but quickly found her life's passion. Twenty years after arriving in the city, Froymovich opened Home Services Unlimited, a licensed home-health care agency on the northwest side that provides care for elderly and developmentally disabled people. Overcoming...
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eImagine Technology Group: Technology firm aims to deliver service with its software Owner: Hiring good employees key to small company's successRestricted Content

June 12, 2006
Julie Young
Communication-and simplicity-can be a challenge when it comes to tech talk. "It's like the old adage, if you ask a tech guy what time it is, he'll tell you how to build a watch," said Joel Russell, president of Indianapolis-based software developer eImagine Technology Group. But Russell works around potential "lingo" problems when he's meeting with customers. No matter the industry, he looks for ways to automate inefficient processes using computer software. His goal is to save his clients time...
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BRIAN WILLIAMS Commentary: Program opens eyes to community needsRestricted Content

June 12, 2006
In 1973, an automobile accident inspired a mother to create a dynamic memorial to the accomplishments of her son and for the benefit of the community in which he lived. For 30 years, the Stanley K. Lacy Executive Leadership Series has offered a unique perspective to 25 individuals on the issues confronting our city and region. Guided by a moderator through tours, seminars, reading and interaction with experts, the participants debate education, government, health and human services, the justice system,...
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VOICES FROM THE INDUSTRY: Increased export scrutiny requires corporate-wide planRestricted Content

June 12, 2006
Thomas Ladd
While federal laws restricting exports of goods and technology have been in existence since the 1940s, companies and individuals have increasingly faced civil and criminal penalties that include millions of dollars in fines, prohibition from future exporting and even prison terms. flagged and identified on the denied party list? Simply put, is the end user of the product or technology identified by the U.S. government as one banned from receiving such technologies? Customer service representatives need to know whether the...
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Geographic restrictions could backfire for PERF: $105 million fund carries lots of potential, risksRestricted Content

June 12, 2006
Peter Schnitzler
By restricting the new $105 million Indiana Investment Fund I to deals within state lines, Gov. Mitch Daniels hopes to simultaneously spur economic development and earn a spectacular return for Indiana's retired public employees. But venture-capital experts warn it's nearly impossible to have it both ways. "You need to be very, very clear what your objectives are when you invest [pension] money. Is it for economic development or to help the pensioners earn better pensions?" said John Taylor, vice president...
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EYE ON THE PIE: What if we moved the elderly out of state?Restricted Content

June 12, 2006
Morton Marcus
"Don't write about this," Sid Simpleton told me. He is the state's social policy director. "People who have recently experienced the loss of a loved one do not like death discussed without appropriate gravity." "I'll warn them not to read the column if they have recently had such a loss," I said. Sipping gin and tonics on a warm spring afternoon does make the troubles of the world seem less serious. "OK, if you think it's safe," Sid said. "This...
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"No habla ingles": Immigrants who want to advance find many programs to help them learn EnglishRestricted Content

June 5, 2006
Chris O\'malley
No habla inglesImmigrants who want to advance find many programs to help them learn English Osvaldo Escobedo was hungry to learn English. It was bad enough when he couldn't advance at the Nissan Motor Co. plant in Aguascalientes, in central Mexico, because he couldn't converse in the business language of English. Later, when he came to the United States, he couldn't eat much more than what he could pronounce. "When I go to restaurant, I ask [for] 'coffee and doughnuts....
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2005 sees another drop in health insurance complaints: Regulators work to refine method for tracking problemsRestricted Content

June 5, 2006
Tom Murphy
Complaint totals sank steeply last year for many Indiana health insurers, partly because the state insurance department continues to revamp its often-maligned method of tracking them. Regulators recorded 1,232 signed complaints last year, a 30-percent drop from 2004, according to figures published on the consumer section of the Indiana Department of Insurance Web site. The drop from earlier years is even steeper. The department recorded 3,133 complaints in 2002 and 1,848 the next year. Many of Indiana's largest insurers also...
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EYE ON THE PIE: Let's tax phone, Internet, TV usageRestricted Content

May 29, 2006
Morton Marcus
Felicity Futenmouth and I went to graduate school together. Her career in economics focused on consumer services provided by such first-class firms as MegaMedia, MegaMarkets and MegaMercenaries. We became reacquainted lately at our class's 35th reunion. Over a nightcap of hot chocolate and biscuits, she enticed me with a coy question: "How do you feel about local taxes?" "I am all for them," I responded. "If you don't have local taxes, you don't have a strong claim on the responsibility...
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RETURN ON TECHNOLOGY: RFID security not as secure as you think it isRestricted Content

May 29, 2006
Tim Altom
I work in a building that makes me use a cardkey to get into the building's back stairway. I can't even use a physical key. I must use the card I was issued. I fumble for the thing every morning. One morning, to my astonishment, I noticed that if I pushed hard enough on the door as I opened it, it would hit the end of its travel and thereafter stand open by itself. The first person through in the...
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VIEWPOINT: To be a logistics leader, state needs a planRestricted Content

May 29, 2006
Bob Palmer
Indiana is poised to become the country's logistics center. Recently, there has been a lot of discussion on that topic. Now is the time for business, government and education to come together and make it happen. SupplyNet 2006-the recent statewide conference that brought together not only transportation, distribution and logistics industries, but also representatives from manufacturing, retail, information technology, government and academia-detailed the broader picture of supplychain management. As a cutting-edge business strategy, supply-chain management integrates internal and external logistics...
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CHRIS KATTERJOHN Commentary: IUPUI grads help tsunami victimsRestricted Content

May 29, 2006
Many parents today fret over their kids' obsession with computers, video games and the Internet. "All he does is sit at that stupid computer." If I heard that once, I've heard it a million times. But sometimes, when young people's passion for the digital frontier intersects with compassion for their fellow man, great things can happen. Such is the case with Chris Podell and Zachary Shields, two recent graduates of the new media and arts program at the IUPUI School...
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Artery severed, but life goes on TOM HARTON Commentary:Restricted Content

May 22, 2006
Jane Jacobs, the noted urbanist, fought a battle in the late 1960s that prevented a freeway from wiping out the neighborhoods of lower Manhattan. Tom Battista, a local entrepreneur, is fighting-and some would say winning-the battle that becomes necessary when a freeway does wipe out a neighborhood. When Jacobs died last month she was famous for two things: her book, "The Death and Life of Great American Cities," written in 1961, which eloquently stated the need for diversity, density and...
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BOOK REVIEWS: "Best Face Forward: Why Companies Must Improve Their Service Interfaces with Customers"Restricted Content

May 22, 2006
Jeffrey F.
Customers got their first inkling 25 years ago when ATM machines were introduced. Another hint came along 10 years later when voice mail arrived. The trickle of computerized customer-service inter actions became a flood as we started using devices like parking-garage ticket machines, airline ticket kiosks, telephone voice trees and self-service checkouts for groceries and library books. Internet transactions such as online shopping, banking and purchasing movie tickets also entered the scene. Interacting with these "smart technologies," which seemed odd...
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Suit puts One Call on hold: Firm placed in receivership as lender seeks $21 millionRestricted Content

May 22, 2006
Chris O\'malley
One Call Communications has been placed in receivership, a day after a lender for its 2002 management buyout filed a lawsuit alleging the Carmel long-distance and operator-services company owes it more than $21 million. The May 11 lawsuit in U.S. District Court in Indianapolis by Pittsburgh-based PNC Bank appears to be the knockout blow for a telecommunications firm accused by several states of violating consumer protection laws in billing and collection practices. Also looming is a proposed $1.1 million fine...
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ATA reorg a bonanza for lawyers, financial firms: Court still must decide whether to approve $21 million in fees and expenses sought in case so farRestricted Content

May 15, 2006
Chris O\'malley
Lawyers and other professionals have asked for more than $21 million in fees and expenses for their work on ATA Holdings Corp.'s reorganization, in what appears to be the most expensive case ever in U.S. District Bankruptcy Court for the Southern District of Indiana. But fees and expenses might rise to $33 million after a handful of remaining professional firms file their claims by the end of this month, said James Carr, a veteran Baker & Daniels attorney who quarterbacked...
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ECONOMIC ANALYSIS: Improving state's economy requires a team approachRestricted Content

May 15, 2006
Patrick Barkey
More than 50 years ago, the famous economist Joseph Schumpeter told a simple story that perfectly captured the essence of market capitalism. It's a turn-of-the-century tale of a railroad being built in a part of the country where none had existed. The new investment rapidly upsets the order of everything-once ideally situated towns are left high and dry, while others move up in stature as they exploit newfound advantages. It's messy and it's painful, but the result is for the...
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Money manager launches own firm: Former SBK-Brooks exec opens Liger SecuritiesRestricted Content

May 15, 2006
Scott Olson
If David B. Girton isn't already regarded as an innovator in the local investment brokerage community, he should be now. The 45-year-old Indianapolis native is in the process of launching Liger Securities Corp., the only locally owned black investment firm in the city. But 10 years ago, he accomplished a similar first, when he opened the local office of Cleveland-based SBK-Brooks Investment Corp., then the only black-operated brokerage here. Make no mistake, though, Girton's credentials far outweigh his designation as...
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EYE ON THE PIE: Writers require clarity or risk calamityRestricted Content

May 15, 2006
Morton Marcus
Last night, I had a dream. I was standing on the ledge of a tall building. People down below were shouting, "Jump!" They were angry because they thought I misrepresented the various and diverse meal-delivery programs in Indiana in my column last week. One woman was yelling, "You're trying to take away my job!" "No," I tried to explain. I was just saying that such programs should be coordinated better and that no oversight agency exists to monitor not-for-profit agencies....
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Daniels seeks to copy key-clusters strategy: Industry initiatives would mimic BioCrossroads planRestricted Content

May 15, 2006
Peter Schnitzler
If imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, BioCrossroads has been vindicated. Gov. Mitch Daniels hopes to see a series of similar industry initiatives sprout around key clusters in Indiana's economy. He envisions parallel initiatives for manufacturing, transportation and logistics and a series of other crucial business sectors. "We'd love some company," said BioCrossroads CEO David Johnson. As outlined in Daniels' "Accelerating Growth" economic development plan released last month, the initiatives would be based on proven Indiana strengths and identifiable...
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Selling change at Lilly: Company overhauls strategy its thousands of sales reps use to tout drugs to doctorsRestricted Content

May 15, 2006
Tom Murphy
Eli Lilly and Co. is rolling out a new approach to selling drugs, one that aims to build deeper relationships with doctors while cutting the number of sales reps knocking on their office door. The reorganization project, dubbed "sales force of the future," is just what the doctor ordered, according to Lilly executives. They say physicians want fewer sales calls and a deeper knowledge base from those who still stop by. "Doctors want that primarily because they're treating patients and...
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Smaller banks seeking relief: Legislation takes on costly regulatory costsRestricted Content

May 15, 2006
Scott Olson
German American Bancorp in Jasper has spent more than $1 million the past two years complying with the stringent accounting provisions of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act. The cost alone is reason enough for the community bank's president and CEO, Mark Schroeder, to support a measure exempting smaller public companies such as his from Section 404 of the act. He even traveled to Washington, D.C., May 3 to testify in front of the U.S. House of Representatives Small Business Committee. "Ultimately, this...
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CHRIS KATTERJOHN Commentary: Now we have a plan-let's use itRestricted Content

May 15, 2006
For years, Indiana politicians-at least the smart ones-have talked about the importance of economic growth and development, and behind the scenes business leaders have replied, "Duh. How about coming up with some kind of plan?" This was always a hot button for Dave Goodrich, retired real estate executive and former head of Central Indiana Corporate Partnership. In his days at CICP, Goodrich would bend the ear of anyone willing to listen about the need for a plan. Well, how does...
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  1. With Pence running the ship good luck with a new government building on the site. He does everything on the cheap except unnecessary roads line a new beltway( like we need that). Things like state of the art office buildings and light rail will never be seen as an asset to these types. They don't get that these are the things that help a city prosper.

  2. Does the $100,000,000,000 include salaries for members of Congress?

  3. "But that doesn't change how the piece plays to most of the people who will see it." If it stands out so little during the day as you seem to suggest maybe most of the people who actually see it will be those present when it is dark enough to experience its full effects.

  4. That's the mentality of most retail marketers. In this case Leo was asked to build the brand. HHG then had a bad sales quarter and rather than stay the course, now want to go back to the schlock that Zimmerman provides (at a considerable cut in price.) And while HHG salesmen are, by far, the pushiest salesmen I have ever experienced, I believe they are NOT paid on commission. But that doesn't mean they aren't trained to be aggressive.

  5. The reason HHG's sales team hits you from the moment you walk through the door is the same reason car salesmen do the same thing: Commission. HHG's folks are paid by commission they and need to hit sales targets or get cut, while BB does not. The sales figures are aggressive, so turnover rate is high. Electronics are the largest commission earners along with non-needed warranties, service plans etc, known in the industry as 'cheese'. The wholesale base price is listed on the cryptic price tag in the string of numbers near the bar code. Know how to decipher it and you get things at cost, with little to no commission to the sales persons. Whether or not this is fair, is more of a moral question than a financial one.

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