Government

Indiana minority investment fund deemed small but promisingRestricted Content

June 29, 2013
New fund is one of few in the nation focused on minority businesses.
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Indiana adds jobs; unemployment rate slips

May 17, 2013
Indiana added 4,400 nonfarm jobs in April and the unemployment rate fell slightly, to 8.5 percent, the Indiana Department of Workforce Development reported Friday morning.
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FARRA: Don't expect big dividends from banks anytime soon

May 11, 2013
George Farra / Special to IBJ
Banks will not return to their status as reliable sources of shareholder dividends for three years or longer.
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Former Gov. Bowen dies

May 5, 2013
Associated Press
Otis R. Bowen, a small-town family doctor who overhauled Indiana's tax system as governor before helping promote safe sex practices in the early years of AIDS as the top federal health official under President Ronald Reagan, died Saturday. He was 95.
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New lights only the beginning for Brickyard changesRestricted Content

April 27, 2013
Anthony Schoettle
Everything is on the table for consideration, says new Hulman & Co. CEO Mark Miles.
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Feds probing Indiana's workplace safety agency

April 12, 2013
Associated Press
The federal government's workplace safety agency is investigating its Indiana counterpart—a department that documents indicate is trying to boost its inspections without hiring new staffers.
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Medical finance driving major changes in health care marketplace

April 6, 2013
J.K. Wall
Brian and Emily Kahn had virtually identical physical therapy. He paid much more than she did. Why? Because of where the therapy took place.
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Push for I-70 truck lanes hits roadblock in studyRestricted Content

March 30, 2013
Scott Olson
Economy, high cost of construction cited as factors.
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Pence touring agribusinesses

March 28, 2013
Associated Press
Governor, along with Lt. Gov. Ellspermann and ag director Gina Sheets, hopes to discuss potential for growth.
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Prosecutors seek tough sentence for Sheridan man

March 27, 2013
Associated Press
Lowell Hancher has admitted to stealing more than $500,000 from an Iowa manufacturer.
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Studies: Employers could save with Medicaid expansion

March 18, 2013
J.K. Wall
The debate over expanding Medicaid in Indiana so far has hinged on how much it will cost. But two recent studies suggest Hoosier employers should be focused on how much a Medicaid expansion will save them: perhaps as much as $400 million per year.
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Three years after opening, Indiana Design Center fillsRestricted Content

February 23, 2013
Norm Heikens
Tenants include interior designers, artists, kitchen cabinet firms.
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Indiana coal industry scrambling to save its futureRestricted Content

February 16, 2013
Chris O'Malley
Options include increasing exports as opposition to coal-fired electricity generation heats up at both national and local levels.
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Indiana town takes unusual step to gain control of utilityRestricted Content

February 16, 2013
Scott Olson
Mooresville’s bid to purchase water operations likely will be decided in court.
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Is Indianapolis becoming too expensive for conventions?Restricted Content

February 9, 2013
Anthony Schoettle
A recent tax increase coupled with cut-rate competition from other cities has Indianapolis-area convention and meeting officials fretting about losing a longtime cost advantage.
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Health insurance changes daunting for Indiana employersRestricted Content

January 19, 2013
Scott Olson
A portion of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act requiring companies in 2014 to begin offering health insurance to more workers is causing a lot of anxiety.
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SHORT: Obsolete laws, regulations stifle advance of 'telehealth'Restricted Content

January 19, 2013
Jeffrey W. Short / Special to IBJ
You might remember seeing Elroy Jetson sitting in front of a television in the Jetson home, with Astro, his trusty dog, and Jane, his mother, at his side, while the doctor appeared on the screen providing medical care to Elroy. This scene is no longer so futuristic.
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THOMPSON: Push is on to regulate health information technologyRestricted Content

November 24, 2012
Bradley Merrill Thompson / Special to IBJ
After decades of slow adoption, health information technology now threatens to completely disrupt health care, in a good way, dramatically improving quality of care. The question is, will federal regulators stand in the way?
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SCHAFIR: Businesses face tough decisions over health careRestricted Content

November 24, 2012
Harlan Schafir / Special to IBJ
Now that the election is over, it seems clearer that the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare, will likely move forward. The question is whether business owners will be able to steer their employees to state exchanges and wash their hands of health care coverage.
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Justice sets up campaign website

October 19, 2012
Associated Press
Justice Steven David must pass a yes or no vote in the Nov. 6 election to remain on the state's highest court. But opponents want David ousted.
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HIATT: Political campaign puts private equity in the spotlightRestricted Content

October 13, 2012
Tom Hiatt / Special to IBJ
In the current political campaign, private equity, the industry in which I have spent much of my career, finds itself in the spotlight. But in my conversations with other intelligent people, I often find they are curious about what private equity funds do.
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BRODY: Accountable care organizations improve health careRestricted Content

September 29, 2012
Robert Brody / Special to IBJ
As we began looking at accountable care organizations, we clearly understood that this new model complemented our existing approach and had potential to significantly affect care, leading to better communication, better coordination of care, and better outcomes for patients.
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STORY: Health care rationing has already arrivedRestricted Content

September 29, 2012
Timothy J. Story / Special to IBJ
There will be health care rationing. The only question is who will do the rationing—the government, health care providers, or you and me. The odds are good there will be some rationing from all those sources
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TIF expert is adviser to many municipalitiesRestricted Content

September 15, 2012
Scott Olson
Loren Matthes helped broker first tax-increment financing deal in the state
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Commuter subsidies often go unnoticedRestricted Content

September 8, 2012
Mason King
In a dark little corner of the tax code known as Section 132(f), the IRS lets employers provide tax-free benefits—typically, payroll deductions and/or subsidies—to employees for commuting costs. That includes vans, buses, bikes, trains, and even parking. And both parties can save, since they’re not getting dinged for their respective taxes on the amount of the benefit.
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  1. Socialized medicine works great for white people in Scandanavia. It works well in Costa Rica for a population that is partly white and partly mestizo. I don't really see Obamacare as something aimed against whites. I think that is a Republican canard designed to elicit support from white people for republican candidates who don't care about them any more than democrats care about the non-whites they pander to with their phony maneuvers. But what is different between Costa Rica nd the Scandanavian nations on one hand and the US on the other? SIZE. Maybe the US is just too damn big. Maybe it just needs to be divided into smaller self governing pieces like when the old Holy Roman Empire was dismantled. Maybe we are always trying the same set of solutions for different kinds of people as if we were all the same. Oh-- I know-- that is liberal dogma, that we are all the same. Which is the most idiotic American notion going right back to the propaganda of 1776. All men are different and their differences are myriad and that which is different is not equal. The state which pretends men are all the same is going to force men to be the same. That is what America does here, that is what we do in our stupid overseas wars, that is how we destroy true diversity and true difference, and we are all as different groups of folks, feeling the pains of how capitalism is grinding us down into equally insignificant proletarian microconsumers with no other identity whether we like it or not. And the Marxists had this much right about the War of Independence: it was fundamentally a war of capitalist against feudal systems. America has been about big money since day one and whatever gets in the way is crushed. Health care is just another market and Obamacare, to the extent that it Rationalizes and makes more uniform a market which should actually be really different in nature and delivery from place to place-- well that will serve the interests of the biggest capitalist stakeholders in health care which is not Walmart for Gosh Sakes it is the INSURANCE INDUSTRY. CUI BONO Obamacare? The insurance industry. So republicans drop the delusion pro capitalist scales from your eyes this has almost nothing to do with race or "socialism" it has to do mostly with what the INSURANCE INDUSTRY wants to have happen in order to make their lives and profits easier.

  2. Read the article - the reason they can't justify staying is they have too many medicare/medicaid patients and the re-imbursements for transporting these patient is so low.

  3. I would not vote for Bayh if he did run. I also wouldn't vote for Pence. My guess is that Bayh does not have the stomach to oppose persons on the far left or far right. Also, outside of capitalizing on his time as U. S. Senator (and his wife's time as a board member to several companies) I don't know if he is willing to fight for anything. If people who claim to be in the middle walk away from fights with the right and left wing, what are we left with? Extremes. It's probably best for Bayh if he does not have the stomach for the fight but the result is no middle ground.

  4. JK - I meant that the results don't ring true. I also questioned the 10-year-old study because so much in the "health care system" has changed since the study was made. Moreover, it was hard to get to any overall conclusion or observation with the article. But....don't be defensive given my comments; I still think you do the best job of any journalist in the area shedding light and insight on important health care issues.

  5. Probably a good idea he doesn't run. I for one do not want someone who lives in VIRGINIA to be the governor. He gave it some thought, but he likes Virginia too much. What a name I cannot say on this site! The way these people think and operate amuses me.

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