Graduation Rates

Ben Davis school boasts impressive graduation ratesRestricted Content

January 12, 2013
Scott Olson
Seniors are earning their diploma while receiving a associate's degree.
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Fewer Indiana schools considered 'dropout factories'

March 19, 2012
Associated Press
The number of Indiana high schools considered "dropout factories" fell by half between 2002 and 2010, from 30 to 15, according to a report released Monday.
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Graduation rates rise in Marion County, state

February 7, 2012
Nearly 200 more students graduated from Marion County’s public high schools last year than in the previous year, pushing the county’s graduation rate up a notch, to 81.7 percent.
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Indiana schools chief lauds overhaul in annual speech

September 13, 2011
Associated Press
Indiana Schools Superintendent Tony Bennett used his second annual assessment of the state's education system to promote a sweeping overhaul approved this year.
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Goodwill to open two more Excel centers

August 23, 2011
J.K. Wall
The schools, which help high-school dropouts earn their diplomas and start to receive post-secondary training, plan to enroll 300 students near the Indiana State Fairgrounds and 150 near the airport.
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Indiana edges toward education guaranteesRestricted Content

June 11, 2011
J.K. Wall
The state is moving to adopt a system that ensures more high school graduates can perform in college or on the job.
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Chamber props up graduation initiativeRestricted Content

January 8, 2011
J.K. Wall
A cash crunch at its Common Goal education program forced the Greater Indianapolis Chamber of Commerce this month to start covering the program’s bills out of its coffers.
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Governor wants revamped teacher evaluations

December 31, 2010
Associated Press
Republican Gov. Mitch Daniels and state schools superintendent Tony Bennett say Indiana needs a more honest look at the job teachers and principals are doing.
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United Way hires public policy chief to focus on education issues

October 30, 2010
 IBJ Staff
The position at United Way of Central Indiana had been vacant because of budget issues.
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CORLEY: Help a child and who knows where he'll go?

July 17, 2010
William Corley
Consider these alarming statistics: More than 6,700 Marion County students drop out of school every single year. Dropouts earn $9,200 less per year than high school graduates, and earn $1 million less over a lifetime than college graduates.
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Small schools give bang for buck

April 10, 2010
Economist Morton Marcus [on March 29] took issue with the notion that college and university graduation rates can be improved by tying compensation to increases (or decreases) in institutional graduation rates.
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Need quality, quantity in higher ed

April 10, 2010
In his [March 29] column, “Set sights on education, not graduation,” Morton Marcus raises a vital point about Indiana’s higher education reform efforts—but he overlooks a larger one.
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EDITORIAL: It takes money to raise graduation rates

April 3, 2010
 IBJ Staff
After the 2008-2009 school year—the first of the Greater Indianapolis Chamber of Commerce’s four-year Common Goal program, the overall graduation rate among public schools in Marion County had jumped from 69 percent to almost 74 percent.
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State high school graduation rates keep rising

January 8, 2010
J.K. Wall
According to data released Friday by the Indiana Department of Education, 81.2 percent of Hoosier high school students scheduled to graduate in 2009 did.
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State's college graduation rates bedevil education experts

October 31, 2009
J.K. Wall
Just over half of students at state-supported, four-year institutions in Indiana graduate within six years—a tremendous waste of resources by both students and taxpayers. The number of citizens with bachelor’s degrees is one of the surest indicators of economic success in a 21st century economy driven less by workers’ hands and more by their heads.
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New higher-ed chief takes aim at dropout rates

August 3, 2009
J.K. Wall
Teresa Lubbers became Indiana commissioner for higher education on July 7 after serving 17 years as a Republican state senator from Indianapolis. She says every Hoosier needs some college-level training. Lubbers got a running start on her new job, having served as chairwoman of the senate education committee for years. She also worked frequently at the commission’s downtown offices during May and June—after her predecessor had left but before the Legislature returned for a special session to pass a budget. Her new staff dubbed her SenComm.
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KATTERJOHN: Leaders in education primed for successRestricted Content

June 22, 2009
Chris Katterjohn
There's reason to believe serious progress is coming, due to the people in leadership positions for the state in three key areas: the Department of Education, the Commission for Higher Education and Ivy Tech Community College.
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Pay for diplomas is smart incentiveRestricted Content

May 25, 2009
Incentives have long been used as an effective tool in business to improve employee performance. But can a concept that helps companies motivate workers also work in public education?
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Bennett draws up education game planRestricted Content

April 20, 2009
J.K. Wall
Indiana's superintendent of public instruction stresses reading, math and competition.
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Low graduation rates bode poorly for stateRestricted Content

March 30, 2009
With high school graduation rates as low as they are in Indiana, I find it amazing that Indiana isn't at the very bottom of the statistical ladder described in Morton Marcus' March 16 column.
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Project plants seeds of academic successRestricted Content

February 16, 2009
United Way is spending $114,000 to bring Project Seed, a program with specially trained math experts, to 11 Indianapolis Public Schools.
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Indiana's new superintendent of public instruction ready to tackle challengesRestricted Content

November 24, 2008
Scott Olson
Tony Bennett, Indiana's new superintendent of public instruction, says his priorities include restoring discipline to the classroom, recruiting topnotch teachers and adequately compensating them, increasing the percentage of education dollars spent directly on instruction, and reducing regulations so schools can focus more on student instruction.
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IPS superintendent doesn't shy away from challengesRestricted Content

December 3, 2007
Tracy Donhardt
Indianapolis Public Schools Superintendent Eugene White, in his third year as head of the state's largest school district, is determined to reverse the long decline of the state's largest school district. The status quo is not an option.
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Ivy Tech boasts healthy enrollment, but most students wither on vineRestricted Content

April 23, 2007
Chris O'Malley
Ivy Tech Community College--charged with cranking out workers to fill high-demand jobs in critical occupations--has an output rate reminiscent of an old, state-owned Soviet assembly line. Incoming President Thomas Snyder is taking over a community college system that graduates only 12 percent of its students within three years.
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  1. The $104K to CRC would go toward debts service on $486M of existing debt they already have from other things outside this project. Keystone buys the bonds for 3.8M from CRC, and CRC in turn pays for the parking and site work, and some time later CRC buys them back (with interest) from the projected annual property tax revenue from the entire TIF district (est. $415K / yr. from just this property, plus more from all the other property in the TIF district), which in theory would be about a 10-year term, give-or-take. CRC is basically betting on the future, that property values will increase, driving up the tax revenue to the limit of the annual increase cap on commercial property (I think that's 3%). It should be noted that Keystone can't print money (unlike the Federal Treasury) so commercial property tax can only come from consumers, in this case the apartment renters and consumers of the goods and services offered by the ground floor retailers, and employees in the form of lower non-mandatory compensation items, such as bonuses, benefits, 401K match, etc.

  2. $3B would hurt Lilly's bottom line if there were no insurance or Indemnity Agreement, but there is no way that large an award will be upheld on appeal. What's surprising is that the trial judge refused to reduce it. She must have thought there was evidence of a flagrant, unconscionable coverup and wanted to send a message.

  3. As a self-employed individual, I always saw outrageous price increases every year in a health insurance plan with preexisting condition costs -- something most employed groups never had to worry about. With spouse, I saw ALL Indiana "free market answer" plans' premiums raise 25%-45% each year.

  4. It's not who you chose to build it's how they build it. Architects and engineers decide how and what to use to build. builders just do the work. Architects & engineers still think the tarp over the escalators out at airport will hold for third time when it snows, ice storms.

  5. http://www.abcactionnews.com/news/duke-energy-customers-angry-about-money-for-nothing

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