Hamilton County CVB

Indiana tourism group sharpens mission

July 26, 2014
Anthony Schoettle
New director changes organization’s name, launches initiatives catering to businesses.
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DINING: Newcomer Chuy’s stands out in crowded Tex-Mex field

May 10, 2014
Lou Harry
It's difficult to imagine a chain Tex-Mex restaurant generating much excitement. But crowds are flocking to the Hamilton Town Center newcomer.
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Hamilton County tourism agency changes name

February 28, 2014
Anthony Schoettle
Starting Monday, the Hamilton County Convention and Visitors Bureau will change its name to Hamilton County Tourism Inc. to better reflect its mission.
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Hamilton County tourism getting sweeping updateRestricted Content

November 9, 2013
Anthony Schoettle
Officials tout sophistication, Internet focus in attempt to shed folksy image.
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'Dynamic duo' boosts Hamilton County tourismRestricted Content

September 28, 2013
Anthony Schoettle
In eight years with the Hamilton County Convention and Visitors Bureau, Executive Director Brenda Myers has morphed her organization into a developer, grant giver and landlord. The strategy appears to be working.
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Outlying counties, tired of waiting for Indianapolis convention spillover, set own strategiesRestricted Content

June 1, 2009
Anthony Schoettle
Some industry insiders worry that, while Indianapolis is busy chasing bigger conventions, adjoining counties may raid the cupboard made plentiful by investments within Marion County, particularly downtown.
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Indiana themed food trails will court culinary touristsRestricted Content

October 1, 2007
Jennifer Whitson
The Mississippi Delta has its hot tamale trail. Alabama and Texas boast a Southern BBQ byway. Now Indiana is getting in the game with planned candy and pork tenderloin trails. State boosters are looking to tap into a growing travel industry niche: culinary tourism.
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  1. The $104K to CRC would go toward debts service on $486M of existing debt they already have from other things outside this project. Keystone buys the bonds for 3.8M from CRC, and CRC in turn pays for the parking and site work, and some time later CRC buys them back (with interest) from the projected annual property tax revenue from the entire TIF district (est. $415K / yr. from just this property, plus more from all the other property in the TIF district), which in theory would be about a 10-year term, give-or-take. CRC is basically betting on the future, that property values will increase, driving up the tax revenue to the limit of the annual increase cap on commercial property (I think that's 3%). It should be noted that Keystone can't print money (unlike the Federal Treasury) so commercial property tax can only come from consumers, in this case the apartment renters and consumers of the goods and services offered by the ground floor retailers, and employees in the form of lower non-mandatory compensation items, such as bonuses, benefits, 401K match, etc.

  2. $3B would hurt Lilly's bottom line if there were no insurance or Indemnity Agreement, but there is no way that large an award will be upheld on appeal. What's surprising is that the trial judge refused to reduce it. She must have thought there was evidence of a flagrant, unconscionable coverup and wanted to send a message.

  3. As a self-employed individual, I always saw outrageous price increases every year in a health insurance plan with preexisting condition costs -- something most employed groups never had to worry about. With spouse, I saw ALL Indiana "free market answer" plans' premiums raise 25%-45% each year.

  4. It's not who you chose to build it's how they build it. Architects and engineers decide how and what to use to build. builders just do the work. Architects & engineers still think the tarp over the escalators out at airport will hold for third time when it snows, ice storms.

  5. http://www.abcactionnews.com/news/duke-energy-customers-angry-about-money-for-nothing

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