Health Care & Insurance

Health care marketers taking the pulse of consumers' online habitsRestricted Content

July 20, 2009
Christina Galoozis
Health care marketers can adapt to, and even use to their advantage, the online search habits of consumers. Understanding when and why people search for specific health-related terms is vital to attracting more visitors (i.e. patients) to a Web site.
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State law aims to attract doctors to areas in need of careRestricted Content

July 20, 2009
Scott Olson
A state law that went into effect July 1 attempts to attract young physicians and mental health practitioners to underserved areas by forgiving part of their student loans. But Indiana’s budget woes prevented lawmakers from allocating funds to support the program.
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BATTEN: FTC could resolve antitrust concerns on health care reformRestricted Content

July 20, 2009
Linda M. Batten
President Obama recently announced a cooperative initiative where health care industry leaders plan to work together to reform the ailing health care system. Shortly after that announcement, the national media machine spawned considerable concern among several health care groups that the cooperative effort might violate federal antitrust laws for collusion and price fixing among competitors.
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Drug industry funds Democrat-led panel on health care reformRestricted Content

July 20, 2009
J.K. Wall
The pharmaceutical industry—which for two decades has given twice as much in campaign donations to Republicans as Democrats—organized a panel composed mostly of Democrats this month in Indianapolis to argue its position on health care reform.
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PEASE: Archaic physical therapy laws drive up health costsRestricted Content

July 20, 2009
Brian Pease
If you want to see a physical therapist in Indiana, you must first see a physician for a consultation and referral. It’s the law. Indiana is one of only six states where patients are denied direct access to physical therapy treatment, and one of only two states where evaluation without referral is prohibited.
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Long-term-care business to help Wishard cover construction debtRestricted Content

July 20, 2009
J.K. Wall
To pay for a shiny new downtown hospital, the parent corporation of Wishard Health Services will commit itself to yearly debt payments 10 times as high as they are now. But Wishard officials have no doubt they can bear the extra load because of places like Rosewalk Village, a nursing home that sits on the eastern side of Indianapolis.
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Hilbert in-law's life insurance dispute takes odd turn

July 13, 2009
Peter Schnitzler
Local businessman J.B. Carlson contends the $15 million life insurance policy he took out on Stephen Hilbert’s mother-in-law was legitimate, because she served on his firm’s board and was a key decision-maker. The mother-in-law, Germaine “Suzy” Tomlinson, died at age 74 last September—just 32 months after the policy was issued.
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Endocyte, Purdue develop prostate cancer treatment device

July 13, 2009
 IBJ Staff
Purdue University researcher Philip Low, also the chief science officer for West Lafayette-based Endocyte Inc., has developed a prostate cancer “homing device” to help anti-cancer agents specifically target prostate cancer tumors.

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Conseco reinsurance deal swaps profits for cashRestricted Content

July 13, 2009
 IBJ Staff
Carmel-based Conseco Inc., still a bit strapped for cash, brought in a reinsurance company to shoulder some of the risk of its life insurance policies. Minnesota-based Wilton Reassurance Co. will pay $57.5 million to Conseco as a ceding commission to co-insure and administer 104,000 policies held by Conseco subsidiaries.
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BREAKING: FDA approves Lilly blood-thinner prasugrel

July 10, 2009
J.K. Wall
Eli Lilly and Co. finally won approval today from U.S. regulators to sell prasugrel, its highly anticipated blood thinner, according to Bloomberg News.
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Indianapolis benefits firms merge

July 8, 2009
J.K. Wall
Two Indianapolis benefits consulting firms have finalized their merger, the companies announced this morning. Terms of the deal between Benefit Associates Inc. and Benefit Consultants Inc., in the works since March, were not disclosed.
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Lilly cancer drug OK'd for new use

July 6, 2009
J.K. Wall
Eli Lilly and Co.'s top rising-star drug has been approved by U.S. regulators for a new use, an event that could boost sales of the medication. Alimta, a lung cancer drug, was approved as a maintenance therapy for non-small cell lung cancer for certain patients, Lilly announced today.
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Lilly kicks lobbying into high gearRestricted Content

July 6, 2009
 IBJ Staff
Once again, Indianapolis-based Eli Lilly and Co. is running in the lead pack in dollars spent to bend ears on Capitol Hill. And that was even before the health care reform debate got rolling.
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Cummins sues insurers over $381M in flood claimsRestricted Content

June 29, 2009
Peter Schnitzler
Cummins Inc. is battling its insurers in court, saying they're refusing to pay most of the company's $381 million in claims stemming from the flood that immersed its southern Indiana facilities a year ago.
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Peterson has passion for health care and new Lilly positionRestricted Content

June 29, 2009
J.K. Wall
A new communications post at Eli Lilly gives former mayor Bart Peterson an opportunity to meld his experiences in the public and private sectors.
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A.J. Gallagher & Co. strikes again, hires two more benefits brokersRestricted Content

June 29, 2009
 IBJ Staff
National acquisition-and-merger rage among benefits firms continues as Gallagher swallows groups in Noblesville and Louisville. Gallagher's Carmel office grows its client portfolio to 300.
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Government-run insurance plan draws mixed reviews from employersRestricted Content

June 22, 2009
J.K. Wall
Businesses all want to see reform of the health care system, but they diverge on how much the U.S. government's entrance into the insurance market would help or hurt them.
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Profs trying to revolutionize drug discovery processRestricted Content

June 22, 2009
 IBJ Staff
Two chemistry professors at IUPUI are laboring to create the McDonald's of research laboratories—a model that's low-cost and can spread around the world.
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Report says Indiana health care is over-specializedRestricted Content

June 1, 2009
Hoosiers see too many specialty physicians and are driving up health care costs as they do, according to a recent study by the Indiana University Center for Health Policy.
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Led by educators instead of investment specialists, state teachers fund fell into $67M holeRestricted Content

May 25, 2009
J.K. Wall
The people overseeing the Indiana State Teachers Association Insurance Trust had no background in investments or insurance, likely leaving them ill-equipped to grasp the ever-larger amounts of complicated investments the trust was buying.
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Insurers not attracting young peopleRestricted Content

May 25, 2009

Two-thirds of college-age Americans say health insurance is as important as salary when looking at jobs. Yet just as many have made no plans to obtain health insurance once they graduate from school this month.

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Simple invention targets blanket problem for surgical patientsRestricted Content

May 25, 2009
Chris O'Malley
In a state steeped in advanced research that spawns biomedical companies by the dozen, Apricity LLC is preposterously low-tech, given that its latest product is nothing more than a warm blanket.
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Wishard squeezes in more patientsRestricted Content

May 18, 2009
Occupancy at Wishard Hospital was 98 percent before the recession and is still that high, and more people have been coming as inpatients and as mental health patients, forcing the hospital to come up with creative ways to handle the load.
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Clarian and IU Med School hiring 1,500 docs for massive Indiana Clinic; strategy may cut out insurersRestricted Content

May 18, 2009
J.K. Wall
Clarian Health and the Indiana University School of Medicine want to turn 1,500 or more doctors into employees under a new nonprofit group called the Indiana Clinic.
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Prices salty and getting saltier at Indiana nursing homesRestricted Content

May 11, 2009
The cost of nursing home care in Indianapolis is rising faster than in the rest of the country, according to an annual survey of long-term-care costs by Virginia-based Genworth Financial.
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  1. The deductible is entirely paid by the POWER account. No one ever has to contribute more than $25/month into the POWER account and it is often less. The only cost not paid out of the POWER account is the ER copay ($8-25) for non-emergent use of the ER. And under HIP 2.0, if a member calls the toll-free, 24 hour nurse line, and the nurse tells them to go to the ER, the copay is waived. It's also waived if the member is admitted to the hospital. Honestly, although it is certainly not "free" - I think Indiana has created a decent plan for the currently uninsured. Also consider that if a member obtains preventive care, she can lower her monthly contribution for the next year. Non-profits may pay up to 75% of the contribution on behalf of the member, and the member's employer may pay up to 50% of the contribution.

  2. I wonder if the governor could multi-task and talk to CMS about helping Indiana get our state based exchange going so Hoosiers don't lose subsidy if the court decision holds. One option I've seen is for states to contract with healthcare.gov. Or maybe Indiana isn't really interested in healthcare insurance coverage for Hoosiers.

  3. So, how much did either of YOU contribute? HGH Thank you Mr. Ozdemir for your investments in this city and your contribution to the arts.

  4. So heres brilliant planning for you...build a $30 M sports complex with tax dollars, yet send all the hotel tax revenue to Carmel and Fishers. Westfield will unlikely never see a payback but the hotel "centers" of Carmel and Fishers will get rich. Lousy strategy Andy Cook!

  5. AlanB, this is how it works...A corporate welfare queen makes a tiny contribution to the arts and gets tons of positive media from outlets like the IBJ. In turn, they are more easily to get their 10s of millions of dollars of corporate welfare (ironically from the same people who are against welfare for humans).

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