Health Care

Community tries to keep up with diverse patient base: Hospital's new system improves cultural understandingRestricted Content

July 21, 2008
Katie Maurer
It takes years of research for an anthropologist to understand another culture, but doctors and nurses don't have that much time. With the growing diversity of people receiving health care in the United States, a patient's cultural background is often ignored or misunderstood by care givers. That can make for a less-than-positive hospital stay or doctor visit or, in rare cases, a catastrophic medical mistake. To avoid any such pitfalls, Community Health Network has implemented Culture Vision, an Internet-based program...
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Accountants predicting even more physician hookups: Katz Sapper, Heaton and Eadie join forces to keep up with fast-changing health care, benefits landscapeRestricted Content

July 21, 2008
J.K. Wall
Everybody's doing it. So Heaton and Eadie and Katz, Sapper & Miller decided to get together, too. Katz Sapper announced last week that it will acquire Heaton and Eadie because both Indianapolis-based accounting firms expect their main health care clients-physicians-to link up more and more with one another and with hospitals in the next five years. They want the heft and experience to win the right to handle finance and consulting on more of those transactions. Katz Sapper gets Heaton...
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New president shakes up nursing home group: Three quarters of staff leaves within months of arrivalRestricted Content

July 21, 2008
J.K. Wall
Steve Smith has shaken up the Indiana Health Care Association so much, the group representing Indiana's for-profit nursing homes is hardly recognizable to those who knew it before. And the way Smith tells it, he's just getting started.
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Commentary: Indianapolis deserves safer waterRestricted Content

July 14, 2008
Brian Williams
A recent Associated Press study of 62 major waterproviders across the country, including Indianapolis, found that nearly all their water had pharmaceutical product or indicators of pharmaceutical product in their water supply. P h a r m a c e u t i c a l products included antibiotics, anti-convulsants, mood stabilizers and sex hormones. The same AP study investigated watersheds and aquifers, large numbers of which were found to contain pharmaceuticals and other contaminants. Another national study of 139...
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Major moves to keep more patients on home turf: Hospital hires two ortho surgeons, changes nameRestricted Content

July 7, 2008
J.K. Wall
Nearly three-quarters of orthopedics patients in Shelby County have gone to an Indianapolis hospital to receive care. Now, Major Hospital in Shelbyville wants to keep more of those patients at home. By next June, the hospital will build a $7 million orthopedics center that will house two orthopedic surgeons. They will begin building their practices in Shelbyville next month. The play for orthopedics patients throws Major into a pitched battle among Indianapolis-area hospitals. Surging numbers of patients need new hips...
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IU program aims to turn lab rats into leaders: Business training is tailor-made for scientistsRestricted Content

July 7, 2008
J.K. Wall
Andrea Walker is a chemist with management aspirations. But instead of signing up for a traditional MBA program, the team manager at Indianapolis-based AIT Laboratories will enroll this year in a slimmed-down business program that focuses on the life sciences. The program, called the Kelley Executive Certificate in the Business of Life Sciences, is a new creation of Indiana University's Kelley School of Business. The program will conduct most of its classes online over a one-year period. The courses will...
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ECONOMIC ANALYSIS Mike Hicks: What it takes to make our health care system healthyRestricted Content

June 30, 2008
The U.S. health care policy debate has been strangely quiet the past few months. But the underlying problems grow ever more serious. Here's some background. First, health care costs are rising rapidly. A huge amount of the increase stems from greater demand for the most costly services. These services include advanced end-of-life care, much more extensive neonatal care, and high-end elective surgery. Higher use of these services represents perhaps the largest single contributor to overall health care costs. Second, we...
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Community dips toe into social networking: Hospital encourages patients to create blogsRestricted Content

June 30, 2008
J.K. Wall
Facebook and MySpace have harnessed the Internet to revolutionize how Americans keep in touch. Could providers of health care do the same? Indianapolis-based Community Health Network is trying to find out. It has opened its Web site to allow its patients to create their own MySpace-like pages to keep their family and friends informed about their treatment or about their new baby. Community's Web site also hosts discussion forums for various groups of patients, such as new moms, cancer patients,...
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Biotech database gives G&S high hopes: Firm sees more demand for grant-award researchRestricted Content

June 23, 2008
Scott Olson
By conducting market research for some of the largest pharmaceutical companies in the world, locally based G&S Research Inc. has grown into a $10 million firm. But founders have even higher expectations for their G&S Discovery division, which was formed two years ago. Its flagship product, Navigrant, provides a database of government grant awards for national biomedical research. The total market worldwide for life sciences research is estimated at $45 billion. Navigrant has compiled information on 450,000 awards from 60...
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Butler's pharmacy addition just what the doctor ordered: New $14M building will help college meet increasing demand for graduatesRestricted Content

June 23, 2008
Scott Olson
Mary Andritz, dean of Butler University's College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, bursts into laughter when asked how long her department's been short on space. "I've only been here for two years, but I think it's been for some considerable amount of time," she guessed. "Probably for 10 years." Lilly Endowment Inc., however, is filling the prescription in the form of a grant to fund a 40,000-square-foot addition under construction and scheduled to open by the fall 2009 semester. The...
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Community Health CEO Corley preparing for 'something different'Restricted Content

June 16, 2008
J.K. Wall
This month, 65-year-old Bill Corley gave his 18 months' notice that he will be retiring as CEO of Community Health Network, the third-largest hospital network based in Indianapolis. Perhaps Community's board of directors needed so much time to replace a man who has held his post so long-nearly 25 years. When Corley arrived in 1984, Community consisted of just one hospital on Indianapolis' east side. Today, it has five.
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VOICES FROM THE INDUSTRY: Remember the consumer in 'consumer-driven' plansRestricted Content

June 9, 2008
Bryan K.
While many businesses have made the phrase "consumerdirected health care" a standard part of benefits conversations, too many have failed to do the one thing that will make this approach successful: treat employees like consumers. Instead, employers have "communicat ed" this new benefit trend the same old way, with jargon-laced handouts, uninformative brochures and dry presentations. No wonder all employees aren't embracing consumer-directed health care. Researchers wouldn't be surprised by employees' slow adoption. Studies show that employees typically are more...
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Officials turn up call for 2-year degrees: State putting emphasis on higher education optionsRestricted Content

June 9, 2008
Tracy Donhardt
State and local leaders are turning up the amp on the importance of higher education, but they're also trying to tune students into the message that being college-educated doesn't have to mean spending four years at a university. In recent weeks, both Indianapolis Mayor Greg Ballard and Indiana Gov. Mitch Daniels have loudly proclaimed the state's need for more workers with twoyear degrees. While government officials have long said the state needs a more educated work force to attract business,...
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IPIC's BioWorksU virtual effort wins acclaim:Restricted Content

June 9, 2008
Scott Olson
A new Web site developed locally and designed to attract youngsters to careers in the life sciences sector now shares something in common with the wildly popular Club Penguin site. The Indianapolis Private Industry Council, with assistance from locally based Creative Street Media Group, created BioWorksU.com. And while more educational and likely more appealing to a larger age group than Club Penguin, the two were among recent Webby Awards finalists. Called the "Oscars of the Internet" by The New York...
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Commentary: HealthNet casts a wide oneRestricted Content

June 9, 2008
Chris Katterjohn
Indianapolis is becoming a much more international city. Consider some of the facts: Central Indiana's Latino population is now 100,000, fifth-fastest-growing in the United States; one in five scientists at Eli Lilly is Chinese; and 2,000 Burmese immigrants live here. These tidbits and mounds of other information about immigration in our community can be found in the International Center's coffee-table book, "New Faces at the Crossroads: The World in Central Indiana." The book also contains the stories and beautiful photographs...
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Local mental health centers caught in funding limbo: Federal effort to shift costs to states on hold, but not-for-profits' budgets for next year must be completed nowRestricted Content

June 9, 2008
Jennifer Whitson
At Indianapolis-based Adult and Child Mental Health Center Inc., Executive Director Bob Dunbar has developed a contingency plan as he works on the agency's $25 million budget for next year. He has two versions of a spending plan for the center, which provides mental health services for 4,200 children and adults a year. One includes moderate cuts tied to state funding changes, and the other deals with massive cuts pushed by the federal government. In the worst-case scenario, as much...
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Benicorp cleanup praised: Customers, employees ease through liquidationRestricted Content

June 2, 2008
J.K. Wall
When cash ran dry last summer at Indianapolis-based Benicorp Insurance Co., it could have created a major mess. But 10 months later, Indiana insurance regulators have kept all of Benicorp's customers covered by health insurance and given its employees a soft landing as they make the transition to new jobs. The last of a backlog of claims has been paid off. "No family in Indiana will have an uncovered claim," said Jim Atterholt, the Indiana commissioner of insurance. "That's a...
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Construction behemoth Skanska sees potential in Indy: U.S. division of Swedish-based company sets sights on health care, education, pharmaceutical building sectorsRestricted Content

May 26, 2008
Scott Olson
New Jersey-based Skanska USA Building Inc., a division of the $23 billion Swedish construction powerhouse Skanska AB, arrived in Indianapolis in April. Named last year as the top green contractor in the nation by Engineering News-Record magazine, Skanska USA is recognized in particular for its projects in the health care, higher education and pharmaceutical sectors. Its largest project, however, is the $998 million Meadowlands football stadium under construction in New Jersey. Locally, Terry Parrott, 50, is in charge of operations....
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Electronic record system results from frustration: Doctor, partner hawking technology they developedRestricted Content

May 26, 2008
J.K. Wall
For Dr. Tim Story, frustration was the mother of invention. The Carmel internist didn't like the cost or complexity of the electronic medical record systems he had seen. So he created his own. And now he's trying to sell it to other doctors. "I wanted an EMR that I could use, that I could understand," said Story, 55, who also chairs the largest group of physicians at Clarian North Medical Center. Story is by no means alone. Hundreds of doctors...
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Builders relying on medical projects: Amid general slowdown, health care sector busyRestricted Content

May 26, 2008
Tracy Donhardt
There's no shortage of research pointing to the growth in the health care industry. For example, health care expenditures will account for nearly a quarter of the gross domestic product by 2020. Consumers are increasing the number of times they visit the doctor, and the increase is even greater for baby boomers. The number of medical procedures being performed on an outpatient basis rises yearly. And jobs in the industry will grow 20 percent by 2016. To meet those demands,...
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Clarian blazes trail with transplants, but some question its zealRestricted Content

May 19, 2008
J.K. Wall
Clarian Health this decade has transformed its transplant program into one of the busiest in the country. Its team of surgeons takes calls around the clock if a viable organ becomes available. They will hop on a charter plane to check out an organ other doctors don't want.
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Hospitals are mixed bag for rural economiesRestricted Content

May 12, 2008
J.K. Wall
Around Indiana, hospitals continue to grow and add workers, increasing their role as an economic driver to the state's economy. But health care reformers say hospital growth has a double edge, as higher health care costs dampen growth prospects for other Indiana employers and their workers.
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Sommer Barnard merger pumps up attorney pay: Arrival of Cincy firm may lift starting salaries citywideRestricted Content

May 12, 2008
Scott Olson
This month's merger of the law firm Sommer Barnard PC into Cincinnatibased Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP likely will cause salaries for starting lawyers to escalate citywide. That's because, starting June 1, Taft plans to pay its first-year associates here $107,500-more than the $100,000 firstyear associates currently make at the highest-paying Indianapolis firms. If history is any indication, the topthree Indianapolis firms of Ice Miller LLP, Baker & Daniels LLP and Barnes & Thornburg LLP, and likely a few others,...
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NOTIONS: Political promises no panacea for health careRestricted Content

May 12, 2008
Bruce Hetrick
A while back, I had lunch with my friend John. As is our wont, we talked about politics, religion, our families, joys, frustrations. When the subject turned to work, John told me he's trying a new approach to fund raising and "friend-raising" for his small not-for-profit cancer agency. He's cutting out the big, time-consuming special event and simply inviting people in for a one-hour introduction to medically under-served cancer patients and how his organization helps. I told him I'd like...
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EDITORIAL: Leadership has its rewards: Health info exchange is exhibit ARestricted Content

May 5, 2008
Leadership has its rewards Health info exchange is exhibit A Being the best isn't everything, but it goes a long way when you're trying to attract money and expertise. That's why it's significant that the Indiana Health Information Exchange is taking its show on the road. As IBJ reporter J.K. Wall reported last week, those who oversee the platform for sharing patient records and test results electronically are preparing to make it available in other states. Hospitals and physicians in...
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