Health Care

People V Pounds: Ten local law firms vie to shed weight in friendly contest to promote wellnessRestricted Content

April 9, 2007
Scott Olson
Ten local law firms vie to shed weight in friendly contest to promote wellness Ten city firms indeed are vying to see whose members can shed the most inches from their waistlines within 10 weeks. The impetus for the "friendly" competition, which ends April 9, is modeled after Gov. Mitch Daniels' INShape Indiana program challenging Hoosiers to lose 10 pounds in 10 weeks. Because participating firms range in size from behemoth Ice Miller LLP to boutique Schuckit & Associates PC,...
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Wellness gains full-time presence: Hospitals try to bulk up health promotion at employers' officesRestricted Content

April 9, 2007
J.K. Wall
Wellness is good for business. At least that's what Community Health Network and other Indianapolisarea hospitals are finding as they ramp up the wellness programs they offer onsite to area employers. Community has grown its health promotion division an average of 30 percent in each of the last three years. And this year, it had two corporate clients ask to have wellness staff at their offices daily. Community parks a wellness coordinator five days a week at Celadon Group Inc.,...
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WellPoint draws ire for pushing generics: Pfizer asks docs to resist cheaper statinsRestricted Content

April 9, 2007
J.K. Wall
Indianapolis-based WellPoint Inc. is in a tussle with the nation's largest drug maker over the nation's top-selling drug. New York-based Pfizer Inc., facing the loss of billions in sales of its Lipitor cholesterol-fighting drug, sent letters last month to doctors, encouraging them to protest the attempts of health benefits firms to switch patients to generic cholesterol drugs. The letter, which says the change is being pushed "for cost reasons alone," reached doctors several days after Well-Point expanded a promotion to...
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EYE ON THE PIE: Whom will the state subsidize next?Restricted Content

April 2, 2007
Morton Marcus
Last week, I was walking on the Statehouse grounds and I saw some folks with large green pins on their lapels. "What do those stand for?" I asked. "Small businesses need Electronic Gaming Devices" one wearer told me. "That's for bars," I commented. The reply I got was not friendly. In the newspapers and on TV during the same week, there were features about horse breeders "needing" more state subsidies from slot machines at racetracks to "keep the industry alive."...
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Consumers drive away from HMOs: Despite declines, most plans in Indiana still have healthy reserves and profitsRestricted Content

March 26, 2007
J.K. Wall
Most central Indiana HMOs lost customers again in 2006, with consumerdriven health care plans inflicting the latest cut. Eight out of 10 major health maintenance organizations lost members, some for a third straight year. The declines ranged from 4 percent to 48 percent, according to their annual reports filed with the Indiana Department of Insurance. Most HMOs are in no danger of going out of business. Many posted increased profit in 2006, and most have healthy cash reserves. But HMOs...
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Surgeon helping pioneer efforts to regrow knee cartilageRestricted Content

March 26, 2007
J.K. Wall
When Dr. Jack Farr II saw his grandfather's knees become bowed out, then saw his father get a knee replacement, he knew he was next. So he spent his career trying to develop new techniques to replace--and now even regrow--the cartilage around knees. His labors are part of an international effort to develop alternatives to joint replacements.
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St. Francis CEO says Beech Grove move inevitableRestricted Content

March 19, 2007
J.K. Wall
Robert J. Brody, president and CEO of St. Francis Hospital & Health Centers, announced March 8 that St. Francis would shutter its inpatient hospital in Beech Grove and expand its south-side hospital by 2010. In an interview with IBJ, Brody laid out the ills that beset hospitals across the country.
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Commentary Noblesville gets traction under mayor:Restricted Content

March 19, 2007
Chris Katterjohn
When it comes to the battle of the 'burbs-at least those north of Indianapolis-Carmel seems to get all the glory. Not that it's undeserved, considering the progress and growth that have taken place under Mayor Jim Brainard. But lest you haven't noticed, Carmel's rival to the northeast-Noblesville-has fired up its afterburners in the last few years and is making major strides on the development front. Some of the credit should go to that city's first-term mayor, John Ditslear, who was...
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ECONOMIC ANALYSIS: Ideas needed for fixing health care financingRestricted Content

March 19, 2007
Patrick Barkey
It's been 15 years since third-party presidential candidate Ross Perot briefly captured the nation's attention with his crisp, witty promises to "look under the hood" to fix the problems in Washington. Since that time, some problems have gotten worse, some have gotten better. But in this era of political polarization and legislative gridlock, the idea of a new face coming to town to actually fix some of the problems we face today is as appealing as ever. What would such...
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FUNNY BUSINESS: Indiana's rural counties fall short of 'progressive'

March 19, 2007
Mike Redmond
I notice that my home county, LaGrange, did not make Progressive Farmer magazine's 2007 list of Top 10 Rural Counties in America. Then again, "progressive" is not a word that leaps to mind for a county that is about 40-percent Amish. Actually, none of Indiana's 92 counties made the Top 10. According to the magazine, the best rural places to live in America are (in reverse order): 10. Polk County, N.C.; 9. Amador County, Calif.; 8. Garfield County, Okla.; 7....
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NOTIONS: How to save lives, money, and still win re-electionRestricted Content

March 19, 2007
Bruce Hetrick
As a hearing-impaired, diabetic, migraine-suffering cancer survivor, father of a cancer survivor and widower of a cancer victim, I've followed my share of doctor's orders. So I've taken two of Monroe's tenaciousness pills, and I'm calling (well, writing) you in the morning. Since my late wife the non-smoker was diagnosed with a smoker's cancer, I've shared our sad story to educate government officials and citizens about the dangers of secondhand smoke. But let's skip the emotions this time, abandon impatience...
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Rivals tangle over impact of new hospitals: Health care providers disagree on how head-to-head competition will affect costsRestricted Content

March 19, 2007
Tracy Donhardt
Once joined at the hip, the two main health care providers in Tippecanoe County-Arnett Health System and Greater Lafayette Health Services-have become fierce rivals. Each is building a new hospital and will compete to provide services for the 154,000 county residents, and tens of thousands more in surrounding counties. Lafayette-based Arnett, a multi-specialty medical practice, has 140 doctors at a dozen area locations, plus eight facilities in other parts of the state. Greater Lafayette Health Services, part of Mishawaka-based Sisters...
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Physician assistants want OK to prescribe drugs: Bill would make Indiana last state to allow itRestricted Content

March 19, 2007
J.K. Wall
Indiana could see a wave of new physician assistants working here if lawmakers allow the medical technicians to prescribe medicine. So say the proponents of House Bill 1241, now being debated in the Indiana Senate. They claim Indiana, as the only state yet to grant the prescribing prerogative, forces doctors to hire fewer physician assistants and so loses health care workers to other states. That's a particularly important issue in rural and some urban areas, where doctors are scarce. Because...
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BEHIND THE NEWS: WellPoint succession breeds unease on Wall StreetRestricted Content

March 12, 2007
This isn't the Well-Point Inc. way. The last two times the Indianapolisbased health insurer appointed a CEO-when Ben Lytle took the job in 1989 and Larry Glasscock succeeded him in 1999-there was no drama. The board had publicly, and painstakingly, groomed the new leader. WellPoint did nothing remotely similar this time around. As CIBC World Markets analyst Carl McDonald pointedly observed in a research note, "There's clearly a gap in succession planning when a company of Well-Point's size has to...
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Software firm finally making name for itself: Fusion quietly becomes giant in local tech industryRestricted Content

March 5, 2007
Scott Olson
Doug Brown might not know how to name a company, but he sure knows how to grow one. CEO Brown, 46, co-founded Fusion Alliance Inc. in 1994 along with Tim Shaw, who is no longer active in the firm. The company has since blossomed into the Indianapolis-area's's largest software developer, with 196 staff and contract software engineers and programmers. Much of the growth coincides with the decision in 2000 to rechristen the northwest-side company from its original and less glamorous...
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EYE ON THE PIE: What's wrong with property taxes?Restricted Content

March 5, 2007
Morton Marcus
So much is going on in the Indiana General Assembly that it makes my head spin, which makes me dizzy and unfit for driving safely on the roads. That, plus the recent heavy snows, has made me a hermit. To re-enter society, I called Dr. Werner von Fizzle, the only psychologist I know who provides at-home consultations. As he sat down, Dr. von F asked, "Do you have some tonic vater?" I nodded and rose to fill his request. "And,"...
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Doctor grows magazine with unusual strategy: Circulation hits 100,000 nationally and still climbingRestricted Content

March 5, 2007
Anthony Schoettle
A Carmel-based doctor turned publisher is celebrating his magazine's first anniversary by rolling out plans to take his publishing and health care businesses nationwide. Radius magazine is poised for rapid growth due to its "no fluff" content, according to its founder, Dev Brar, who founded Carmel-based Nightingale Home Healthcare in 1996. Both businesses are operating out of a new headquarters at 1036 S. Rangeline Road, and Brar is hoping the two will grow hand-in-hand. Brar is using Radius to market...
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NOTIONS Bruce Hetrick: A buck-a-pack increased tax for the health we lackRestricted Content

February 26, 2007
After our Valentine's Day wedding, my bride and I took a few days off for a brief New York City honeymoon. We walked nearly everywhere, used public transportation when we wanted to go farther and bought our food and drink in jam-packed, smoke-free restaurants and bars (the only kind there are in New York, thanks to a several-years-old, levelthe-playing-field, smoke-free workplace law). I liked being able to dine anywhere and everywhere with clean indoor air. I liked the exercise from...
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New NFIB boss knows politics: State chapter to devote more time to campaignsRestricted Content

February 26, 2007
Jennifer Whitson
Kevin Hughes cut his teeth in the political world. Now he's taking a bite out of small business, as the new state director for the National Federation of Independent Business. Hughes, 30, has never owned his own business, but he worked for six years at the Ohio State Legislature as a legislative aide and for the Senate Republicans there. He also worked on several campaigns. In 2004, Hughes took a job as the Midwest regional political director for NFIB in...
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ECONOMIC ANALYSIS: Markets pay a premium for the college-educatedRestricted Content

February 26, 2007
Patrick Barkey
Nothing erases the thrill of getting a raise from your employer faster than the news that someone else got a bigger one. We care about how much money our friends, neighbors and coworkers make-not always in a benevolent sense-even though there is usually little we can do about it. The trappings of material wealth are all around us, and it is almost impossible, it seems, not to get caught up in the game. But despair over disparities in income and...
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MICKEY MAURER Commentary: A plug for non-partisan policy makingRestricted Content

February 12, 2007
MICKEY MAURER Commentary A plug for non-partisan policy making In my final week as secretary of commerce, I appeared at a hearing before the State Budget Committee on behalf of the Indiana Economic Development Corp. The hearing was the first step in the reauthorization process for operating budget and incentive program funding for fiscal years 2008 and 2009. It was to be my final presentation at the Statehouse. In an effort to demonstrate that the Legislature was reaping a handsome...
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ECONOMIC ANALYSIS: Earmarking taxes in vogue, but is it good state policy?Restricted Content

February 12, 2007
Patrick Barkey
I was taught economics, and in particular, the subject of public finance, by a faculty dominated by old Kennedy Democrats. A lot of that teaching has rubbed off or has simply been forgotten. Much of it also could be dismissed as idealism, a sort of ivory-tower thinking not relevant to the real world. Yet as I scan and digest the various tax proposals now in front of the Indiana General Assembly, several of those old lessons keep coming to my...
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BRIAN WILLIAMS Commentary: Good legislation to promote good healthRestricted Content

February 12, 2007
BRIAN WILLIAMS Commentary Good legislation to promote good health The newly elected and re-elected men and women of the Indiana General Assembly will debate and vote on many issues of importance during the 2007 session. One legislative proposal upon which members of the General Assembly and governor should quickly reach consensus is the proposal put forth in House Bill 1160, authored by Rep. Craig Fry, D-Mishawaka, and Senate Bill 114, authored by Sen. Beverly Gard, R-Greenfield, that would change the...
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VOICES FROM THE INDUSTRY: A positive shift in health care: It's OK to say you're sorryRestricted Content

February 5, 2007
Laura N.
Last September, when tragic errors led to the deaths of three infants at Indianapolis' Methodist Hospital, the hospital did something that, just a few years ago, might have seemed unthinkable: It acknowledged the tragedy and admitted that mistakes were made. "We are all saddened by this news and our hearts are with this family and all the families who have been affected," a hospital spokesman told The Indianapolis Star. Added Methodist President and CEO Sam Odle, "Ultimately, the blame for...
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Providers have new rules to take on Medicaid fraud: Many companies required to educate employeesRestricted Content

February 5, 2007
Scott Olson
A federal law that took effect Jan. 1 requires hospitals and others serving the Medicaid population to teach their employees how to detect fraud and report it to the government. Medicaid is the joint federal-state program that provides health insurance coverage to the needy and is prone to abuse. In an effort to reduce abuse, the legislation requires companies that do at least $5 million annually in Medicaid business to educate all employees and officers on how to spot fraud....
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  1. Those of you yelling to deport them all should at least understand that the law allows minors (if not from a bordering country) to argue for asylum. If you don't like the law, you can petition Congress to change it. But you can't blindly scream that they all need to be deported now, unless you want your government to just decide which laws to follow and which to ignore.

  2. 52,000 children in a country with a population of nearly 300 million is decimal dust or a nano-amount of people that can be easily absorbed. In addition, the flow of children from central American countries is decreasing. BL - the country can easily absorb these children while at the same time trying to discourage more children from coming. There is tension between economic concerns and the values of Judeo-Christian believers. But, I cannot see how the economic argument can stand up against the values of the believers, which most people in this country espouse (but perhaps don't practice). The Governor, who is an alleged religious man and a family man, seems to favor the economic argument; I do not see how his position is tenable under the circumstances. Yes, this is a complicated situation made worse by politics but....these are helpless children without parents and many want to simply "ship" them back to who knows where. Where are our Hoosier hearts? I thought the term Hoosier was synonymous with hospitable.

  3. Illegal aliens. Not undocumented workers (too young anyway). I note that this article never uses the word illegal and calls them immigrants. Being married to a naturalized citizen, these people are criminals and need to be deported as soon as humanly possible. The border needs to be closed NOW.

  4. Send them back NOW.

  5. deport now

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