Health Care

Clarian nabs UAC building: Hospital network wins bid for former corporate headquartersRestricted Content

December 5, 2005
Tom Murphy
Clarian Health Partners is polishing a deal to buy the former Union Acceptance Corp. headquarters on North Shadeland Avenue, a move that plants a large footprint for the burgeoning hospital network squarely in a competitor's east-side back yard. Clarian made the winning bid for the 126,000-square-foot building at a Nov. 15 auction, but the sale had not closed as of Nov. 30, said Bob Getts of Colliers Turley Martin Tucker, which ran the auction. He referred all questions to Clarian....
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Health discount cards spark call for regulation: State insurance group leads registration pushRestricted Content

December 5, 2005
Tom Murphy
Some health care discount programs that can leave patients stranded with large medical bills have put Indiana insurers in the strange position of asking for more government regulation. The Indiana Association of Health Underwriters plans to lobby in the upcoming legislative session for a bill that requires companies offering health care discounts to register with the state. That would allow regulators to investigate complaints and pursue regulatory action if troubles arise with the discounts, said Shawn Gibbons, a board member...
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Prominent technology executive steps down: Wortman resigns from Mezzia after just one yearRestricted Content

December 5, 2005
Peter Schnitzler
Details are scant. But after only a year on the job, one of the city's best-known IT leaders is moving on. Mezzia Inc. CEO David Wortman has resigned. "It was just time for a change," Wortman said. "I was with the company for a year, accomplished a lot, and was ready for a change." Best known as the longtime CEO of locally based manufacturing softwaremaker Made2Manage Systems, Wortman, 54, led his former company through an initial public offering. But he...
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Health care: big problem for small business: Wyoming lawmaker's proposed legislation could end 10-year Senate impasse on controversial solutionRestricted Content

November 28, 2005
Matthew Kish
More than 45 million Americans lack health insurance. And more than half of them are employed or dependent on someone who works for a small business, according to the National Federation of Independent Business. It's a big problem-especially in Indiana. Between 2000 and 2004, 5.6 percent of Hoosier workers lost employer-provided health care, according to the Economic Policy Institute. That's a higher percentage than any state except Wisconsin. Legislation just introduced in Congress by Wyoming Sen. Michael Enzi, however, may...
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States crimp Zyprexa access: Medicaid restrictions cutting into sales of Lilly's top drugRestricted Content

November 28, 2005
Tom Murphy
Eli Lilly and Co.'s top seller Zyprexa, pummeled in recent quarters by concerns over side effects, now faces a growing challenge from some of its biggest customers: state Medicaid programs. Citing high costs, more than a half dozen states have moved Zyprexa and other pricey anti-psychotics off preferred drug lists or made it harder for doctors to prescribe them for patients on Medicaid, the state-federal program that provides health care coverage for the poor and disabled. Georgia, for instance, saved...
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Standard Life sale leads to lawsuit over price: Kentucky buyer claims $652,000 refund is owedRestricted Content

November 21, 2005
Tom Murphy
Standard Management Corp. last week disclosed a new round of financial challenges and was hit with a lawsuit by a Kentucky company that bought its Standard Life Insurance subsidiary earlier this year. Louisville-based Capital Assurance Corp. accuses Standard Management of breaching terms of the contract to sell Standard Life and seeks a $652,126 refund, according to the lawsuit filed Nov. 14 in federal court in Indianapolis. Standard claims it owes only $43,000 in what it deems a "purchase-price adjustment dispute,"...
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EYE ON THE PIE: Should we save ailing manufacturers?Restricted Content

November 21, 2005
Morton Marcus
Today, Delphi in Kokomo is the leading economic issue in Indiana. The resolution of its difficulties may foreshadow where we go as a state. Delphi is a major manufacturer of electronics for automobiles. As a former component of General Motors Corp., Delphi still depends on that struggling company for a large portion of its revenue. In addition, Delphi has pension and health care costs inherited from GM's relationship with the United Auto Workers. Despite the fact that Delphi has been...
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Being inventive to infinity: Entrepreneurial spirit still strong after 125 years of health careRestricted Content

November 14, 2005
Shari Held / Special to IBJ
Today, the entrepreneurial spirit of the Daughters, who are Roman Catholic, lives on. They have a rich legacy to celebrate as they approach the 125th anniversary of the founding of the hospital that was the forerunner of St. Vincent Hospital Indianapolis. "To do all that, these four Daughters of Charity had to pass the baton, the values and spirit along over many, many generations," said Dr. Malcolm Herring, a vascular surgeon at St. Vincent Hospital and physician liaison to mission...
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Health Care Crusade: Physicians push for universal health coverage in IndianaRestricted Content

November 7, 2005
Tom Murphy
ome heart muscle had already died by the time family members coaxed the 50-something uninsured man into visiting Bloomington Hospital a few weeks ago. The patient had suffered severe chest pains two days before his hospital visit but didn't seek treatment, said Dr. Rob Stone, an emergencyroom physician there. "It was clearly because he was afraid of the bill," Stone said. By the time he made it to the hospital, the man was suffering a second heart attack. Now he...
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Doctor group spreads its reach across state: American Health Network sees big growth in 2005Restricted Content

October 31, 2005
Tom Murphy
American Health Network started 2005 with no presence in the cancer-fighting field of oncology. Now the Indianapolis-based doctor network boasts the largest medical oncology practice in the state, said Dr. Ben Park, its president and CEO. Within the past several months, Park has watched his network add oncology practices with 32 locations across the state, 10 family physicians in Muncie, and a $4 million Fishers Medical Arts Building, built in partnership with Indianapolisbased OrthoIndy. He expects to see more growth....
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State revamps health coverage: New health savings accounts and high-deductible policies could help stem rising costsRestricted Content

October 31, 2005
Tom Murphy
Indiana state government will unveil a fresh approach to insurance coverage next year when it offers health savings accounts to its 33,000 employees and their dependents. The state wants employees to take more control of their health care and consequently harness spiraling costs, Personnel Director Debra Minott said. The high-deductible AnthemBy-Design plan it chose to accomplish that will be offered as one of five coverage options during an open enrollment that starts Oct. 31. "We really see a looming crisis...
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Health construction beat marches on in Hendricks: Population growth spurs health care developmentRestricted Content

October 31, 2005
Tom Murphy
A growing population is breeding more multimillion-dollar health care projects in Hendricks County. Danville-based Hendricks Regional Health will begin work next month on a $16 million medical office building more than a year after completing a $24.5 million hospital expansion, and St. Francis Hospital & Health Centers is staking its claim with a $4.7 million medical office under construction in Plainfield. Meanwhile, Clarian Health Partners plans to bulk up parts of the 76-bed hospital it opened just last year in...
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Medicaid presents crime of opportunity: Fraud investigators see steady stream of people ripping off the systemRestricted Content

October 31, 2005
Tom Murphy
Pictures may be worth a thousand words, but they could cost dentist Michael Bajza $200,000 and six months of home detention. The Griffith dentist pleaded guilty in federal court this month to one count of health care fraud. He admitted asking Medicaid for reimbursement of oral Xrays when he knew his employees had only taken photographs of patients' teeth. Bajza and Thomas Hoshour, a former operator of central Indiana detox centers who is scheduled for sentencing Nov. 4, are but...
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Somerset enjoying freedom: Firm grew under First Indiana, but independence brings control, president saysRestricted Content

October 31, 2005
Scott Olson
Leaders of Somerset CPAs PC are soaking in the single life, one year after they split from First Indiana Corp. Twenty-one Somerset partners bought the assets of the accounting firm from the locally based public company on Oct. 25, 2004, ending a four-year relationship in which bad timing contributed more to the breakup than bad karma. The corporation is the holding company of First Indiana Bank. At a time when the Sarbanes-Oxley Act mandates auditor independence, Somerset President Patrick Early,...
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One Call rings up regulatory ire: Carmel telecommmunications firm faces fines, legal action-and increased scrutiny from FCCRestricted Content

October 31, 2005
Chris O\'malley
The Federal Communications Commission is threatening to revoke the operating authority of Carmel telecommunications firm One Call Communications for allegedly failing to remit millions of dollars in federal fees. In its second action against the firm since 2002, the agency also proposes a $1.1 million fine against One Call and parent OCMC Inc. The FCC complaint quietly launched in August comes after allegations made last spring by state regulators. The state allegations involved so-called "modem hijacking" of dial-up computer users,...
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Emerging Tech, Johnson centers team up: Partnership links incubator's startups with entrepreneurship studentsRestricted Content

October 24, 2005
Scott Olson
Now as executive director of Indiana University's Johnson Center for Entrepreneurship & Innovation, he has high hopes for his latest effort to introduce students to the real world of business. The Johnson Center, based in Bloomington, opened an office earlier this month at the Indiana University Emerging Technologies Center in downtown Indianapolis. The space gives MBA students the opportunity to provide consulting services to the 22 startups at the incubator. Unlike BSU seniors in the "spine-sweating" course who present an...
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NOTIONS: Blessed by quality, cursed by accessRestricted Content

October 24, 2005
Bruce Hetrick
Hetrick last week won the Lawrence H. Einhorn, M.D. Award from the Little Red Door Cancer Agency. A cancer survivor himself, Hetrick was recognized, in part, for IBJ columns about people with cancer, especially his wife, Pam Klein, who died in March at 49. He also was honored for advocating anti-smoking legislation. Following are excerpts from his prepared acceptance remarks. I don't deserve this award. I don't wield a scalpel, administer chemotherapy, invent drugs, change bed pans, hold patients' hands,...
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Lee, Willis prosper outside limelight: Former WRTV co-anchors run growing public relations firmRestricted Content

October 17, 2005
Anthony Schoettle
News defined the careers of Clyde Lee and Diane Willis for a combined five decades. And it was the nation's biggest news event of the last decade-9/11-that served as an ominous backdrop for the duo's first entrepreneurial venture. "We incorporated in August 2001, and less than a month later, 9/11 hit, and we thought, 'Oh my,'" Lee recalled. But more than four years later, Lee/Willis Communications is still standing-and prospering. The fiscal swoon that followed 9/11 caused many companies to...
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State changes malpractice tact: Insurance department using more outside legal helpRestricted Content

October 17, 2005
Tom Murphy
The Indiana Department of Insurance has boosted the outside help it uses to defend its medical malpractice Patients' Compensation Fund after seeing a record payout this summer. A staff shortage, concern voiced by providers and a ruling that could lead to huge damage sums all spurred the move, said Amy Strati, who oversees the fund as the Insurance Department's chief counsel. "The provider community has clearly said to us, 'We want you using experienced [medical malpractice] attorneys on the complex...
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VOICES FROM THE INDUSTRY: Employers should prepare for Medicare D complianceRestricted Content

October 17, 2005
John W.
With less than three months until Medicare D takes effect, there is plenty for an employer to do to get ready. If you have done nothing yet, follow these steps. If you are well on your way to compliance, use these to check your progress. Step 1: Learn it Medicare D is the new prescription drug benefit available to Medicare-eligible individuals, effective Jan. 1, 2006. With few exceptions, your retirees and active employees who are Medicare-eligible may enroll in Medicare...
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Willingness to adapt keeps benefits firm growing: Key adjusts to ever-changing health insurance marketRestricted Content

October 17, 2005
Scott Olson
Larry Dust capitalized on a then-radical health insurance concept 25 years ago that thrust him to the forefront of the corporate movement to outsource employee benefits services. Much has changed in the world of health care since, but Dust and Key Benefit Administrators Inc. continue to redefine the way employers approach insurance. "The cheese has moved in this business," Dust said, "and if you don't believe it, you better get out." The 57-year-old Knox native entered the insurance industry after...
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VIEWPOINT: Unleash your employees' service potentialRestricted Content

October 17, 2005
Tim Mulherin
As anyone in the field of emergency management will tell you, the regrettably sluggish governmental response to the Hurricane Katrina natural and manmade disaster boils down to the argument over jurisdictions (a perennial challenge in the world of emergency management) and a gross lack of execution. As a result of the governmental infighting and dearth of critical decision-making in the early stages of this catastrophe, American citizens were victimized. People suffered, people died. In the analysis of the Hurricane Katrina...
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ECONOMIC ANALYSIS: Smaller communities face largest economic obstaclesRestricted Content

October 17, 2005
Patrick Barkey
The population statistics tell the story-we are a nation of cities. Nationwide in 2000, almost 80 percent of us lived in what the Census Bureau considered urban areas. Yet Indiana has more small cities, and more people who live in rural areas, than do many other states. In 2000, nearly 30 percent of us lived outside urban areas, compared with the national average of 21 percent. And of our 92 counties, 38 have fewer than 30,000 people, with 19 of...
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In a race for robotics: Crash doesn't quell Jones' hope of building new industryRestricted Content

October 17, 2005
Peter Schnitzler
One day in the not-so-distant future, robot drones will drive the military's supply vehicles through dangerous war zones. They'll pilot tractors across farm fields and steer plows as they scrape snowy highways. Automatic cars will even whisk you to and from work. High-tech entrepreneur Scott Jones, 44, believes with a zealot's fervor this all will happen. More than a gee-whiz observer, the man who helped invent voice mail hopes to establish a robotic vehicle business-and ultimately the robotic vehicle industry-in...
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Premiums continue to climb: Rate increases may dip, but not by very muchRestricted Content

October 17, 2005
Tracy Donhardtreporter
After four years of double-digit rate hikes, average health care insurance premiums rose less than 10 percent in 2005. And they're expected to rise less than 10 percent again in 2006, according to several national surveys. But excuse employers if they don't get excited about the trend. They are still faced with having to pay much higher prices or trimming benefits-or both. Health care insurance premiums this year increased 9.2 percent, a 2-percent drop in the average increase from the...
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  1. I am not by any means judging whether this is a good or bad project. It's pretty simple, the developers are not showing a hardship or need for this economic incentive. It is a vacant field, the easiest for development, and the developer already has the money to invest $26 million for construction. If they can afford that, they can afford to pay property taxes just like the rest of the residents do. As well, an average of $15/hour is an absolute joke in terms of economic development. Get in high paying jobs and maybe there's a different story. But that's the problem with this ask, it is speculative and users are just not known.

  2. Shouldn't this be a museum

  3. I don't have a problem with higher taxes, since it is obvious that our city is not adequately funded. And Ballard doesn't want to admit it, but he has increased taxes indirectly by 1) selling assets and spending the money, 2) letting now private entities increase user fees which were previously capped, 3) by spending reserves, and 4) by heavy dependence on TIFs. At the end, these are all indirect tax increases since someone will eventually have to pay for them. It's mathematics. You put property tax caps ("tax cut"), but you don't cut expenditures (justifiably so), so you increase taxes indirectly.

  4. Marijuana is the safest natural drug grown. Addiction is never physical. Marijuana health benefits are far more reaching then synthesized drugs. Abbott, Lilly, and the thousands of others create poisons and label them as medication. There is no current manufactured drug on the market that does not pose immediate and long term threat to the human anatomy. Certainly the potency of marijuana has increased by hybrids and growing techniques. However, Alcohol has been proven to destroy more families, relationships, cause more deaths and injuries in addition to the damage done to the body. Many confrontations such as domestic violence and other crimes can be attributed to alcohol. The criminal activities and injustices that surround marijuana exists because it is illegal in much of the world. If legalized throughout the world you would see a dramatic decrease in such activities and a savings to many countries for legal prosecutions, incarceration etc in regards to marijuana. It indeed can create wealth for the government by collecting taxes, creating jobs, etc.... I personally do not partake. I do hope it is legalized throughout the world.

  5. Build the resevoir. If built this will provide jobs and a reason to visit Anderson. The city needs to do something to differentiate itself from other cities in the area. Kudos to people with vision that are backing this project.

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