Indiana Office of Tourism Development

New state slogan clashes with city goal of cosmopolitan imageRestricted Content

February 28, 2014
Anthony Schoettle
The state tourism department’s new tag line, “Honest to Goodness Indiana,” is so folksy that some wonder whether there’s a disconnect between what it says about the state and how the city of Indianapolis is trying to distinguish itself.
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No foolin': New state tourism pitch is 'Honest to Goodness'

February 12, 2014
Anthony Schoettle
The new tourism slogan, which replaces "Restart your engines," is the hook for a widescale state rebranding campaign.
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Tourism makes up state’s sixth largest industry, study says

December 18, 2013
Jacie Shoaf, The Statehouse File
The industry maintains nearly 140,000 jobs and contributes $10 billion in revenue to Indiana businesses, according to a new report.
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Indiana tourism spending is fraction of nearby states'

July 27, 2013
Anthony Schoettle
As Indiana slashed its tourism budget, Michigan increased its widespread Pure Michigan ad campaign from $17 million to $27.4 million. Illinois, where budget problems have earned the state the nation’s worst credit rating—A3 by Moody’s Investors Service—spends more than twice as much as Michigan.
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State launches grant program aimed at tourism

March 22, 2012
Anthony Schoettle
Lt. Gov. Becky Skillman says the $400,000 initiative will help draw visitors and have a "lasting impact" on Indiana's towns and cities.
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State tourism cuts alter marketing methods

May 7, 2010
Scott Olson
In light of a shrinking budget, the state has dropped traditional advertising campaigns to promote tourism and is embracing social media outlets to promote Indiana's attractions.
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Lawmakers cut state tourism office's budget in halfRestricted Content

August 3, 2009
Scott Olson
Destinations throughout Indiana no longer can count on a state marketing campaign to help drive summer crowds. Lawmakers who passed a budget during the special session at the end of June sliced the state’s annual contribution to the Indiana Office of Tourism Management in half—from $4.8 million to $2.4 million.
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State tourism advertising poses tough questionRestricted Content

May 18, 2009
Mike Hicks
If Indiana is to be marketed as a region, government will be the one to do it.
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  1. In reality, Lilly is maintaining profit by cutting costs such as Indiana/US citizen IT workers by a significant amount with their Tata Indian consulting connection, increasing Indian H1B's at Lillys Indiana locations significantly and offshoring to India high paying Indiana jobs to cut costs and increase profit at the expense of U.S. workers.

  2. I think perhaps there is legal precedence here in that the laws were intended for family farms, not pig processing plants on a huge scale. There has to be a way to squash this judges judgment and overrule her dumb judgement. Perhaps she should be required to live in one of those neighbors houses for a month next to the farm to see how she likes it. She is there to protect the people, not the corporations.

  3. http://www.omafra.gov.on.ca/english/engineer/facts/03-111.htm Corporate farms are not farms, they are indeed factories on a huge scale. The amount of waste and unhealthy smells are environmentally unsafe. If they want to do this, they should be forced to buy a boundary around their farm at a premium price to the homeowners and landowners that have to eat, sleep, and live in a cesspool of pig smells. Imagine living in a house that smells like a restroom all the time. Does the state really believe they should take the side of these corporate farms and not protect Indiana citizens. Perhaps justifiable they should force all the management of the farms to live on the farm itself and not live probably far away from there. Would be interesting to investigate the housing locations of those working at and managing the corporate farms.

  4. downtown in the same area as O'malia's. 350 E New York. Not sure that another one could survive. I agree a Target is needed d'town. Downtown Philly even had a 3 story Kmart for its downtown residents.

  5. Indy-area residents... most of you have no idea how AMAZING Aurelio's is. South of Chicago was a cool pizza place... but it pales in comparison to the heavenly thin crust Aurelio's pizza. Their deep dish is pretty good too. My waistline is expanding just thinking about this!

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