Indiana Office of Tourism Development

Indiana tourism group sharpens mission

July 26, 2014
Anthony Schoettle
New director changes organization’s name, launches initiatives catering to businesses.
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New state slogan clashes with city goal of cosmopolitan imageRestricted Content

February 28, 2014
Anthony Schoettle
The state tourism department’s new tag line, “Honest to Goodness Indiana,” is so folksy that some wonder whether there’s a disconnect between what it says about the state and how the city of Indianapolis is trying to distinguish itself.
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No foolin': New state tourism pitch is 'Honest to Goodness'

February 12, 2014
Anthony Schoettle
The new tourism slogan, which replaces "Restart your engines," is the hook for a widescale state rebranding campaign.
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Tourism makes up state’s sixth largest industry, study says

December 18, 2013
Jacie Shoaf, The Statehouse File
The industry maintains nearly 140,000 jobs and contributes $10 billion in revenue to Indiana businesses, according to a new report.
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Indiana tourism spending is fraction of nearby states'

July 27, 2013
Anthony Schoettle
As Indiana slashed its tourism budget, Michigan increased its widespread Pure Michigan ad campaign from $17 million to $27.4 million. Illinois, where budget problems have earned the state the nation’s worst credit rating—A3 by Moody’s Investors Service—spends more than twice as much as Michigan.
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State launches grant program aimed at tourism

March 22, 2012
Anthony Schoettle
Lt. Gov. Becky Skillman says the $400,000 initiative will help draw visitors and have a "lasting impact" on Indiana's towns and cities.
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State tourism cuts alter marketing methods

May 7, 2010
Scott Olson
In light of a shrinking budget, the state has dropped traditional advertising campaigns to promote tourism and is embracing social media outlets to promote Indiana's attractions.
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Lawmakers cut state tourism office's budget in halfRestricted Content

August 3, 2009
Scott Olson
Destinations throughout Indiana no longer can count on a state marketing campaign to help drive summer crowds. Lawmakers who passed a budget during the special session at the end of June sliced the state’s annual contribution to the Indiana Office of Tourism Management in half—from $4.8 million to $2.4 million.
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State tourism advertising poses tough questionRestricted Content

May 18, 2009
Mike Hicks
If Indiana is to be marketed as a region, government will be the one to do it.
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  1. The $104K to CRC would go toward debts service on $486M of existing debt they already have from other things outside this project. Keystone buys the bonds for 3.8M from CRC, and CRC in turn pays for the parking and site work, and some time later CRC buys them back (with interest) from the projected annual property tax revenue from the entire TIF district (est. $415K / yr. from just this property, plus more from all the other property in the TIF district), which in theory would be about a 10-year term, give-or-take. CRC is basically betting on the future, that property values will increase, driving up the tax revenue to the limit of the annual increase cap on commercial property (I think that's 3%). It should be noted that Keystone can't print money (unlike the Federal Treasury) so commercial property tax can only come from consumers, in this case the apartment renters and consumers of the goods and services offered by the ground floor retailers, and employees in the form of lower non-mandatory compensation items, such as bonuses, benefits, 401K match, etc.

  2. $3B would hurt Lilly's bottom line if there were no insurance or Indemnity Agreement, but there is no way that large an award will be upheld on appeal. What's surprising is that the trial judge refused to reduce it. She must have thought there was evidence of a flagrant, unconscionable coverup and wanted to send a message.

  3. As a self-employed individual, I always saw outrageous price increases every year in a health insurance plan with preexisting condition costs -- something most employed groups never had to worry about. With spouse, I saw ALL Indiana "free market answer" plans' premiums raise 25%-45% each year.

  4. It's not who you chose to build it's how they build it. Architects and engineers decide how and what to use to build. builders just do the work. Architects & engineers still think the tarp over the escalators out at airport will hold for third time when it snows, ice storms.

  5. http://www.abcactionnews.com/news/duke-energy-customers-angry-about-money-for-nothing

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