Indiana Office of Tourism Development

Indiana tourism group sharpens mission

July 26, 2014
Anthony Schoettle
New director changes organization’s name, launches initiatives catering to businesses.
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New state slogan clashes with city goal of cosmopolitan imageRestricted Content

February 28, 2014
Anthony Schoettle
The state tourism department’s new tag line, “Honest to Goodness Indiana,” is so folksy that some wonder whether there’s a disconnect between what it says about the state and how the city of Indianapolis is trying to distinguish itself.
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No foolin': New state tourism pitch is 'Honest to Goodness'

February 12, 2014
Anthony Schoettle
The new tourism slogan, which replaces "Restart your engines," is the hook for a widescale state rebranding campaign.
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Tourism makes up state’s sixth largest industry, study says

December 18, 2013
Jacie Shoaf, The Statehouse File
The industry maintains nearly 140,000 jobs and contributes $10 billion in revenue to Indiana businesses, according to a new report.
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Indiana tourism spending is fraction of nearby states'

July 27, 2013
Anthony Schoettle
As Indiana slashed its tourism budget, Michigan increased its widespread Pure Michigan ad campaign from $17 million to $27.4 million. Illinois, where budget problems have earned the state the nation’s worst credit rating—A3 by Moody’s Investors Service—spends more than twice as much as Michigan.
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State launches grant program aimed at tourism

March 22, 2012
Anthony Schoettle
Lt. Gov. Becky Skillman says the $400,000 initiative will help draw visitors and have a "lasting impact" on Indiana's towns and cities.
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State tourism cuts alter marketing methods

May 7, 2010
Scott Olson
In light of a shrinking budget, the state has dropped traditional advertising campaigns to promote tourism and is embracing social media outlets to promote Indiana's attractions.
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Lawmakers cut state tourism office's budget in halfRestricted Content

August 3, 2009
Scott Olson
Destinations throughout Indiana no longer can count on a state marketing campaign to help drive summer crowds. Lawmakers who passed a budget during the special session at the end of June sliced the state’s annual contribution to the Indiana Office of Tourism Management in half—from $4.8 million to $2.4 million.
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State tourism advertising poses tough questionRestricted Content

May 18, 2009
Mike Hicks
If Indiana is to be marketed as a region, government will be the one to do it.
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  1. How can any company that has the cash and other assets be allowed to simply foreclose and not pay the debt? Simon, pay the debt and sell the property yourself. Don't just stiff the bank with the loan and require them to find a buyer.

  2. If you only knew....

  3. The proposal is structured in such a way that a private company (who has competitors in the marketplace) has struck a deal to get "financing" through utility ratepayers via IPL. Competitors to BlueIndy are at disadvantage now. The story isn't "how green can we be" but how creative "financing" through captive ratepayers benefits a company whose proposal should sink or float in the competitive marketplace without customer funding. If it was a great idea there would be financing available. IBJ needs to be doing a story on the utility ratemaking piece of this (which is pretty complicated) but instead it suggests that folks are whining about paying for being green.

  4. The facts contained in your post make your position so much more credible than those based on sheer emotion. Thanks for enlightening us.

  5. Please consider a couple of economic realities: First, retail is more consolidated now than it was when malls like this were built. There used to be many department stores. Now, in essence, there is one--Macy's. Right off, you've eliminated the need for multiple anchor stores in malls. And in-line retailers have consolidated or folded or have stopped building new stores because so much of their business is now online. The Limited, for example, Next, malls are closing all over the country, even some of the former gems are now derelict.Times change. And finally, as the income level of any particular area declines, so do the retail offerings. Sad, but true.

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