Insurance Claims

Baldwin & Lyons reports higher revenue, lower profit

February 3, 2011
Indianapolis-based insurer of car and truck fleets posts quarterly profit slightly lower than a year ago. Revenue, however, rose to $67.7 million, up from $60.8 million in 2009.
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Earthquake shakes Baldwin's first-quarter profit

April 29, 2010
J.K. Wall
The February earthquake in Chile sent first-quarter profit tumbling 90 percent at Indianapolis-based property and casualty insurer Baldwin & Lyons Inc.
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Q&A

April 28, 2010
J.K. Wall
Dr. Stanley Adkins is chief medical officer of Indianapolis-based AmeriVeriCR, a startup that uses software to review medical claims for errors. With health care reform and a new, larger set of diagnosis codes phasing in over the next few years, AmeriVeri is betting that demand for its service will increase.
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Tomisue Hilbert investigates mother's death, $15M insurance policy

April 17, 2010
Peter Schnitzler
The wife of Indianapolis businessman Steve Hilbert is working with a team of attorneys to determine whether her deceased mother’s estate can claim the benefit of a life insurance policy issued by Houston-based American General Life Insurance Co.
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Hilbert in-law's insurance fraud trial set for October

April 12, 2010
Peter Schnitzler
As IBJ reported last year, Houston-based American General Life Insurance Company is attempting to invalidate a $15 million policy it issued in January 2006 insuring the life of Germaine “Suzy” Tomlinson—Conseco Inc. co-founder Stephen Hilbert’s mother-in-law—who died Sept. 28, 2008, at age 74.
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Hilbert in-law's life insurance dispute takes odd turn

July 13, 2009
Peter Schnitzler
Local businessman J.B. Carlson contends the $15 million life insurance policy he took out on Stephen Hilbert’s mother-in-law was legitimate, because she served on his firm’s board and was a key decision-maker. The mother-in-law, Germaine “Suzy” Tomlinson, died at age 74 last September—just 32 months after the policy was issued.
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Cummins sues insurers over $381M in flood claimsRestricted Content

June 29, 2009
Peter Schnitzler
Cummins Inc. is battling its insurers in court, saying they're refusing to pay most of the company's $381 million in claims stemming from the flood that immersed its southern Indiana facilities a year ago.
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Let's set record straight on benefitsRestricted Content

March 2, 2009
The insurance industry and [Indiana] Chamber of Commerce are providing misleading and untruthful statements to employers and their insured members about assignment of benefits.
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New Indy firm will focus on insurance defense casesRestricted Content

February 16, 2009
Two partners at the Bingham McHale LLP law firm are taking five lawyers with them to form a firm that will concentrate on insurance defense work.
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Health care interests wary of state's cost-cutting idea for MedicaidRestricted Content

February 9, 2009
J.K. Wall
Indiana Medicaid officials want to take over management of all its patients' prescription drugs because they say it could save the state as much as $40 million a year.
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Docs, health insurers battle at StatehouseRestricted Content

February 2, 2009
Katie Maurer
Physicians and insurance companies have entered their fourth year of haggling over insurance payments, and each side is claiming to best represent patients.
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Hilbert fears mother-in-law victim of foul play

January 26, 2009
Peter Schnitzler
Indianapolis businessman Steve Hilbert fears foul play in the recent death of his mother-in-law—a suspicion fueled by a new federal lawsuit alleging a woman by the same name was caught up in a $15-million life insurance fraud scheme. Though he acknowledges having no hard evidence, Hilbert said he has asked law enforcement authorities to reopen their investigation into the Sept. 28 death of Germaine "Suzy" Tomlinson, 69, mother of his wife, Tomisue.
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  1. How much you wanna bet, that 70% of the jobs created there (after construction) are minimum wage? And Harvey is correct, the vast majority of residents in this project will drive to their jobs, and to think otherwise, is like Harvey says, a pipe dream. Someone working at a restaurant or retail store will not be able to afford living there. What ever happened to people who wanted to build buildings, paying for it themselves? Not a fan of these tax deals.

  2. Uh, no GeorgeP. The project is supposed to bring on 1,000 jobs and those people along with the people that will be living in the new residential will be driving to their jobs. The walkable stuff is a pipe dream. Besides, walkable is defined as having all daily necessities within 1/2 mile. That's not the case here. Never will be.

  3. Brad is on to something there. The merger of the Formula E and IndyCar Series would give IndyCar access to International markets and Formula E access the Indianapolis 500, not to mention some other events in the USA. Maybe after 2016 but before the new Dallara is rolled out for 2018. This give IndyCar two more seasons to run the DW12 and Formula E to get charged up, pun intended. Then shock the racing world, pun intended, but making the 101st Indianapolis 500 a stellar, groundbreaking event: The first all-electric Indy 500, and use that platform to promote the future of the sport.

  4. No, HarveyF, the exact opposite. Greater density and closeness to retail and everyday necessities reduces traffic. When one has to drive miles for necessities, all those cars are on the roads for many miles. When reasonable density is built, low rise in this case, in the middle of a thriving retail area, one has to drive far less, actually reducing the number of cars on the road.

  5. The Indy Star announced today the appointment of a new Beverage Reporter! So instead of insightful reports on Indy pro sports and Indiana college teams, you now get to read stories about the 432nd new brewery open or some obscure Hoosier winery winning a county fair blue ribbon. Yep, that's the coverage we Star readers crave. Not.

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