Insurance

EYE ON THE PIE: Hoosiers are not getting full truthRestricted Content

July 2, 2007
Morton Marcus
Goodnews serves up economic and business reports about Indiana. Recently, I read his draft press release: "Indiana's personal income rose to $211.1 billion in the first quarter of 2007. That is an increase of $8.2 billion, more than 4 percent in the past year." "Is that it?" I asked. "Those are the latest facts from the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis," he said. "Anything else would be putting a spin on the basic truth." "Goodie," I said, using his nickname,...
More

Home Helpers: Aging population fuels home care business Service offers household help for elderly, infirmRestricted Content

June 18, 2007
Ed Callahan
Service offers household help for elderly, infirm Julie Sullivan's "a-ha" moment came when she was trying to coordinate home care for her elderly grandfather in Huntington while she was in Indianapolis. Even though, as a supervisor at Visteon, she had significant control over her schedule, Sullivan said she couldn't visit as often as she needed. "I thought, 'My word, what does the rest of the world do?'" she said. So Sullivan set out to help, starting a local franchise of...
More

ECONOMIC ANALYSIS: Will state's job growth always trail nation's?Restricted Content

June 18, 2007
Patrick Barkey
You usually have to swallow your pride when it comes time to forecast the growth of the Indiana economy. That's because no matter what your heart says, your head tells you what the best forecast will be. That is the one that pulls up well short of growth in the rest of the country. There are a lot of talented people working hard around the state trying to change that. And if the full truth be told, most of our...
More

Long-term care a long-term problem for Conseco: Losses mount in spite of huge insurance marketRestricted Content

June 11, 2007
J.K. Wall
Conseco sells that coverage, called long-term-care insurance. But right now, it wishes it didn't. The Carmel-based company has been losing millions of dollars a month on long-term-care policies, as the costs of providing care have outstripped the premiums collected. Conseco also is facing lawsuits and an investigation by a congressional committee into whether it wrongly denied customers' claims under its long-term-care policies. The troubles have kept Conseco's stock price depressed, furthering speculation that the company might be acquired. "It's certainly...
More

EYE ON THE PIE: Saving shouldn't put you in jailRestricted Content

June 11, 2007
Morton Marcus
Here is a test for you. The state government sends you a check for $2.5 million. What do you do with the money? According to the Associated Press, Sabrina Walker received such a check from the state of Minnesota. She then "bought a $500,000 certificate of deposit, funded two retirement accounts, [and] bought a $500,000 Treasury bond." Prosecutors claim she also bought $5,500 in jewelry, and spent $3,817 at Best Buy and $2,000 on limousine services. This prudent woman is...
More

New WellPoint plan makes wellness push: Program lets members join fitness clubs-for freeRestricted Content

May 28, 2007
Scott Olson
Want to join a gym but don't feel like splurging for the membership? No problem, if your company is one of a handful to offer a new wellness product that lets employees exercise at no charge. Called InTune, the program from Indianapolis-based insurance giant WellPoint Inc. is loaded with an array of services not unlike existing wellness offerings. Online and in-person coaching, diet advisers and holistic practitioners are among the benefits, for instance. But it's the free gym membership that...
More

Classic Niche: Local insurer riding wave of classic-car enthusiasmRestricted Content

May 28, 2007
Jennifer Whitson
In 1993, Dan Yogodnik started a business with a friend that leased out exotic cars for special occasions. The biggest hurdle the partners encountered was lining up insurance for the cars. That experience spurred Yogodnik, who had been working in the banking industry, to start his own insurance firm. "If we had our own insurance agency, then we wouldn't have to chase all over the country [for the niche policies]," he said. What started out as a side business targeting...
More

VOICES FROM THE INDUSTRY: How variable annuities can ruin a good vacationRestricted Content

May 28, 2007
Mark E.
As I'm sitting on a sunny Mexican beach during vacation enjoying yet another all-inclusive beverage, all I can think about is how much I hate variable annuities. I despise them. Whether you are north or south of the Rio Grande, you should understand that variable annu ities, or VAs as they're called in the industry, are typically lousy investments for just about everyone. This vacation was almost ruined by my associate, who put in my stack of reading materials an...
More

Insurer stays on roll by hitting the brakes: Baldwin & Lyons profits more despite revenue dropRestricted Content

May 28, 2007
J.K. Wall
But that axiom doesn't seem to apply to Baldwin & Lyons Inc. The quiet trucking-fleet insurer headquartered in Indianapolis happily let its revenue slide last year 7 percent, ending a four-year run of rapid growth. Why? Because new competitors have aggressively entered Baldwin's traditional trucking market with lower prices. The industry's margins have been slashed by half or more. Most businesses would call that trend a threat. But not Baldwin. President Joe DeVito disdainfully calls these new competitors "naive capital,"...
More

Law lets small employers band together for insurance: Experts disagree on whether associations will take offRestricted Content

May 28, 2007
Scott Olson
The Healthy Indiana Plan, which enacts a system to bring affordable health insurance to low-income Hoosiers, is one of the most far-reaching pieces of legislation to arise from the General Assembly this spring. The noble cause could provide coverage to about 15 percent of the state's population. Yet it could affect the small-business community as much as the state's growing number of uninsured. House Bill 1678, introduced by State Rep. Charlie Brown, D-Gary, and signed by Gov. Mitch Daniels May...
More

Contamination reconsidered: Developers show more acceptance toward environmental trouble spots When property is scarce, mitigation becomes viableRestricted Content

May 21, 2007
Chris O\'malley
When property is scarce, mitigation becomes viable The plan to close Citizens Gas & Coke Utility's coke manufacturing plant this year has already brought a few inquires about its reuse potential. But perhaps the biggest impact of the foundry fuel-maker's demise will be stoking discussions over whether other environmentally scarred properties are ripe for redevelopment. Until recent years, many developers regarded any property with even a tinge of environmental contamination as if a parcel in Chernobyl. The coke plant "illustrates...
More

What's ailing Indiana's banks?: State-based bank stocks are trailing national peers as industry deals with tough periodRestricted Content

May 14, 2007
Cory Schouten
Indiana bank stocks have taken a beating on Wall Street over the past year, lagging behind larger peers as the entire industry rides out an unfavorable environment. Shares of Indiana's 16 publicly traded banks dropped an average of 3 percent from May 4, 2006, to May 4, 2007, according to research by Carmel-based banking consulting firm Renninger & Associates LLC. Meanwhile, the nationwide SNL Financial bank index was up 4.4 percent. During the same period, the Dow Jones industrial average...
More

Award-winning financial planner not ready for retirement: Cooke, sons gain notice for helping well-heeled clientsRestricted Content

May 14, 2007
Scott Olson
As veteran financial planner John Cooke rehashes the highlights of his venerable career, it's evident that nothing can top the experience of working with his two sons. Close behind, though, are the accolades he's picked up along the way, including several mentions in various publications as one of the nation's top advisers. The latest recognition comes from Barron's magazine, in which Cooke is the only money manager in Indianapolis to make its list of the nation's top 100 brokers. His...
More

CHRIS KATTERJOHN Commentary: A word to the generally assembledRestricted Content

May 14, 2007
Like everyone else who's interested in these sorts of things, I have my opinions about the recently completed 2007 session of the Indiana General Assembly. Considering how long it took lawmakers to get on track, they accomplished some reasonably important business when it got down to the wire. Aside from the all-important balanced budget, tops on my list is the 44-cent increase in the cigarette tax. It should've been higher, but this will do for a start. For all you...
More

ECONOMIC ANALYSIS: Employers hope to save by promoting healthy livingRestricted Content

May 14, 2007
Patrick Barkey
"Mandates are a form of love," a state legislator once said, explaining a vote that added requirements to privately funded health insurance programs statewide. And our governments evidently love all of us-businesses, individuals, and even other governments-very much. Our legislatures tell us the lowest wage we can pay our workers, the questions we can and cannot ask during job interviews, and how many gallons of water we use to flush our toilets. To the admittedly narrow-minded thinking of an economist,...
More

STATEHOUSE DISPATCH: Gambling quenched lawmakers' appetite for new revenueRestricted Content

May 7, 2007
Ed Feigenbaum
The 2007 session of the Indiana General Assembly is now history. Whatever else might have been involved in shaping its outcome, nothing was so determinative as the revelation in the closing days that property taxes-driven by the first application of trending, rising property values in general, the elimination of the inventory tax, and some old-fashioned political legerdemain on the part of some assessors in different regions of the state-were expected to rise an average of 24 percent for taxes payable...
More

Winning bidder plans mixed-use project: Plan for state-owned parcel would add new neighbors for Bourbon Street Distillery, Musicians' Repair & SalesRestricted Content

April 30, 2007
Cory Schouten
The winning bidder for a prime piece of state-owned land on the west side of downtown hopes to break ground later this year on a residential and retail complex. The project would replace a shabby parking lot on a triangle-shaped block that is now anchored by The Bourbon Street Distillery and Musicians' Repair & Sales. The U-shaped, 0.75-acre property at 340 N. Capitol Ave. touches Indiana Avenue, Capitol Avenue and Vermont Street. The development likely would include condos above a...
More

FAMILY BUSINESS: Warning: Inevitable conflicts ahead for siblingsRestricted Content

April 30, 2007
Eric Manterfield
If you have at least one child working with you in the family business, it is virtually inevitable that conflicts among your children will arise at your incapacity or death. You may have a "business child" and a "non-business child." So long as you are alive and well, you can resolve any conflicts between them. But what happens when you become incapacitated or die? Sibling rivalry can not only destroy what you have worked so hard to build, but it...
More

Wright Development LLC: Providing the missing piece Development company aims to recreate neighborhoodsRestricted Content

April 23, 2007
Marc D.
Driving around the Holy Cross area just east of Lockerbie, the CEO of Wright Development LLC points out several properties her company has bought and refurbished-starting with 1209 and 1210 E. Vermont St.-as well as the many rehabs in the works. "Our goal is to re-create neighborhoods and make them viable, thriving, desirable places to live," she said. "That's usually left to the city, the not-for-profits and the [community development corporations]. We feel like there's been a component missing." The...
More

ECONOMIC ANALYSIS: The Great Society meets fiscal realityRestricted Content

April 16, 2007
Patrick Barkey
Someone wise in matters of politics once said programs for the poor are poor programs. It remains true today-initiatives aimed at helping the most vulnerable in our society, be they privately or publicly funded, seem to be perpetually starved for funds. And so the genius of those who created the Social Security system-originally aimed at older Americans whose assets were devastated by the Great Depression in 1935-was to make the program available to all, regardless of income. In a few...
More

STATEHOUSE DISPATCH: Negotiating blitz to bring legislative session to closeRestricted Content

April 16, 2007
Ed Feigenbaum
For those who thought this had been a fairly boring session of the Indiana General Assembly to date, wake up from your deep slumber. Nap time is over. We've reached the point where the lowhanging fruit has been picked by lawmakers and passed on to the governor, and the heavy lifting remains. Lawmakers embark upon the conference committee stage of deliberations. To understand conference committee time, forget all your conceptions to date about the session and begin with a clean...
More

Competition drives hospital chief: Lennen labors to grow hospital, county to stay ahead of Indianapolis peersRestricted Content

April 16, 2007
J.K. Wall
Competitive. That's how Shelbyville community leaders describe Tony Lennen. Indeed. Any CEO of the city's Major Hospital needs to be. Shelby County residents can, in just 20 to 45 minutes, drive up Interstate 74 or Interstate 65 to any of Indianapolis' large hospitals, many of which boast massive marketing budgets and stables of specialists. But in nearly 14 years at the helm of Major Hospital, Lennen has found creative ways to boost profits, enhance technology, woo specialists and even-through aggressive...
More

Hospital accepts loss for improving heart attack care:Restricted Content

April 9, 2007
Tracy Donhardt
St. Francis Hospital officials have found that improving care and cutting costs to treat heart attack patients comes at an unexpected price. A new program cut the hospital's time to treat patients and reduced the size of the heart attack-saving $9,400 per admission. But reimbursement by insurance companies dropped $9,715, resulting in the hospital losing $315 per admission. "The pay for quality and pay for performance issue under the current reimbursement structure is not designed to reward quality of care,"...
More

Local international film fest growing by leaps and bounds: But still small potatoes compared with HeartlandRestricted Content

April 9, 2007
Jennifer Whitson
The screen comes alive with the tale of a woman trying to track down her on-thelam husband even as she deals with her imprisoned brother and a grown son addicted to porn. The next night features a violence-packed trilogy of films about warring Asian gangs. Toto, we're not at the Heartland Film Festival anymore. No, the 191 films set to be screened at the Indianapolis International Film Festival starting this month are grittier-helping it build a reputation for attracting a...
More

NOTIONS: In God We Trust; all others risk their civil libertiesRestricted Content

April 9, 2007
Bruce Hetrick
The other night, while my wife Cherí attended class, I ate out with a copy of NUVO to keep me company. In the "letters" section, an atheist complained about Indiana's new "In God We Trust" license plate. He said government shouldn't promote religion, especially via a plate that requires no additional contribution, as do other "specialty" plates. When I got home, I found an e-mail from a friend wondering why these plates are so popular and whether taxpayers should bear...
More
Page  << 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 >> pager
Sponsored by
ADVERTISEMENT

facebook - twitter on Facebook & Twitter

Follow on TwitterFollow IBJ on Facebook:
Follow on TwitterFollow IBJ's Tweets on these topics:
 
Subscribe to IBJ
  1. Those of you yelling to deport them all should at least understand that the law allows minors (if not from a bordering country) to argue for asylum. If you don't like the law, you can petition Congress to change it. But you can't blindly scream that they all need to be deported now, unless you want your government to just decide which laws to follow and which to ignore.

  2. 52,000 children in a country with a population of nearly 300 million is decimal dust or a nano-amount of people that can be easily absorbed. In addition, the flow of children from central American countries is decreasing. BL - the country can easily absorb these children while at the same time trying to discourage more children from coming. There is tension between economic concerns and the values of Judeo-Christian believers. But, I cannot see how the economic argument can stand up against the values of the believers, which most people in this country espouse (but perhaps don't practice). The Governor, who is an alleged religious man and a family man, seems to favor the economic argument; I do not see how his position is tenable under the circumstances. Yes, this is a complicated situation made worse by politics but....these are helpless children without parents and many want to simply "ship" them back to who knows where. Where are our Hoosier hearts? I thought the term Hoosier was synonymous with hospitable.

  3. Illegal aliens. Not undocumented workers (too young anyway). I note that this article never uses the word illegal and calls them immigrants. Being married to a naturalized citizen, these people are criminals and need to be deported as soon as humanly possible. The border needs to be closed NOW.

  4. Send them back NOW.

  5. deport now

ADVERTISEMENT