Insurance

Defining success: Those who've tasted it share their thoughts on just exactly what 'it' isRestricted Content

August 8, 2005
How do you define career success? We posed that question to a variety of high-profile women and men in the Indianapolis business community. While the responses did confirm some of our preconceived notions-such as that men would mention financial rewards more often than women-there are far more similarities than differences, regardless of gender or profession. Still, "Career success is defined differently by each individual," as Alex Slabosky, president and CEO of The Healthcare Group, so wisely put it; and as...
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Dose of OPPORTUNITY: Wellpoint, other health care insurers forge strategies to grab their share of Medicare drug-plan businessRestricted Content

August 8, 2005
Tom Murphy
Afresh market that could be worth billions of dollars lies just over the horizon for health insurers like Indianapolis-based WellPoint Inc. Medicare, the U.S. government program for the elderly and disabled, will add a prescription drug benefit starting Jan. 1, and it could spend as much as $60 billion next year on medicines for 30 million people, according to Bloomberg News. But before insurers can start cashing in on this potential, they must develop their drug plans, win over some...
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SPORTS: Lance Armstrong miracle started here...or did it?Restricted Content

August 1, 2005
Bill Benner
It is 10 a.m. on July 24 and, from several thousand miles and an ocean away, it is being reported that Lance Armstrong has, indeed, won his seventh consecutive-and last-Tour de France. I pick up the telephone and dial Dr. Lawrence Einhorn at his home here in Indianapolis. "What a way to go out," says the doctor, the pleasure obvious in his voice. "And it still gives me goose bumps." What a championship pairing: Lance Armstrong, cancer survivor. Lawrence Einhorn,...
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Baby doctors ready to bolt: Clarian North's new north-side med center to lure business from St. Vincent, CommunityRestricted Content

August 1, 2005
Tom Murphy
Storm clouds are gathering to the north as St. Vincent Health applies the last coat of polish to its $19 million Women's Hospital renovation. The Indianapolis hospital will lose an obstetrician-gynecology group that delivers as many as 1,440 babies a year shortly after it completes its expansion in September. The 10 doctors of Women's Health Alliance plan to move offices and shift 80 percent of their practice to a new competitor, Clarian North Medical Center, a $285 million project scheduled...
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Counties, cities welcome food/beverage tax: Suburbs see extra funds as way to balance budgetsRestricted Content

August 1, 2005
Scott Olson
Several suburban cities and counties that have approved new food and beverage taxes view the windfall as a panacea for their budget woes. Six of the seven counties surrounding Marion County, excluding Morgan, have OK'd the 1-percent surcharge to help fund a new stadium for the Indianapolis Colts and Indiana Convention Center expansion. Morgan County councilors turned down the measure at a June meeting. The legislation, approved during the past session, directs counties to contribute half the food and beverage...
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Manufacturers struggle with China's risk, opportunity: Currency valuation one of many competitive issuesRestricted Content

August 1, 2005
Peter Schnitzler
Eighteen months ago, 110 people worked for Swiss Plywood Co., a Tell City-based cabinet-maker in business since 1945. The average tenure was 17 years. Today, only 65 employees are left at the controls of Swiss Plywood's machines. Chairman Bill Borders blames China. "We've weathered storms over the years," Borders said. "But nothing approaching this." Manufacturers in Indiana and across the nation have long complained about what they call Chinese currency manipulation. It's one of a litany of grumbles about Chinese...
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EYE ON THE PIE: Brothers set example for today's execsRestricted Content

July 25, 2005
Morton Marcus
Most of us know the fabled heroes of Bean Town. They include the Adams cousins (John and Sam). Paul Revere. The Kennedy brothers (John, Robert and Edward). Ted Williams, Carl Yazstremski, Bobby Orr, Bob Cousey, Bill Russell, Larry Bird and Tom Brady. Yet Boston's most significant business heroes are not well-known today, at a time when their example could be most useful. Two brothers, Edward and Lincoln Filene, inherited their father's department store in 1890. They spent the rest of...
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Insurers look to make uncommon comeback: Pafco, Superior hope to leave rehabilitation this yearRestricted Content

July 25, 2005
Tom Murphy
Only the hum of central air-conditioning broke the silence when Doug Symons recently led a quick tour of the Indianapolis office where his Superior Insurance Group once employed about 180 people. Rows of gray cubicles sat empty. Boxes filled with old claims and underwriting files lined the aisles. "This," Symons said as he waved his arms around, "is what an empty office looks like waiting to be filled." Those bare cubicles could fill up with dozens of new employees and...
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Auto auction board hikes own pay: Adesa Inc. also sent executive packing with full-sized severanceRestricted Content

July 18, 2005
Chris O\'malley
Vehicle auction giant Adesa Inc., which already pays one of the richest sums to its directors of any local company, has jacked up its annual board retainer 50 percent. Meanwhile, the Carmel-based company also has disclosed details of a severance package it paid to Executive Vice President James P. Hallett worth more than $1.3 million, not including the value of his stock options. Both events were disclosed in documents filed recently with the Securities and Exchange Commission. The eight-person board...
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Firm plans to get personal with clients' home pages: Former gubernatorial candidate runs Web businessRestricted Content

July 18, 2005
Scott Olson
Developing an Internet home page that gives users more options for content than what behemoths such as America Online and Yahoo! offer through their syndicated selections has become the ambition of George Witwer. The 46-year-old Bluffton native, who once aspired to be Indiana governor, launched the northwest-side Humanizing Technologies in January 2000. With much of the product's research and development in the can, the venture is close to weaning itself from investors and, for the first time, could turn a...
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Court files grow thick against Guidant: Shareholders, patients, employees air their grievancesRestricted Content

July 18, 2005
Tom Murphy
"Attention, patients with Guidant heart defibrillators," the announcer's voice booms as the television commercial begins. Nearly 50,000 of the devices were recalled June 17, and people using one may be at risk, according to the ad, which has run in Tennessee, Kentucky and central Indiana so far. It ends by urging viewers to call the Becker Law Office in Louisville for a free consultation. That ad could spawn at least 10 wrongful-death lawsuits, according to Gregory Bubalo, a Louisville-based lawyer...
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Degree combines medicine, business: IU grads put in 5 years to earn combo MD/MBARestricted Content

July 11, 2005
Katie Maurer
Tell people you have your MD and they'll likely be impressed. Tell them you also have an MBA-well, now you're just showing off. For four recent Indiana University graduates, however, impressing others had nothing to do with their decision to pursue simultaneous medical and business degrees. It's all about making their way in the increasingly complicated field of health care, where being a good doctor is about more than having the highest grades in medical school. The four students received...
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Employers promoting fitness: To battle steep insurance costs, businesses help employees get healthierRestricted Content

July 11, 2005
Julie Goldsmith
Wearing a pedometer, Kelly Dircksen treads 2,000 or so steps a day at the office, racking up her highest counts in her treks to the photocopier. Her 2-1/2-mile daily goal entails after-work walks, as well. The 34-year-old quoting specialist said her company pays 50 percent of any fitness-related costs for her and her family, including a Weight Watchers program, running shoes for her kids, and the entry fee for her son's marathon. "I'm definitely healthier," said Dircksen, who celebrates incremental...
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New public auto-loan firm in works: White River to buy failed Union AcceptanceRestricted Content

July 11, 2005
Greg Andrews
A new public company is rising from the ashes of Union Acceptance Corp., the failed east-side car-financing company, and is preparing to raise $35 million through a stock offering. White River Capital Inc., which will operate from UAC's former headquarters on North Shadeland Avenue, has agreed to buy out UAC's shareholders for $3.1 million in stock and to buy Virginiabased auto lender Coastal Credit LLC for $50 million in cash. "It's a tough industry, a hypercompetitive industry," White River President...
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Conseco hopes to receive crucial upgrade: Ratings firm A.M. Best Co. may make decision soonRestricted Content

July 4, 2005
Tom Murphy
The holiday season may arrive a few months early for Conseco Inc. if its subsidiaries receive the ratings upgrade that has topped their wish lists since their parent emerged from bankruptcy. A.M. Best Co. plans to complete a Conseco review this summer, and it probably will deliver the gift of good news afterward, according to some analysts who cover the Carmel-based holding company. New Jersey-based Best currently rates the financial strength of Conseco's core subsidiaries at a B++ level, one...
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NOTIONS: Will you try to transform or get stuck with status quo?Restricted Content

July 4, 2005
Bruce Hetrick
It's 4 a.m. I'm supposed to be writing by now, knitting you a tale about transformation. But the notions have yet to coalesce. So I lie in bed, watching through my bay window as a storm rolls through, igniting the sky with flashes of light. It's 4:27 a.m. I awaken again and flip on the TV, the sound muted so as not to disturb my son's slumber in the next room. The channel I was watching last night now shows...
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Youth sports get break: New law could cut Worker's Comp premiums dramaticallyRestricted Content

June 27, 2005
Tom Murphy
State lawmakers scored a goal for youth sports this spring when they approved a bill that could save some clubs thousands of dollars in present or future insurance premiums. Starting July 1, not-for-profits that have employees and pay youth coaches part time under an independent contractor arrangement will not have to provide Worker's Compensation benefits for those coaches. State Sen. Murray Clark, R-Indianapolis, said he had travel teams or clubs in sports like soccer, volleyball or baseball in mind when...
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Cab drivers drive down complaints: Service may have improved after city toughened rulesRestricted Content

June 27, 2005
Chris O\'malley
But much of the evidence is anecdotal, as city officials said they do not have complete complaint records for the periods just before and after the City-County Council imposed tougher regulations in 2002. One key problem addressed by those reforms seems to have diminished-drivers taking passengers to the wrong address. The city received only two such complaints in the last 1-1/2 years, according to records kept by the City Controller's Office. That had been a commonly reported problem in the...
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BULLS & BEARS: Investors should run from variable annuity plan offersRestricted Content

June 27, 2005
Dave Gilreath
There are many ways to invest your money in the stock market and no shortage of convincing salespeople preaching the best way to do it. The "can't-beat'e m- s o - j o i n - 'e m " crowd thinks index funds are the way to go. Some think actively managed mutual funds are best, while others go for individual stocks. All the above ways have merit, pluses and minuses, and different levels of involvement from you, the investor....
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Clinic predicts Hamilton County will be fertile ground: Doctors relocate reproductive practice to growing areaRestricted Content

June 27, 2005
Scott Olson
Surgery centers and a heart hospital are among a host of health care facilities that have risen in burgeoning north-suburban Hamilton County in recent years. Now, a new fertility clinic could contribute to the population surge by helping couples conceive children. The 6,400-square-foot Follas Center for Reproductive Medicine opened late last month on East 146th Street in Noblesville in a collaboration between several Indianapolis reproductive medicine innovators. The center is a partnership between Dr. David McLaughlin, a local pioneer of...
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Global mission: destroy, conquer: New law good news for shredding firmRestricted Content

June 20, 2005
Anthony Schoettle
Indianapolis-based Global Shred Inc. plans to use a new federal rule that forces companies to destroy more documents as a springboard to expand into other states. The document-destruction provision of The Fair and Accurate Credit Transaction Act of 2003 went into effect June 1, requiring all businesses to shred, burn or pulverize credit and consumer reports. While many mom-and-pop shredding shops in the highly fragmented industry look to fortify their local position, Global Shred founder and owner David Kantor thinks...
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Precedent plans spec office: Building signals improvement in north-suburban marketRestricted Content

June 20, 2005
Tammy Lieber
The Precedent Cos. is preparing to build a 100,000-square-foot office building in its namesake office park near 96th Street and Keystone Avenue, several local real estate experts said, further evidence of the north-suburban market's recovery. The building would mark the first new speculative office construction in the park since the mid-1990s, just before Indianapolis-based Precedent sold the park's 19 buildings with 1.1 million square feet of office space to Philadelphia-based Berwind Property Group Inc. in 1998. That sale didn't include...
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Debate over health care development takes legal twist: Three county-imposed construction moratoriums face federal lawsuitsRestricted Content

June 20, 2005
Tom Murphy
Hospitals and developers recently filed lawsuits in U.S. District Court against three counties that enacted moratoriums to slow health care construction in their territory. The Sisters of St. Francis Health Services Inc. sued Morgan County in April, and some Kentucky-based companies filed complaints against Clark and Floyd counties June 13. County officials say they need to make sure their county-owned hospitals remain viable in the face of more development. They also argue that providers want to enter their turf and...
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Phone-system expert answers entrepreneurial call: Via savvy marketing, she turned her knowledge of telecommunications into a thriving consulting businessRestricted Content

June 13, 2005
Susan Raccoli
When Barb Grothe said goodbye to her paycheck and job security 19 years ago, she was just a little scared and wondered, "Now what do I do?" She had office space for her new telecommunications consulting company, Telecom Resources, and 15 years of experience, but no clients. So she went about making herself known: she wrote articles for magazines, newspapers and journals (including IBJ) and scheduled speaking engagements. Almost each venture produced new clients, and Grothe was on her way....
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Community banks struggle with regulatory demands: Sarbanes-Oxley, Banking Security Act prove costlyRestricted Content

June 13, 2005
Peter Schnitzler
Who can blame small community banks for feeling boxed in? "The world has changed," said Jerry Engle, president and CEO of Greenwoodbased First Bank. "I guess we'll have to get used to it." Far and away, it's the increasing cost of regulatory compliance that keeps community bankers tossing and turning at night. In recent months, the Independent Community Bankers of America, a small-bank advocacy group based in Washington, D.C., has stepped up its ongoing campaign against additional regulation by asking...
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  1. I am so impressed that the smoking ban FAILED in Kokomo! I might just move to your Awesome city!

  2. way to much breweries being built in indianapolis. its going to be saturated market, if not already. when is enough, enough??

  3. This house is a reminder of Hamilton County history. Its position near the interstate is significant to remember what Hamilton County was before the SUPERBROKERs, Navients, commercial parks, sprawling vinyl villages, and acres of concrete retail showed up. What's truly Wasteful is not reusing a structure that could still be useful. History isn't confined to parks and books.

  4. To compare Connor Prairie or the Zoo to a random old house is a big ridiculous. If it were any where near the level of significance there wouldn't be a major funding gap. Put a big billboard on I-69 funded by the tourism board for people to come visit this old house, and I doubt there would be any takers, since other than age there is no significance whatsoever. Clearly the tax payers of Fishers don't have a significant interest in this project, so PLEASE DON'T USE OUR VALUABLE MONEY. Government money is finite and needs to be utilized for the most efficient and productive purposes. This is far from that.

  5. I only tried it 2x and didn't think much of it both times. With the new apts plus a couple other of new developments on Guilford, I am surprised it didn't get more business. Plus you have a couple of subdivisions across the street from it. I hope Upland can keep it going. Good beer and food plus a neat environment and outdoor seating.

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