Junior Achievement

Appeals court rules on anonymous online comment case

February 21, 2012
Jennifer Nelson / The Indiana Lawyer
The Indiana Court of Appeals on Tuesday ordered a Marion County judge to reconsider whether The Indianapolis Star must identify an online user who posted an anonymous comment that now is part of a defamation lawsuit.
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PNC's Stitle to chair Central Indiana Business Hall of Fame eventRestricted Content

December 31, 2011
 IBJ Staff
The event honors men and women who epitomize success in the business world.
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Junior Achievement prevails in lawsuit brought by former executiveRestricted Content

October 8, 2011
 IBJ Staff
A former executive vice president claimed Junior Achievement had failed to remit payments to his retirement and health-savings accounts, a violation of the Employment Retirement Security Act.
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Junior Achievement back in black after financial woes

July 27, 2011
Kathleen McLaughlin
The not-for-profit announced Wednesday morning that it has eliminated nearly $2 million in debt from six different creditors and has launched a fundraising campaign.
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Junior Achievement says ex-CEO acted soloRestricted Content

March 5, 2011
Kathleen McLaughlin
Junior Achievement’s attorneys paint the not-for-profit's ex-CEO as something of a renegade to bolster their defense in an ongoing lawsuit by another former executive.
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JA inducting four into Business Hall of Fame

January 13, 2011
Ceremony at Indiana Roof Ballroom on Feb. 17 will honor Michael G. Browning, David R. Frick, Stephen Russell and the late Eli Lilly.
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After another loss, JA plans for recovery

August 13, 2010
Kathleen McLaughlin
The not-for-profit hangs its hopes on efforts including more aggressive fundraising after reporting a $389,000 deficit for its 2010 fiscal year. "It's been a rough spell," said CEO Jennifer Burk.
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JA working its way out of real estate troublesRestricted Content

June 19, 2010
Kathleen McLaughlin
If the debt refinancing is completed, Junior Achievement would be nothing more than a tenant at the Gene B. Glick Junior Achievement Education Center.
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Fate of $200,000 JA scholarship a mysteryRestricted Content

May 1, 2010
Kathleen McLaughlin
The turmoil that now engulfs Junior Achievement of Central Indiana likely was spawned by questions that arose in 2008 about the handling of a scholarship fund worth about $200,000.
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Retired Junior Achievement exec files defamation suit

April 2, 2010
Kathleen McLaughlin
Former Junior Achievement CEO Jeff Miller says Mayor Greg Ballard was about to hire him as a senior policy adviser, but comments by Central Indiana Community Foundation President Brian Payne and current CEO Jennifer Burk ruined the offer.
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Junior Achievement CEO awaits results of auditRestricted Content

March 27, 2010
Kathleen McLaughlin
Jennifer Burk, who took the helm in July, wishes she'd asked more questions when she was a board member.
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Ex-exec accuses JA of withholding retirement funds

March 19, 2010
Victor George filed suit in federal court, alleging Junior Achievement failed to properly remit money to his retirement and health-savings accounts.
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Contractors seek answers over Junior Achievement project

March 18, 2010
Kathleen McLaughlin
The Central Indiana Community Foundation has stopped payment on a $3 million grant to Junior Achievement because of accounting questions.
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New Junior Achievement chief hopes to reach more kidsRestricted Content

August 10, 2009
Kathleen McLaughlin
The new CEO of Junior Achievement of Central Indiana, Jennifer Burk, said she has ideas for reinvigorating the base of corporate supporters and reaching more students with entrepreneurship programs.

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Hands-on lab teaches students personal financeRestricted Content

January 19, 2009
Kathleen McLaughlin
When middle school students arrive at Junior Achievement's "Finance Park," they've been learning for weeks about financial institutions, taxes, and budgeting. They should be ready to take on a hypothetical life scenario, complete with assigned salary and number of children, and go to work on a budget.
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  1. President Obama has referred to the ACA as "Obamacare" any number of times; one thing it is not, if you don't qualify for a subsidy, is "affordable".

  2. One important correction, Indiana does not have an ag-gag law, it was soundly defeated, or at least changed. It was stripped of everything to do with undercover pictures and video on farms. There is NO WAY on earth that ag gag laws will survive a constitutional challenge. None. Period. Also, the reason they are trying to keep you out, isn't so we don't show the blatant abuse like slamming pigs heads into the ground, it's show we don't show you the legal stuf... the anal electroctions, the cutting off of genitals without anesthesia, the tail docking, the cutting off of beaks, the baby male chicks getting thrown alive into a grinder, the deplorable conditions, downed animals, animals sitting in their own excrement, the throat slitting, the bolt guns. It is all deplorable behavior that doesn't belong in a civilized society. The meat, dairy and egg industries are running scared right now, which is why they are trying to pass these ridiculous laws. What a losing battle.

  3. Eating there years ago the food was decent, nothing to write home about. Weird thing was Javier tried to pass off the story the way he ended up in Indy was he took a bus he thought was going to Minneapolis. This seems to be the same story from the founder of Acapulco Joe's. Stopped going as I never really did trust him after that or the quality of what being served.

  4. Indianapolis...the city of cricket, chains, crime and call centers!

  5. "In real life, a farmer wants his livestock as happy and health as possible. Such treatment give the best financial return." I have to disagree. What's in the farmer's best interest is to raise as many animals as possible as quickly as possible as cheaply as possible. There is a reason grass-fed beef is more expensive than corn-fed beef: it costs more to raise. Since consumers often want more food for lower prices, the incentive is for farmers to maximize their production while minimizing their costs. Obviously, having very sick or dead animals does not help the farmer, however, so there is a line somewhere. Where that line is drawn is the question.

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