Leveraged buyouts

Finish Line cash hoard could draw out suitorsRestricted Content

November 6, 2010
Greg Andrews
Citigroup Capital Markets retail analyst Kate McShane has Finish Line near the top of her list of potential leveraged-buyout candidates.
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Citizens says buying water, sewer systems won't harm bond ratingRestricted Content

March 13, 2010
Chris O'Malley
Citizens Energy Group's plan to buy the city's water and sewer systems will require the utility to raise $262 million in new bond debt and inherit $1.5 billion in debt. Yet Citizens executives maintain the financial load should not impair the bond ratings of its principal utilities, Citizens Gas and Citizens Thermal.
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Related-party loans pile up at Durham-owned finance firm

October 24, 2009
Greg Andrews
Indianapolis businessman Tim Durham has treated Ohio-based Fair Finance Co. almost like a personal bank since buying it seven years ago, and now he, his partners and related firms owe it more than $168 million, records show.
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Buyout firm lands $202M infusionRestricted Content

December 24, 2007
Peter Schnitzler
Locally based Hammond Kennedy Whitney & Co. closed on $202 million in new capital this month, doubling its size. Its resources have increased, but HKW's investment philosophy is unchanged. It continues to buy small and midsize specialty manufacturing companies, infuse them with cash and management expertise, then patiently wait for them to grow.
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  1. How can any company that has the cash and other assets be allowed to simply foreclose and not pay the debt? Simon, pay the debt and sell the property yourself. Don't just stiff the bank with the loan and require them to find a buyer.

  2. If you only knew....

  3. The proposal is structured in such a way that a private company (who has competitors in the marketplace) has struck a deal to get "financing" through utility ratepayers via IPL. Competitors to BlueIndy are at disadvantage now. The story isn't "how green can we be" but how creative "financing" through captive ratepayers benefits a company whose proposal should sink or float in the competitive marketplace without customer funding. If it was a great idea there would be financing available. IBJ needs to be doing a story on the utility ratemaking piece of this (which is pretty complicated) but instead it suggests that folks are whining about paying for being green.

  4. The facts contained in your post make your position so much more credible than those based on sheer emotion. Thanks for enlightening us.

  5. Please consider a couple of economic realities: First, retail is more consolidated now than it was when malls like this were built. There used to be many department stores. Now, in essence, there is one--Macy's. Right off, you've eliminated the need for multiple anchor stores in malls. And in-line retailers have consolidated or folded or have stopped building new stores because so much of their business is now online. The Limited, for example, Next, malls are closing all over the country, even some of the former gems are now derelict.Times change. And finally, as the income level of any particular area declines, so do the retail offerings. Sad, but true.

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