Life Science & Biotech

Twilight fund fades away: Meanwhile, six BioCrossroads-backed VCs are just getting startedRestricted Content

May 9, 2005
Peter Schnitzler
Its specialty is developing local life sciences startups. But its partners can't raise any more money. So the sun is setting on Twilight Venture Partners. Meanwhile, the six venture capital firms BioCrossroads staked with its $73 million Indiana Future Fund have just three local investments to show among them. Venture investments take time, the six IFF recipients argue. And their first duty is to earn the high rate of return the IFF's organizers demand. That means significant proof of concept...
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Rose-Hulman aims for education, not incubation: Michigan-based EDF Ventures takes lead of Indiana Future Fund-backed partnership REI VenturesRestricted Content

May 9, 2005
Peter Schnitzler
The name is unchanged, but under Jack Midgley education comes first at Rose-Hulman Ventures. Business incubation is a distant second. And speculation on high-tech startups is outside the university's core mission. "The function of Ventures is education, because the function of Rose-Hulman is the education of engineers," said Midgley, Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology's embattled president. "Ventures is not a separate entity. It's part of the undergraduate program at Rose-Hulman, like the math department or the mechanical engineering department." Named president...
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Forums seek out diamonds in rough: Future Fund events link VCs with entrepreneursRestricted Content

May 2, 2005
Scott Olson
With $15 million to plow into early-stage companies, Indianapolis-based Pearl Street Venture Funds is one of several venture capital firms searching for promising technologies to fortify with a cash infusion. In return, the investors hope to stumble upon the next Eli Lilly and Co., or at the very least, an enterprise that eventually becomes profitable and attractive enough for acquisition. The process of locating such diamonds in the rough, however, can be arduous and time-consuming. To that end, the Indiana...
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Sales, new spec space in the cards at Intech: Intech One and Two likely to fetch top dollar, draw national interest, investment broker saysRestricted Content

May 2, 2005
Tammy Lieber
Two years ago, Lauth Property Group Inc.'s Intech Park was arguably the most prominent sign of central Indiana's soft office market. The northwest-side park's largest buildings, Intech One and Two, had entire floors vacant and awaiting completion. Acterna LLC was pulling out of its 140,000-square-foot building, a retreat symbolic of the technology bust's effect on the larger suburban office market. Today, helped by a robust investment market and Intech's recent state designation as a certified technology park, Lauth hopes the...
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IU planning logistics center: University seeks funds for facility to provide services to TDL industryRestricted Content

May 2, 2005
Chris O\'malley
Indiana University officials say they're shopping for a site near the airport or in Plainfield for a laboratory to help grow the state's transportation-distribution-logistics industry-known as TDL. The IU Supply Chain Control Center would evaluate for companies the feasibility and cost benefits of new technologies that could be used to improve sourcing, production and product distribution. The service would be provided at no or little cost. But the center faces a logistics challenge of its own-a delivery of cash. IU...
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Experts see improving market: Higher occupancy rates, more construction projects mean good news for landlords, developersRestricted Content

April 25, 2005
IBJ: Is your sector of the construction or real estate industry better or worse off than a year ago and why? BURK: Overall, I think the Indianapolis office market is better off than it was a year ago. The occupancy rate for the 29-million-plus square feet of multitenant office properties in the market increased by about 2 percent last year, to 82.5 percent. There was positive net absorption of about 600,000 square feet, most of which occurred in the suburbs....
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Two Indiana startups chosen to compete nationally:Restricted Content

April 18, 2005
Tracy Donhardt
Two of the eight finalists that will participate in a national competition of bioscience startup companies at Purdue University are from Indiana. Omni Spray and QuadraSpec will compete in the third annual Purdue University Life Sciences Business Plan Competition against companies affiliated with several renowned universities, including Columbia University, Harvard University, Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Johns Hopkins University. The companies will present business plans for bringing their products to market and be judged by a panel of venture capitalists,...
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CHRIS KATTERJOHN Commentary: Be yourself-maximize your assetsRestricted Content

April 18, 2005
Be who you are. Conversely, don't try to be somebody you're not. Focus on what you do best, and you'll succeed. When we think of people who excel at anything ... Joshua Bell playing the violin, Reggie Miller shooting three-pointers, Dr. Lawrence Einhorn treating cancer ... we understand they have achieved their success by focusing on their God-given talents, developing them, and practicing, practicing, practicing. Communities are much the same, though the philosophy could be amended to read a more...
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Incubator lures biotech upstart: Fish vaccine biz hoping to land on canalRestricted Content

April 4, 2005
Peter Schnitzler
Hatching new businesses is getting to be routine for Indiana University. So it was easy for Richard Wagner to contemplate moving his biotech startup from Columbus, Ohio, into IU's 2-year-old business incubator on the Central Canal. "It's an excellent facility. Every time I go up, I'm more and more impressed with it," Wagner said. "They put a lot of thought into designing it to meet the needs of life science and biotechnology research." Wagner, who holds a doctorate in plant...
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Council launches new HR initiative: Target is small companies that have no administratorRestricted Content

March 28, 2005
Scott Olson
Small-business owners who need help wading through myriad human resources issues now have another source to consider-the Indianapolis Private Industry Council Inc. The 23-year-old IPIC, better known for overseeing the seven WorkOne career centers in Marion County, has leapt into the HR arena by partnering with a handful of professionals who have agreed to honor the agency's low-cost pledge. Sixty thousand people walk through the doors of the centers each year looking for work. But many of their potential employers-many...
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Million dollar baby: Hospital reaps benefits of caring for high-profile boy A public relations jackpotRestricted Content

March 28, 2005
Tom Murphy
The Afghan boy may have arrived last month at Riley Hospital for Children with heart trouble and a need for complicated surgery. But behind those soft, brown eyes and that adorable smile lies a 12-cylinder marketing engine. A sample of the 15-month-old's power: Qudrat's often-reported story created at least $1 million in free media for Riley, according to hospital officials. That's 10 times the amount Riley spends on print or broadcast advertising in a year. He could be responsible for...
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IP center at IUPUI gets off to quick start: Facility lands first grant, hopes to sell naming rightsRestricted Content

March 21, 2005
Scott Olson
Legal scholar Kenneth Crews is a man of many hats who toils at 12-hour workdays as the upstart Center for Intellectual Property and Innovation on the campus of IUPUI begins to gain momentum. The center, whose mission is to produce attorneys fluent in the burgeoning IP practice area, was launched in May under the auspices of the Indiana University School of Law in Indianapolis. The goal is to raise at least $1.5 million to jump-start a program that would grant...
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GERALD BEPKO Commentary: Chicago World's Fair is model for IndianaRestricted Content

March 14, 2005
Cities seem to progress in stages with moments of decline, growth, exceptional energy, and, at times, a sense of destiny. For many years, Indianapolis has been a city on the move, a little like Chicago in 1893 when it hosted a World's Fair. Chicago sought to shed its frontiertown image and establish itself as a city of global consequence. It beat out New York, St. Louis and Washington, D.C., for the right to host the fair. In hosting it, Chicago...
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Special Report: MURKY MISSION: Vague directive dilutes 21st Century Fund's high-tech impactRestricted Content

February 7, 2005
Peter Schnitzler
When directors of Indiana's 21st Century Research and Technology Fund convened in May 2003, they'd already doled out $70 million in state grants over three years to fund h i g h - t e c h innovation a n d w e r e preparing to u n l e a s h another $60 million. But you wouldn't know it after reading minutes from that meeting. They show a rollicking debate broke out over the 21st Century's Fund's...
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European firm plants local roots in patient technology: Company to start Indianapolis operation after testRestricted Content

February 7, 2005
Tom Murphy
A British company has picked Methodist Hospital and Indianapolis as the birthing ground for a new way to monitor patients using technology inspired by jet engines. Oxford BioSignals Ltd. hopes to roll out its BioSign technology by the end of this year, but the Rolls-Royce partner won't leave the city after testing ends. The company also plans to start business operations here, much to the delight of those nurturing the life sciences industry. BioSignals will begin testing its BioSign product...
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Roche CEO search continues with no end in sight: Sudden departure of Madaus last October opened up broad search for successorRestricted Content

January 31, 2005
Tom Murphy
Roche Diagnostics Corp. is still searching for a CEO to lead its North American headquarters in Indianapolis, and the company has cast a wide net. Roche is searching "internally, locally, nationally and internationally" for the right executive to replace Martin D. Madaus, spokeswoman Doyia Turner said. Madaus, 45, left in October to become president and CEO of Millipore Corp. in Massachusetts, Turner said. The search is going well, she said, but the company has no time frame for completing it....
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Indiana IPOs break out of recent slump: Kite Realty, Republic Airways, Adesa among 5 state firms to test public watersRestricted Content

January 24, 2005
Scott Olson
Hoosier-based companies registered five initial public offerings last year, a robust number considering not a single Indiana business went public in 2003. The uptick could signal the state's economy, as well as the nation's, is on the mend. Nationally, 233 companies raised $43 billion collectively to go public on the major U.S. stock exchanges in 2004, a 195-percent increase in the number of IPOs over 2003. And the performance could be even stronger this year, said Richard Peterson, a market...
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VIEWPOINT: We stand on the shoulders of black business giantsRestricted Content

January 24, 2005
Jesse L.
In a recent conversation with a family member regarding the lack of African-American businesses in the high technology, life sciences and larger manufacturing arenas, I began to wonder, "What are the barriers that prevent African-Americans from entering business? Are conditions worse now than in the past when we seemed to have greater representation in these areas?" Some will say it is the lack of access to capital. Some will point to the continued aura of racism and prejudice, while still...
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Outlook is good for entrepreneurs:Restricted Content

January 17, 2005
Doug Edge
Could 2005 be the tipping point for Indiana to become the center for entrepreneurship in the world? That is a pretty bold statement, considering Indiana's poor track record. As executive director for Entrepreneur's Alliance of Indiana, I talk with many entrepreneurs that are excited about the direction Indiana is headed. We have in place a strong educational component with several universities ded icated to research and development and the incubation of new ideas. Geographically we have always had an advantage,...
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Purdue, IU out to bolster their life sciences futures: Both universities invest millions in biomedical pursuits Grants help growth 'A new kind of engineer'Restricted Content

January 17, 2005
Brent Adams
Whenever Indiana and Purdue universities get together on the hardwood or the debate arena, the rivalry is intense. But as various public and private players around the state put on a full-court press for Indiana's life sciences future, the schools have teamed up like a dynamic backcourt duo. The Scientist, a biweekly publication delivered to 75,000 people worldwide, in November ranked Purdue No. 2 and Indiana No. 10 on a list of "Best Places to Work in Academia," based on...
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Plan for psychiatric hospital revisited: Daniels team wants review of Larue Carter replacementRestricted Content

January 17, 2005
Tom Murphy
A plan to build a new state psychiatric hospital near the IUPUI campus might wind up back on the drawing board. The new administration of Gov. Mitch Daniels wants to take a hard look at the freshly minted proposal to build a replacement for Larue D. Carter Memorial Hospital off of 16th Street on the near-north side. The hospital currently occupies part of an old Veterans Affairs complex on Cold Spring Road. Last month, the state unveiled a plan to...
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GERALD BEPKO Commentary: State should help insurance industry growRestricted Content

January 10, 2005
GERALD BEPKO Commentary State should help insurance industry grow Everyone seems to agree that state governments must facilitate job growth and wealth creation. As pioneers in publicprivate partnerships, Indiana's leaders have envisioned a future for Indiana that includes many partnership economi c - d eve l o p m e n t strategies. One reflection of this vision is the Central Indiana Corporate Partnership-led focus on key sectors, such as advanced manufacturing, logistics and life sciences. The priority associated with...
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CHRIS KATTERJOHN Commentary: Avoid Florida-like snags on stadiumRestricted Content

January 10, 2005
NAPLES, Fla.-As I entered the state of Florida yesterday, I remembered that just about a year ago I was at a meeting in South Miami where Florida Gov. Jeb Bush was holding court on economic development efforts. His pride and joy was a deal to bring the Scripps Research Institute to Palm Beach County on the state's east coast. I wrote a column about it in our Feb. 9, 2004, issue. Bush and his team had lured the highly regarded...
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  1. I am so impressed that the smoking ban FAILED in Kokomo! I might just move to your Awesome city!

  2. way to much breweries being built in indianapolis. its going to be saturated market, if not already. when is enough, enough??

  3. This house is a reminder of Hamilton County history. Its position near the interstate is significant to remember what Hamilton County was before the SUPERBROKERs, Navients, commercial parks, sprawling vinyl villages, and acres of concrete retail showed up. What's truly Wasteful is not reusing a structure that could still be useful. History isn't confined to parks and books.

  4. To compare Connor Prairie or the Zoo to a random old house is a big ridiculous. If it were any where near the level of significance there wouldn't be a major funding gap. Put a big billboard on I-69 funded by the tourism board for people to come visit this old house, and I doubt there would be any takers, since other than age there is no significance whatsoever. Clearly the tax payers of Fishers don't have a significant interest in this project, so PLEASE DON'T USE OUR VALUABLE MONEY. Government money is finite and needs to be utilized for the most efficient and productive purposes. This is far from that.

  5. I only tried it 2x and didn't think much of it both times. With the new apts plus a couple other of new developments on Guilford, I am surprised it didn't get more business. Plus you have a couple of subdivisions across the street from it. I hope Upland can keep it going. Good beer and food plus a neat environment and outdoor seating.

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