Low-Income Housing

Mass Ave project works toward April approval

March 2, 2010
Tom Harton
Trail Side on Mass Ave would include 69 one-bedroom apartments and about 23,000 square feet of ground-level retail space.
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Affordable-housing group goes on apartment-buying bingeRestricted Content

January 23, 2010
Cory Schouten
Partners in Housing Development seized on a weak real estate market to acquire three urban apartment communities in the last 18 months.
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Grocery, housing projects could rejuvenate stretch of 16th Street

October 10, 2009
Cory Schouten
A troubled low-income housing project has a new owner with plans to redevelop the complex to better connect with the Herron Morton Place neighborhood. Next door, Kroger has revived efforts to acquire land and plan a new supermarket to replace a cramped, old-format location.
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Transit, sustainable development likely to be themes in rescue of near-north neighborhoodRestricted Content

June 1, 2009
Chris O'Malley
Local leaders and, soon, a national team of experts, are quietly developing a strategy to revitalize Marion County's biggest concentration of brownfield sites and impoverished urban neighborhoods, centered at East 22nd Street and the Monon Trail.
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Developer wants to turn project into apartments, officesRestricted Content

May 25, 2009
Cory Schouten
A local developer is hoping to convert an unfinished eight-story luxury condo project downtown into a mostly affordable apartment building with its headquarters on the top floor.
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A new generation takes over Glick apartment empire

March 30, 2009
Cory Schouten
A new generation of company leadership is revving the Gene B. Glick Co. and building and buying apartment complexes again.
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IndyFringe leads effort to build artists' apartmentsRestricted Content

November 10, 2008
Kathleen McLaughlin
Indy Fringe executive director Pauline Moffat and Gary Reiter, a board member of the Indianapolis Theatre Fringe Festival Inc., want to build an affordable live-work complex near Massachusetts Avenue.
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  1. Apologies for the wall of text. I promise I had this nicely formatted in paragraphs in Notepad before pasting here.

  2. I believe that is incorrect Sir, the people's tax-dollars are NOT paying for the companies investment. Without the tax-break the company would be paying an ADDITIONAL $11.1 million in taxes ON TOP of their $22.5 Million investment (Building + IT), for a total of $33.6M or a 50% tax rate. Also, the article does not specify what the total taxes were BEFORE the break. Usually such a corporate tax-break is a 'discount' not a 100% wavier of tax obligations. For sake of example lets say the original taxes added up to $30M over 10 years. $12.5M, New Building $10.0M, IT infrastructure $30.0M, Total Taxes (Example Number) == $52.5M ININ's Cost - $1.8M /10 years, Tax Break (Building) - $0.75M /10 years, Tax Break (IT Infrastructure) - $8.6M /2 years, Tax Breaks (against Hiring Commitment: 430 new jobs /2 years) == 11.5M Possible tax breaks. ININ TOTAL COST: $41M Even if you assume a 100% break, change the '30.0M' to '11.5M' and you can see the Company will be paying a minimum of $22.5, out-of-pocket for their capital-investment - NOT the tax-payers. Also note, much of this money is being spent locally in Indiana and it is creating 430 jobs in your city. I admit I'm a little unclear which tax-breaks are allocated to exactly which expenses. Clearly this is all oversimplified but I think we have both made our points! :) Sorry for the long post.

  3. Clearly, there is a lack of a basic understanding of economics. It is not up to the company to decide what to pay its workers. If companies were able to decide how much to pay their workers then why wouldn't they pay everyone minimum wage? Why choose to pay $10 or $14 when they could pay $7? The answer is that companies DO NOT decide how much to pay workers. It is the market that dictates what a worker is worth and how much they should get paid. If Lowe's chooses to pay a call center worker $7 an hour it will not be able to hire anyone for the job, because all those people will work for someone else paying the market rate of $10-$14 an hour. This forces Lowes to pay its workers that much. Not because it wants to pay them that much out of the goodness of their heart, but because it has to pay them that much in order to stay competitive and attract good workers.

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  5. It is sad to see these races not have a full attendance. The Indy Car races are so much more exciting than Nascar. It seems to me the commenters here are still a little upset with Tony George from a move he made 20 years ago. It was his decision to make, not yours. He lost his position over it. But I believe the problem in all pro sports is the escalating price of admission. In todays economy, people have to pay much more for food and gas. The average fan cannot attend many events anymore. It's gotten priced out of most peoples budgets.

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