Manufacturing & Technology

Knauf plans state's first 'gold-certified' buildingRestricted Content

March 17, 2008
Chris O'Malley
in an uncommon move among Indiana manufacturers typically more preoccupied with foreign competition and deteriorating margins, Knauf Insulation is rebuilding its research and development facility, destroyed in a fire last year, to make it 30 percent more energy-efficient than a conventional office building of its size.
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Hoosier Heartland Highway pumps up hope on prairie: Expressway construction starting two years earlyRestricted Content

March 17, 2008
Chris O\'malley
LAFAYETTE-For years, they've driven on little more than paved-over wagon trails pioneers carved into the hills nestling the Wabash River. Motorists on State Road 25 between Logansport and Lafayette have grown desperate for a replacement: the final, 33-mile western leg of the "Hoosier Heartland Highway." Today, the Hoosier Heartland expressway ends in Logansport-the western terminus of a newly improved, four-lane U.S. 24 that runs east, to Fort Wayne. But last month Gov. Mitch Daniels surprised highway proponents with word that...
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Proposals to loosen Indiana's wine distribution system failRestricted Content

March 17, 2008
Jonathan Hiskes
At IBJ press time, the General Assembly was set to close another session without significant change to the state's complex alcohol distribution system, ensuring another year of wrangling between wineries and wholesalers. A proposal to raise the direct shipping limit to 10,000 cases failed. So did a broader deregulation bill brought by a new Indiana wine drinker's group, VinSense.
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Students finding robotics irresistible: Competitions promote interest in technologyRestricted Content

March 10, 2008
Scott Olson
On the same day this month when high school boys' basketball teams compete to advance to the state finals, another event showcasing the talents of Indiana's youth should be just as climactic. Only this contest emphasizes academics over athletics. The three-day Boilermaker Regional at Purdue University that culminates March 15 will host roughly 40 high school robotics programs, including 26 schools from Indiana. Students will apply their engineering and computer programming skills to design and build task-performing machines. The winning...
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IU follows Purdue lead, overhauls business-development strategyRestricted Content

March 10, 2008
Peter Schnitzler
Indiana University President Michael McRobbie calls it "Innovate Indiana." His ambition is to corral all of IU's strengths under one new branded initiative to boost the Hoosier economy. Purdue University already has leveraged a similar strategy, promoted with "Go BusinessMakers!" billboards, to national acclaim.
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EYE ON THE PIE: Waiting for evidence of recessionRestricted Content

March 10, 2008
Morton Marcus
Save the date: March 27. That's when the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis will release the latest data on Indiana's economy. At that time, we'll get the first estimate of personal income for the last three months of 2007, plus revisions of previous quarters. If there is a recession, that's where we will see the first clear indications. If? Yes, it is still not clear if there is a recession because the data, our photos of economic performance, are not...
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Telamon on the rebound: Diversification puts Carmel technology firm back on fast track, prevents layoffsRestricted Content

March 10, 2008
Peter Schnitzler
In 2003, Carmel-based Telamon Corp. hit rock bottom. So, founder Albert Chen returned to his roots. Taiwanese native Chen, 63, had spent two decades building his firm to serve telecommunications giants. But when the dot-com bubble burst, the telecom industry tanked along with it. Telamon-then Indiana's largest minority-owned business-saw its annual revenue plummet $300 million, down from $456 million in 2001. Most managers would have chosen to shrink Telamon to reflect its new reality. But Chen doesn't do mass layoffs....
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VIEWPOINT: Suffering a slow death by technologyRestricted Content

March 3, 2008
Jon Ford
Somebody help me! I want to go back to the '80s! This technology stuff is killing me. A rotary phone and a busy signal, that's the ticket. Ma Bell: She's my gal. Simplicity. Doesn't that sound good? I used to think the advances in electron ic technology were a good thing. The early developments were excellent and, like most people, I rushed out to buy them. The iPod, now, that was a great advance. A complete Beethoven collection in a...
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Former Thomson exec attempts to revive Proscan TVs: U.S. subsidiary sells South Korean flatscreensRestricted Content

February 25, 2008
Peter Schnitzler
In the mid 1990s, Carmel's then-giant Thomson Consumer Electronics annually sold $300 million worth of high-end televisions under the name Proscan. But by the end of the decade, the company's French owners had abandoned Proscan in favor of a strategy emphasizing the betterknown RCA brand. Now a former Thomson executive based in Indianapolis is attempting to revive Proscan. Last year, Pat Deighan sold nearly $50 million worth of Proscan high-definition flatscreen LCD televisions in the United States. This year, he...
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Against odds, AlGalCo pursues 'Holy Grail' of power cellsRestricted Content

February 25, 2008
Sam Stall
A small West Lafayette technology startup has quietly unveiled a product that might, just might, change the world. At the TechAdvantage Conference and Expo in Anaheim, Calif., on Feb. 20, Kurt Koehler, CEO, co-founder (and, for the moment, sole employee) of AlGalCo LLC, showed off a pre-production hydrogen-powered emergency generator.
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Uphill battle ahead: State poses tough test for new enviro leaderRestricted Content

February 11, 2008
Chris O\'malley
By the time Jesse Kharbanda earned a Rhodes scholarship to study at Oxford, the University of Chicago student already knew he wanted to advocate environmental policies in the developing world, someday. Eight years later, some might say Kharbanda has landed in the developing world, all right-Indiana, insofar as it's considered the backwater of environmental stewardship. One might recall the state's 49thplace ranking in a 2007 review of "greenest" states by Forbes magazine. Only West Virginia-a national leader in illiteracy-scored worse....
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Law firms making green push: Environmental teams provide marketing boostRestricted Content

February 11, 2008
Scott Olson
The next generation of environmental law is coming to a firm near you. Many law firms have existing practices that counsel clients on the complexities of complying with air and water permits or cleaning up contaminated properties. But now that the corporate sector is embracing "green" initiatives quicker than Al Gore accumulates carbon credits, environmental law is becoming as sexy as, say, intellectual property. Two of the city's largest firms-Ice Miller LLP and Baker & Daniels LLP-recently unveiled so-called "green"...
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EYE ON THE PIE: Readers respond to Indiana stampRestricted Content

February 11, 2008
Morton Marcus
On Jan. 14, I wrote about the new Indiana stamp from the U.S. Postal Service. I objected to the selection of a farm tractor with a cityscape in the distance as being typical of Indiana and invited readers to comment. Below are a few typical remarks: From a reader in Tennessee who grew up in Kokomo: "As I read your column, I was torn between what you were saying and my warm fuzzy memories of my childhood. ... Indiana represents...
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Technology park could boost area's biomedical efforts: First phase of Purdue project, featuring accelerator building for up to 25 startups, should be finished this yearRestricted Content

February 4, 2008
Scott Olson
The park is expected to be a major amenity for the area's growing biomedical economic development efforts. Purdue Research Foundation paid $2.5 million in June to purchase a half-interest in 78 acres at AmeriPlex industrial park. The university ultimately anticipates filling it with as many as 75 businesses and 1,500 jobs. AmeriPlex owner Holladay Properties, a South Bend developer of industrial parks, owns the other half of the site. Dubbed Purdue Accelerator Park at AmeriPlex-Indianapolis, the project is intended to...
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VOICES FROM THE INDUSTRY: More businesses can benefit from a doctor in the houseRestricted Content

February 4, 2008
Christopher S.
Fifty years ago, a sick or injured worker in a manufacturing plant did not have to leave work to get care-the worker simply went to the plant clinic and saw the company doctor. Today, the idea of the company clinic is making a come back, but with a new emphasis on wellness and prevention. health recommendations and concerns. In some cases, these routine visits can lead to the discovery of potentially serious conditions that might have otherwise gone unnoticed and...
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Throttling up for big job cuts at Rolls-Royce?: Local impact of international job reductions isn't clearRestricted Content

February 4, 2008
Chris O\'malley
The more than 4,000 employees at the region's second-largest manufacturer are waiting to learn whether some will lose their jobs. Rolls-Royce Group PLC plans to cut up to 2,300 U.S. and European positions. The British aerospace company on Jan. 11 said it plans to slash its work force by almost 6 percent among managerial, professional and clerical ranks. It blames rising raw material costs and the declining value of the U.S. dollar. First-half 2007 profits of $600 million were roughly...
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STATEHOUSE DISPATCH: Legislators avoiding games as they tackle tax reformRestricted Content

January 28, 2008
Ed Feigenbaum
People outside the legislative process finally are understanding that there is no perfect solution to the property tax reform dilemma, that it is not a zero-sum game, that there will be winners and losers, and that this is not a Democrat vs. Republican issue. What they still do not realize is how hard legislators are working to accommodate the legitimate concerns of homeowners, governmental units and schools, businesses, and agricultural interests, and how difficult it is to assemble a package...
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City emerging as drug distribution hub: Medco Health Solutions deal latest boon to growing subsector in Indiana's life sciences development effortsRestricted Content

January 21, 2008
Peter Schnitzler
Thanks to a series of major economic development wins, Indianapolis is enjoying a pharmaceutical distribution business hot streak. Life sciences industry leaders hope to keep the sizzle burning in 2008 and beyond. "It's not something we're hoping we can do someday. It's something we're already doing now," said BioCrossroads CEO David Johnson. "We're simply trying to expand the footprint of what we're doing." Pharmaceutical logistics has become a big business. According to the Arlington, Va.-based Healthcare Distribution Management Association, U.S....
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Growing biomed firm rolls with the changes: Under string of owners, Seradyn develops niche producing immunoassaysRestricted Content

January 21, 2008
Scott Olson
Life sciences firm Seradyn Inc. on Georgetown Road has endured a revolving door of owners in the 30-some years since its inception. But what hasn't changed is its dedication to developing immunoassays for medical purposes. Immunoassays are chemical tests used to detect or quantify a specific substance-the analyte-in a blood or body fluid sample. Seradyn develops and manufactures assays that use antibodies to measure drug concentrations in the bloodstream. In the past 10 years, Seradyn has developed 15 such products...
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EYE ON THE PIE: Indiana being stamped with wrong imageRestricted Content

January 14, 2008
Morton Marcus
Blessed be our friends at the U.S. Postal Service. They do a great job of collecting and distributing the mail. They face strong competition from private carriers and from the Internet, but they continue to serve the public well. Then, too, USPS always looks for new ways to honor America and Americans through the issuance of new stamps. If a particular series catches on, they can make a pretty penny by selling stamps that are never used. That's why USPS...
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NY Times job helps ACS Sign gain attentionRestricted Content

January 14, 2008
Anthony Schoettle
ACS Sign System's unusual approach to sign-making--some are not strictly signs at all--has helped the company grow its revenue and expand its footprint beyond Indiana. In recent years, sales outside its home state have grown from 20 percent of total revenue to almost half.
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INVESTING: Look to battered sectors for bargain investmentsRestricted Content

December 31, 2007
Ken Skarbeck
This was a puzzling year for investors. It began with ample lowcost money available to borrowers and record-low volatility across markets. It will end with a credit crunch hobbling financial firms and a market punctuated by volatile spurts. And yet despite this significant shift in market character, the major averages will end the year with modest positive gains. The year began with a sort of benign complacency for investors, as stocks had been on a smooth upward trajectory since the...
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ECONOMIC ANALYSIS: Why state's job growth is better than neighbors'Restricted Content

December 24, 2007
Mike Hicks
For the past week or so, I have been flooded by phone calls from colleagues in Illinois and Michigan, chortling over a new marketing campaign launched by Hoosiers. The privately financed billboards and radio spots ask businesses and residents whether they are tired of high taxes and unresponsive government. If so, they are invited to "Come on IN" to Indiana. It's high-order fun this holiday season. Indiana sits as a small island of growth in the Midwest, and it is...
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Union push under way at 2 Indianapolis hotels: They would be first to unionize in central IndianaRestricted Content

December 24, 2007
Jennifer Whitson
Employees at two Indianapolis hotels have begun a push to unionize-a move that, if successful, would make the properties the only union hotels in central Indiana. Several workers at the downtown Westin and the Keystone Sheraton have met with representatives of New York-based Unite Here, a labor group that represents about 440,000 hospitality and textile employees nationwide. Both hotels are part of Bethesda, Md.-based Host Hotels & Resorts Inc.'s global portfolio. Backers said a union is needed to raise wages...
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Century-old manufacturer cleans up on dirty waterRestricted Content

December 17, 2007
Anthony Schoettle
One hundred and one years ago, Cole Stickle convinced the Langsenkamp family to help him start a company based on a technology few understood--turning water into steam power. Five generations later, the 15-employee operation continues to thrive.
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  1. Can your dog sign a marriage license or personally state that he wishes to join you in a legal union? If not then no, you cannot marry him. When you teach him to read, write, and speak a discernible language, then maybe you'll have a reasonable argument. Thanks for playing!

  2. Look no further than Mike Rowe, the former host of dirty jobs, who was also a classically trained singer.

  3. Current law states income taxes are paid to the county of residence not county of income source. The most likely scenario would be some alteration of the income tax distribution formula so money earned in Marion co. would go to Marion Co by residents of other counties would partially be distributed to Marion co. as opposed to now where the entirety is held by the resident's county.

  4. This is more same-old, same-old from a new generation of non-progressive 'progressives and fear mongers. One only needs to look at the economic havoc being experienced in California to understand the effect of drought on economies and people's lives. The same mindset in California turned a blind eye to the growth of population and water needs in California, defeating proposal after proposal to build reservoirs, improve water storage and delivery infrastructure...and the price now being paid for putting the demands of a raucous minority ahead of the needs of many. Some people never, never learn..

  5. I wonder if I can marry him too? Considering we are both males, wouldn't that be a same sex marriage as well? If they don't honor it, I'll scream discrimination just like all these people have....

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