Manufacturing & Technology

Lawrence turns down rezoning for vacant drive-in: Developer and city working on a compromiseRestricted Content

February 5, 2007
Jennifer Whitson
A developer wanting to breathe new life into a long-vacant drive-in theater along Pendleton Pike is working to change the minds of Lawrence leaders who already have said no thanks. New York-based Norry Management Corp. is leading an effort to redevelop the 93-acre property for retail, office and industrial uses. But its plans faced a setback last month when a rezoning petition got a negative response from officials concerned about what might end up there. Lawrence City Council members voted...
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EYE ON THE PIE: Where are the best-paying jobs?Restricted Content

February 5, 2007
Morton Marcus
Where is the best place to work if all you consider is money? Where are the wages and salaries plus benefits paid by employers the highest? We have data from the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis that help us answer the question. The data refer to 2005, the latest year available, and do not include self-employment; thus, only jobs working for someone else are counted. And remember, these data are by place of work, not place of residence. Where are...
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Tech firm Powerway seeking reboundRestricted Content

February 5, 2007
Peter Schnitzler
Powerway Inc., the Indianapolis-based maker of manufacturing quality-control software that grew like gangbusters in the 1990s and aimed for an initial public offering, has endured a dog of a half-decade. But that soon could change. Powerway just hired an IT industry turnaround expert as CEO.
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Generator-maker finding new ways to get energyRestricted Content

January 29, 2007
Chris O'Malley
I Power Energy Systems, which makes natural-gas-powered electric generators that are the primary power source of corporate and college campuses, is a novelty in Indiana. After all, coal is still a cheaper source of electricity than is natural gas. But I Power is developing applications for electric generators that burn biogas from sources ranging from garbage to ground-up corn.
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Giant Ford plant could join warehouse conversion trend: Observers say size, age may be obstaclesRestricted Content

January 29, 2007
Jennifer Whitson
City officials haven't given up hope on keeping 1,400 lucrative manufacturing jobs at an Indianapolis steering parts plant, but Ford Motor Co. has. The company this month said it will close the facility by the end of 2008. A closure will leave the 1.8-millionsquare-foot building empty, but real estate observers say it could be redeveloped as leaseable industrial space-as shuttered Chrysler, Maytag and Western Electric factories nearby have been. Some of the premier projects in the area are leasing well,...
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Corporate shopping spree: Massive Guidant deal helps make 2006 a record-setting year for local M&A activityRestricted Content

January 29, 2007
Scott Olson
Last year was a record-shattering period for the Indianapolis-area merger and acquisition market, thanks in large part to the loss of one public corporation. Guidant Corp.'s acquisition by Boston Scientific Corp. for $28.4 billion last year and the related sale of its vascular business to Abbott Laboratories for $4.1 billion made the 2006 Big Deals list bigger than ever. That's because the two deals made up about 85 percent of the $38.5 billion of M&A activity tracked down by the...
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Chocolatier maintains steady routine between busy seasonsRestricted Content

January 29, 2007
Lisa Gerstner
Each week at David Alan Chocolatier in Lebanon, three employees make a different variety of chocolate truffles, nut clusters and other chocolate-laden delights. Alan uses 7,000 pounds of chocolate a year to make his products out of the renovated gas station he has operated at since 1984.
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BULLS & BEARS: Are ingredients in place for a market 'melt-up'?Restricted Content

January 22, 2007
Dave Gilreath
A couple of years ago, I quoted legendary market analyst John Mendelson, who predicted the "mother of all short squeezes," causing a market "melt-up." So far, nobody would say we've experienced anything resembling a melt-up. In the two years since Mendelson's report, I haven't seen the words "melt-up" used. That is, until the last couple of weeks, when I saw it twice. In early January, Barron's columnist Michael Santoli was describing the state of the market. He said valuations by...
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RETURN ON TECHNOLOGY: We need less of 'cool' and more of 'can do'Restricted Content

January 22, 2007
Tim Altom
I've been accused of being both technology-besotted and technology-averse. I'm neither one. I'm just interested in using technology in appropriate ways. I'm fond of reminding people that a pair of scissors is perfect for a job that a pair of scissors can do. Scissors don't need Tim Allen-style enhancements. An example popped up from reading "The Soul of a Chef," by Michael Ruhlman, where I ran across the statement by a young chef that a computer system made the difference...
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ECONOMIC ANALYSIS: Our love-hate relationship with globalization boomRestricted Content

January 22, 2007
Patrick Barkey
Our generation didn't invent globalization, but we've certainly moved it to a new level. Even here in the isolated Midwest, it's hard to find a product, a job or a community that hasn't been affected by the high degree of connectivity among customers, businesses, and buyers and sellers of all kinds around the globe. We've enjoyed a cornucopia of incredible new products-from cell phones to flat-screen televisions to microprocessor-laden automobiles-that have had many or all of their principal parts made...
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Temp agency jumping into training, construction: Latino-owned Aztec Group's first foray is three-year project to fix up warehouse complex on near-east sideRestricted Content

January 22, 2007
Jennifer Whitson
When Rod Webb moved to the United States from Mexico in 1982, his plan was to make a career as a salesman for an Indianapolis industrial chain manufacturer. But a short stint volunteering for a group that aided migrant workers planted another seed that's now bearing fruit. After eight years running a temporary employment firm that specializes in offering Hispanic employees alternatives to field work, Webb is embarking on an ambitious plan to transform a dilapidated east-side warehouse complex into...
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College targets dropouts with new program: Ivy Tech offers high school failures chance to get degree, pursue higher educationRestricted Content

January 15, 2007
Chris O\'malley
Ivy Tech Community College this month launched a pilot program that allows high school dropouts to earn their diplomas while simultaneously working toward a certificate or associate's degree in college. Intended to improve the state's labor pool, and as a lifeline to dropouts facing a dismal life in the earnings underclass, it will first be rolled out in Bloomington, Lafayette and Terre Haute. The Indianapolis campus also will offer the program aimed at those 19 or older, although a date...
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Fortville firm's helmet pads protect U.S. troopsRestricted Content

January 8, 2007
Chris O'Malley
Fortville-based Genesis Manufacturing makes helmet pads for U.S. troops through Colorado-based Skydex Technologies, which won a contract this fall with the U.S. Air Force for 120,000 helmet pad kits. Most of the helmets have wound up in Iraq, where the military has discovered soldiers need something more than Kevlar-lined helmets to survive roadside mines and exploding Toyotas.
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Labor sector diversification could spur local economy: $200,000 study targets finance, retail and constructionRestricted Content

January 8, 2007
Peter Schnitzler
Sexier industry sectors like life sciences or motorsports get all the press. But to remain robust, the Indianapolis Private Industry Council believes, the area economy needs diversification. The 23-year-old work-force-training not-for-profit believes the nine-county area also should target three tried-and-true industries: finance and insurance; retail, hospitality and restaurants; and construction. IPIC, whose $9 million annual budget comes from public and private grants, plans to spend $200,000 during the first quarter studying the three sectors, which collectively employ 270,000 people in...
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CICP's chief launches raft of initiatives:Restricted Content

January 1, 2007
-Peter Schnitzler
In January, Mark Miles returned to Indianapolis after more than a decade at the helm of the Association of Tennis Professionals to become CEO of the Central Indiana Corporate Partnership. Twelve months later, the CICP looks much different than it did under his predecessor David Goodrich. And it could soon change even more. A former Eli Lilly and Co. executive and aide to Dan Quayle, Miles, 53, has been one of the key players in the potential consolidation of the...
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Carmel company helps clients determine next big thingRestricted Content

December 25, 2006
Justin Hesser
The employees of production-innovation consultant Insight2 interview customers, but they also watch and videotape them using various products. That footage then is dissected to see how consumers deal with problems they encounter. More times than not, the result is a new product intended to satisfy needs consumers didn't even know they had.
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'Old fashioned' values manufacture Motionwear's growth: Acquisition should fuel leotard-maker's expansionRestricted Content

December 18, 2006
Peter Schnitzler
It might seem as though the low cost of labor overseas has shifted the entire U.S. textile industry to Asia, never to return. Indianapolis-based leotard-maker Motionwear Inc. proves otherwise. The 120-employee company was acquired this month by the Italian sportswear firm FILA for an undisclosed sum and, as a result, it's poised to expand locally. Tom Wilson started the company in his attic in 1988 because his daughter Erin, an aspiring dancer, couldn't find performance apparel she liked in retail...
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ECONOMIC ANALYSIS: Amid carnage, state still a force in manufacturingRestricted Content

December 18, 2006
Patrick Barkey
What puts Indiana on the map in the world's eyes? From an image point of view, it might be race cars, basketball or even David Letterman. But in terms of economic footprint, it is our manufactured products and our goods-making and goods-moving expertise that stand out. We are a world-class manufacturer of everything from rolled steel to artificial limbs, and we employ more people and produce more output in manufacturing, proportionately speaking, than any other state in the nation. If...
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Carving a niche outside Louisville: Hoosier Bat Co. finds success with Major Leaguers, amateur baseball playersRestricted Content

December 11, 2006
Scott Olson
A three-piece wooden bat David Cook developed in 1989 became popular among professional baseball players, but ended up nearly devastating his upstart manufacturing company. Major League Baseball banned the bat just a year later after what Cook contends was a fierce lobbying effort from his largest rival, Louisville Slugger. The bat-made of ash, hickory and maple-is fused by finger jointing and remains in use at the amateur levels. The durability of the bat rivals that of an aluminum model, Cook...
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Hoosier Tire still racing: For nearly a half-century, Lakeville company has competed with the big boysRestricted Content

December 11, 2006
Anthony Schoettle
When the rubber meets the road, auto racing experts say there are few-if any-companies that outperform Lakeville-based Hoosier Racing Tire. Hoosier tires, industry sources said, are equal to their better-known brethren in racing-related sales and on-track performance. "This company has gone head-to-head with Goodyear on the biggest of all racing circuits," said Dick Berggren, editor of Speedway Illustrated and a retired racer. "I can't think of a business where the costs of entry are steeper or the level of technology...
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Marketing firm targets tech types: Seven-figure deal shows DGS' diversification is workingRestricted Content

December 4, 2006
Anthony Schoettle
When DGS Marketing Engineers signed a blockbuster deal this September with one of the nation's largest industrial chemical companies, owners of the ad agency knew making their micro-niche just a little broader was going to pay big dividends. The local marketing and advertising agency recently decided to step outside its super-specific niche of working with companies that make machine tools to target companies working in just about any technical field. "This is a specialized advertising field that goes beyond mere...
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PROFILE: Roby's Plumbing and Heating Co. Inc.: Plumber survived by staying flexible Firm entered new market, shifted business prioritiesRestricted Content

December 4, 2006
Ed Callahan
Roby's Plumbing and Heating Co. Inc. Plumber survived by staying flexible Firm entered new market, shifted business priorities Those "big box" home-supply stores make the world a scary place for independent companies such as Roby's Plumbing and Heating Co. Inc. No way can businesses like Roby compete with the big boxes' prices on pipes and other plumbing materials, owner Brad Roby said, but they can offer something the others don't-service. "Home centers provide cheap products but poor service," Roby said....
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EYE ON THE PIE: Indiana: a primer for the LegislatureRestricted Content

November 27, 2006
Morton Marcus
The General Assembly is organizing itself. This is more difficult than getting fleas to join a union. But I am being disrespectful. My purpose this week is benign. I present for the consideration of our 150 legislators certain facts about Indiana and where it ranks nationally. The data are from the 2005 American Community Survey conducted by the U.S. Bureau of the Census. First, let's consider sex. Of the 6.1 million Hoosiers, 50.9 percent are females, which leaves 49.1 percent...
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Schools warm to economic development: Colleges crank out programs to fit latest initiativesRestricted Content

November 20, 2006
Chris O\'malley
Academic purists often hold contempt for politicians and executives seeking help with economic development initiatives. It doesn't take a political science degree to wonder if someone is trying to stoke votes, ambitions or profits-on the cheap. But in Indiana, more colleges are tailoring their curriculum to support economic development priorities, realizing what's good for the region can be good for their enrollment. "An increasing number of universities don't view themselves as ivory towers anymore," said Uday Sukhatme, executive vice chancellor...
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State offers red carpet to ethanol plants despite environmental concernsRestricted Content

November 20, 2006
Chris O'Malley
The Indiana Department of Environmental Management proposes a change in regulations that could reduce the time it takes to approve air permits for ethanol plants. The change would establish industry-specific control standards for emissions.
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  1. I think the poster was being sarcastic and only posting or making fun of what is usually posted on here about anything being built in BR or d'town for that matter.

  2. Great news IRL fans: TURBO the IMS sanctioned movie about slugs running the Indy 500 has caught the Securities and Exchange Commission because Dreamworks had to take a $132MILLION write down...because the movie was such a flop. See, the Indy/IMS magic soiled another pair of drawers. Bwahahahahahaha! How's CARTOWN doing? HAHAHAHA...Indy is for losers.

  3. So disappointed in WIBC. This is the last straw to lose a good local morning program. I used to be able to rely on WIBC to give me good local information, news, weather and traffic on my 45 minute commute.Two incidents when I needed local, accurate information regarding severe weather were the first signs I could not now rely on WIBC. I work weekend 12 hour nights for a downtown hospital. This past winter when we had the worst snowfall in my 50 years of life, I came home on a Sunday morning, went to sleep (because I was to go back in Sunday night for another 12 hour shift), and woke up around 1 p.m. to a house with no electricity. I keep an old battery powered radio around and turned on WIBC to see what was going on with the winter storm and the roads and the power outage. Sigh. Only policital stuff. Not even a break in to update on the winter storm warning. The second weather incident occurred when I was driving home during a severe thunderstorm a few months ago. I had already gotten a call from my husband that a tornado warning was just southwest of where I had been. I turned to WIBC to find out what direction the storm was headed so I could figure out a route home, only to find Rush on the air, and again, no breaking away from this stupidity to give me information. Thank God for my phone, which gave me the warning that I was driving in an area where a tornado was seen. Thanks for nothing WIBC. Good luck to you, Steve! We need more of you and not the politics of hatred that WIBC wants to shove at us. Good thing I have Satellite radio.

  4. I read the retail roundup article and tried Burritos and Beers tonight. I'm glad I did, for the food was great. Fresh authentic Mexican food. Great seasoning on the carne asada. A must try!!! Thanks for sharing.

  5. John, unfortunately CTRWD wants to put the tank(s) right next to a nature preserve and at the southern entrance to Carmel off of Keystone. Not exactly the kind of message you want to send to residents and visitors (come see our tanks as you enter our city and we build stuff in nature preserves...

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