Manufacturing

Herff Jones closing yearbook plant with 130 workers

June 19, 2012
Associated Press
Herff Jones Inc. of Indianapolis has decided to close a yearbook manufacturing plant that employs 130 people in Matthews, N.C., by the end of the year.
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Herff Jones goes digital to invigorate yearbook sales

May 19, 2012
Anthony Schoettle
Local firm hired Carmel-based MediaSauce two years ago to help design, develop and market Stitch, a platform for schools to create an online version of their yearbook. The product, tested at 54 schools, is expected to roll out nationally in July.
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Stalled recovery? Gas prices, optimism on collision course

April 6, 2012
J.K. Wall
Nearly two-thirds of Hoosier business owners in a new survey said they are optimistic or moderately optimistic about the Indiana economy over the next six months. But high gas prices may dampen the enthusiasm.
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Durable goods rise outside volatile transportation

September 24, 2010
Associated Press
The overall demand for durable goods fell 1.3 percent in August, the Commerce Department said Friday. But that was pulled down by a significant drop in orders for aircraft.
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Protest at Evansville Whirlpool plant draws 1,500

February 26, 2010
Associated Press
Company shuttering plant, moving work to Mexico.
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  1. You are correct that Obamacare requires health insurance policies to include richer benefits and protects patients who get sick. That's what I was getting at when I wrote above, "That’s because Obamacare required insurers to take all customers, regardless of their health status, and also established a floor on how skimpy the benefits paid for by health plans could be." I think it's vital to know exactly how much the essential health benefits are costing over previous policies. Unless we know the cost of the law, we can't do a cost-benefit analysis. Taxes were raised in order to offset a 31% rise in health insurance premiums, an increase that paid for richer benefits. Are those richer benefits worth that much or not? That's the question we need to answer. This study at least gets us started on doing so.

  2. *5 employees per floor. Either way its ridiculous.

  3. Jim, thanks for always ready my stuff and providing thoughtful comments. I am sure that someone more familiar with research design and methods could take issue with Kowalski's study. I thought it was of considerable value, however, because so far we have been crediting Obamacare for all the gains in coverage and all price increases, neither of which is entirely fair. This is at least a rigorous attempt to sort things out. Maybe a quixotic attempt, but it's one of the first ones I've seen try to do it in a sophisticated way.

  4. In addition to rewriting history, the paper (or at least your summary of it) ignores that Obamacare policies now must provide "essential health benefits". Maybe Mr Wall has always been insured in a group plan but even group plans had holes you could drive a truck through, like the Colts defensive line last night. Individual plans were even worse. So, when you come up with a study that factors that in, let me know, otherwise the numbers are garbage.

  5. You guys are absolutely right: Cummins should build a massive 80-story high rise, and give each employee 5 floors. Or, I suppose they could always rent out the top floors if they wanted, since downtown office space is bursting at the seams (http://www.ibj.com/article?articleId=49481).

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