Media & Marketing

To the victors go the things they spoiled THERE OUGHT TO BE A LAW Ron Gifford:Restricted Content

November 13, 2006
I know self-government can be a messy thing. I'm well aware of Winston Churchill's statement that "democracy is the worst form of government except all the others that have been tried." But why is it that every time I voted Nov. 7, I felt like I needed another shower? (What? You don't vote early and often?) Well, the bad news is that the next campaign cycle began Nov. 8. The good news is that it doesn't have to be Groundhog...
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Emmis' landmark deal with Apple paying big dividends: Locally based radio group now No. 2 iTunes affiliateRestricted Content

November 13, 2006
Anthony Schoettle
Emmis Communications Corp. has a new mantra when it comes to emerging technology some say will kill the radio industry: If you can't beat 'em, join 'em. Emmis entered a relationship with California-based Apple Computer Inc. nine months ago that is paying big dividends. Since launching one of the radio industry's first iTunes storefronts on its stations' Internet sites, Emmis officials said they have become the No. 2 iTunes affiliate based on sales. Only Internet behemoth Yahoo Music sells more....
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Stations enjoy election: Political advertising bounty surprises TV, radio executivesRestricted Content

November 13, 2006
Justin Hesser
More than $10 million poured into Indianapolis broadcasters' coffers this year, experts said, as politicians took to the airwaves in hopes of swaying voters. A fierce battle over control of Congress and a hotly contested Marion County prosecutor's race contributed to the impressive total, which outpaced 2002 election sales by nearly $3 million. "It was a surprising year," said Don Lundy, general manager of WRTV-TV Channel 6, which sold more than $1.3 million in political ads. Despite attempts to forecast...
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Newspapers and civic responsibility CHRIS KATTERJOHN Commentary:Restricted Content

November 13, 2006
Lately, a bunch of wealthy, hotshot CEOs and politicos have made noises about buying some well-known metropolitan daily newspapers that are considered in play. The names are Hollywood producer David Geffen and the Los Angeles Times; retired General Electric CEO Jack Welch and the Boston Globe; and Baltimore civic leaders Walter Sondheim Jr. and Ted Venetoulis and the Baltimore Sun. What's going on here? The business is dying, isn't it? Circulation of major dailies has been in a downward spiral...
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Roof Envy: Insurers pay to fix thousands of hail-damaged homes, but some neighbors are feeling left outRestricted Content

November 13, 2006
Tammy Lieber
After an April hailstorm caused widespread damage in central Indiana, an epidemic slowly and quietly began spreading through tree-lined streets and cul-de-sacs. As contagious as the common cold, "neighboritis" is contracted through casual contact with friends and neighbors, even by the simple act of driving by a house topped with sparkling new shingles. Those infected often experience an initial wave of optimism and euphoria, sometimes followed by a crash that leaves them feeling dissatisfied, even betrayed. The cause of the...
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Lights, camera, Internet-More Web sites using video: Vodcast clips catching on as a way for organizations to deliver their message in a new, more exciting wayRestricted Content

November 13, 2006
Scott Olson
The terms for emerging Internet technology are enough to make the less savvy long for the days when e-mail seemed cutting-edge. The communication tool, especially among teens, has given way to instant messaging, of course. So it's no wonder colleges and companies alike are starting to shun standard e- mail and Web-page marketing efforts in favor of video-on-demand clips, known as vodcasts. "The computer was meant to be watched; it wasn't meant to be read," said Jon DiGregory, who founded...
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SPORTS: Glimmers of hope give Painter a long honeymoonRestricted Content

November 13, 2006
Bill Benner
In terms of a transition game, Purdue University's Matt Painter hasn't yet been able to get out on the figurative fast break. First, there was the year he spent as associate head coach during Gene Keady's long goodbye, when the Boilers struggled to a woeful 7-21 mark. Then, last season, when Painter assumed full control of the Boilermakers, injuries and suspensions factored heavily into a 9-19 record and a last-place, 3-13 finish in the Big Ten. And this year? With...
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SPORTS: IU's Sampson prepares for his toughest audienceRestricted Content

November 6, 2006
Bill Benner
CHICAGO-Yes, Kelvin Sampson has the job. It's been his since March. Nonetheless, the audition begins next week in Conseco Fieldhouse, when his IU Hoosiers basketball team opens the preseason NIT against Lafayette. Sampson will need to be into multi-tasking. Coach his team. Rise to stratospheric expectations. Restore reputations. Quiet the critics who can't get over the fact that he arrived with baggage that included more than his clothes. And, just win, baby. That will take care of virtually all of...
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BULLS & BEARS: Market may be at high, but big challenges loomRestricted Content

November 6, 2006
Ken Skarbeck
The other day, as investors basked in the glow of new stock market highs, an eyecatching headline traveled across newswires. The article, which seemed out of place with the record highs on the Dow Jones industrial average, was titled "GAO chief warns economic disaster looms." The Government Accountability Office, or GAO, is an investigative arm of Congress that audits and evaluates the performance of the federal government. The head of the GAO can be thought of as the nation's chief...
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High school dropouts go under microscope: IPS seeks answers from leaders on costly problemRestricted Content

November 6, 2006
Chris O\'malley
Indianapolis Public Schools late this month plans to convene a community panel to help the state's largest school system implement a dropout prevention plan next spring. The first public meeting of the 50-person panel is set for Nov. 27 and comes as a new report suggests Indiana dropouts cost taxpayers $62 million a year. The panel is made up of a wide range of people, from parents to community leaders. Each of the estimated 21,000 dropouts statewide costs the state...
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BEHIND THE NEWS: Guidant sale not so sweet for holders of buyer's stockRestricted Content

November 6, 2006
Greg Andrews
With almost every passing day, Boston Scientific Inc.'s $27 billion purchase of India n a p o l i s - b a s e d Guidant Corp. looks like a bigger fiasco-for the buyer, that is. Whether it was bad for the sellers-Guidant shareholders-is a trickier question. They received a stew of stock and cash in the deal and fared splendidly if they immediately sold their shares. But if they didn't, Massachusettsbased Boston Scientific's $80-a-share offer has lost its...
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Cable company rolls out on-demand advertising: Comcast already has signed deal with General MotorsRestricted Content

November 6, 2006
Anthony Schoettle
People don't typically pay for on-demand cable so that they can look at advertisements, but Comcast thinks they will. It's trying to turn an old axiom-that people avoid advertising like the plague-on its ear. The Philadelphia-based company that provides cable television in much of Marion County thinks its new on-demand advertising-launched earlier this fall-will be so popular, viewers will seek out the pitches. For Comcast digital cable subscribers, accessing on-demand ads is as easy as going to their video on-demand...
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9 ways to keep clientele coming back:Restricted Content

September 25, 2006
Ron Ackerman
The most reliable method for evaluating whether your business truly offers great customer service is customer retention. Customer-retention results reflect the customer's decision to purchase more of your products and services. After much research in this area, we know that these "re-purchase" decisions are based on three important evaluations. First, the customer decides whether you delivered the basic service promise. Did you deliver the package on time? Was the repair done correctly? Second, the customer makes some touchy-feely evaluations about...
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EYE ON THE PIE: Who is watching Hoosier journalism?Restricted Content

September 25, 2006
Morton Marcus
I recently attended a lecture on renal problems of penal populations. The study of kidney disease among prisoners has been a fascination of mine since I started watching James Cagney movies. The next day, I thought I would break out in liver spots when I read the newspaper account. The central points of the lecture were missed as the reporter bore down on other interesting, but tangential, issues. No doubt some of prisoners' kidney problems are the result of specific...
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NOTIONS: Of errors, apologies and redemptionRestricted Content

September 25, 2006
Bruce Hetrick
Last week, a friend and I stopped by Nordstrom so she could purchase some cosmetics. She found one needed product on the shelf, then asked the clerk if the item she'd asked to be sent from another store had arrived. The clerk said it had, but that they'd sold it to another customer because my friend hadn't called for it. My friend said she'd never been notified the product was in. The clerk repeated that it's store policy to sell...
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SPORTS Bill Benner: Little-noticed Horizon League prospers and growsRestricted Content

September 18, 2006
Bill Benner
SPORTS Little-noticed Horizon League prospers and grows From his fifth-floor office in Pan Am Plaza, Horizon League Commissioner Jon LeCrone has a view of the Indianapolis skyline. His only wish is that the city would look back. Not at him. At his nine-member league, which will grow to 10 next July when upstate Valparaiso joins Butler in the league's Indiana contingent. Alas, it's a prime example of good news making no news. Or of the media, local and otherwise, determining...
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RCA Championships secures ATP support: Local tournament working on TV, sponsorship dealsRestricted Content

September 18, 2006
Anthony Schoettle
In the wake of rumors that a mini offseason for players could interrupt the RCA Championships' calendar slot, the ATP-the association representing men's professionals tennis players-has come out in strong support of the local tournament. "There's no uncertainty about the future of this tournament from the ATP's perspective," said Mark V. Young, ATP's CEO for the Americas. Young confirmed that ATP officials, who set the men's professional calendar, have discussed shortening the schedule at the behest of players, who claim...
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Noblesville mega-mall begins lining up retailers: Area brokers say space is likely to lease wellRestricted Content

September 18, 2006
Jennifer Whitson
J.C. Penney, Best Buy and Bed Bath & Beyond plan to open stores in the $100 million open-air mall Simon Property Group Inc. and a partner are planning to build in Noblesville, retail brokers say. In addition, Grand Rapids, Mich.-based Goodrich Quality Theaters Inc. is in preliminary talks to open a cinema in the project, owner Bob Goodrich confirmed. Simon and another Indianapolis-based developer, Gershman Brown & Associates, announced plans for the nearly 1-million-square-foot Hamilton Towne Centre a year ago....
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NOTIONS: Dear philanthropist: Make me a daydream believerRestricted Content

September 18, 2006
Bruce Hetrick
Last month, I picked up my boys in Fort Wayne, drove north on Interstate 69, hooked a left at Interstate 94, and got off at the Portage, Mich., exit. There, we whiled away the weekend at a family reunion. The grownups ate too much, caught up on gossip and puttered around the lake in the speedboat. The teenagers, whom we rarely saw, did X-Box battle in the basement. On Sunday, after the kids had surfaced for lunch and the grandparents...
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Newspaper war erupting in northern suburbsRestricted Content

September 18, 2006
Anthony Schoettle
Two new Carmel newspapers will soon join eight others in Boone and Hamilton counties. While the region is one of the fastest growing in Indiana, journalism experts said having 10 newspapers serving a population of just under 300,000 is astounding.
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Making the right move: For companies planning a relocation, months of preparation are often in orderRestricted Content

September 18, 2006
Scott Olson
CORPORATE RELOCATION Making the right move For companies planning a relocation, months of preparation are often in order Employees of Aprimo Inc. are settling into their new digs at Parkwood Crossing after the fastgrowing marketing-softwaremaker moved its headquarters early last month. While the building may be different, the surroundings are quite familiar. The company remains in the same office complex, albeit across College Avenue from its previous space. But don't tell Dani Hughes, Aprimo's human resources representative who coordinated the...
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TOM HARTON Commentary: Crime takes indirect swipe at the artsRestricted Content

September 11, 2006
In Indianapolis, when the crime rate goes up or kids' test scores go down, it's not uncommon for people to point the finger at publicly funded sports facilities. "Our priorities are screwed up," observers opine. "We spend too much money on these playgrounds for the rich, and not enough on cops, courts and public education." The sports establishment here has been batting away this criticism for years. It goes with the territory in a city where sports is an important...
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Product gives Thomson better hand: New micro-camcorder boosts prospects for unit French parent wants to dealRestricted Content

September 11, 2006
Chris O\'malley
Thomson's latest product is a lot like the French company's presence in Carmel, these days. Small, and getting ever smaller. With half the number of employees it had in the late-1990s, Thomson's Americas unit here is about to be downsized yet again from its current 900-some jobs-but not before enjoying a bit of a surprise hit in a palm-size, under-$130 camcorder. The success of the Small Wonder camera-and a slicker new version due out this fall-could help frame the future...
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Fox Sports Midwest rebrands, unveils new plan: Local broadcasters will feel heat if strategy worksRestricted Content

September 11, 2006
Anthony Schoettle
Fox Sports Midwest-which is in the process of rebranding to Fox Sports Indiana in this market-is serving notice it intends to be the television network of choice when it comes to local sports. Shortly after wrestling part of the Indiana Pacers broadcast rights from WTTV-TV Channel 4, officials for St. Louis-based Fox Sports Midwest unveiled a plan that entails significant upgrades to its local sports programming, including adding professional, collegiate and high school sports of all sorts as well as...
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RETURN ON TECHNOLOGY: Laptop deal-breaker depends on reliabilityRestricted Content

September 4, 2006
Tim Altom
I've been scanning laptop buyer's guides lately, and I have to say that many magazine test labs seem utterly out of touch with business users. They extol the big screens, fast multimedia and other capabilities business users just don't care about. They act as if weight is a big factor for those of us who have to cart our hightech symbiotes around with us, but laptops long ago dropped below that critical barrier. Hewlett-Packard had a little notebook unit in...
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  1. Those of you yelling to deport them all should at least understand that the law allows minors (if not from a bordering country) to argue for asylum. If you don't like the law, you can petition Congress to change it. But you can't blindly scream that they all need to be deported now, unless you want your government to just decide which laws to follow and which to ignore.

  2. 52,000 children in a country with a population of nearly 300 million is decimal dust or a nano-amount of people that can be easily absorbed. In addition, the flow of children from central American countries is decreasing. BL - the country can easily absorb these children while at the same time trying to discourage more children from coming. There is tension between economic concerns and the values of Judeo-Christian believers. But, I cannot see how the economic argument can stand up against the values of the believers, which most people in this country espouse (but perhaps don't practice). The Governor, who is an alleged religious man and a family man, seems to favor the economic argument; I do not see how his position is tenable under the circumstances. Yes, this is a complicated situation made worse by politics but....these are helpless children without parents and many want to simply "ship" them back to who knows where. Where are our Hoosier hearts? I thought the term Hoosier was synonymous with hospitable.

  3. Illegal aliens. Not undocumented workers (too young anyway). I note that this article never uses the word illegal and calls them immigrants. Being married to a naturalized citizen, these people are criminals and need to be deported as soon as humanly possible. The border needs to be closed NOW.

  4. Send them back NOW.

  5. deport now

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