Media & Marketing

Cleveland tech firm going west: Parker Hannifin falls short of employment promises, plans to leave Intech ParkRestricted Content

May 1, 2006
Tom Murphy
A Cleveland-based technology giant plans to move its Intech Park operation next month, leaving behind some attractive office space and a broken promise to create jobs. Parker Hannifin Corp. will consolidate its Indianapolis location into a California site, spokesman Jim Cartwright said. It should empty its 30,700-square-foot offices in the park's Intech 10 building by the end of June. The move will have no impact on Parker Hannifin's Tell City production facility, which employs about 100 people who make industrial...
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Foundry forges growth by displaying creativity: After struggling for clients, upstart ad firm hits strideRestricted Content

May 1, 2006
Anthony Schoettle
Mark LeClerc, Matt Ganser and Jeff Morris started Foundry advertising agency in October 2004, with a five-figure bank loan and the promise of a lucrative account from an international mailorder retailer. But when their Lands' End deal fell far short of expectations, the trio was forced into cold-call mode. Because of non-compete clauses with their former employers, Foundry suddenly found itself with no active clients. "One of the first lessons we learned is that not everything promised to you comes...
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RETURN ON TECHNOLOGY: Protecting company data not always worth the effortRestricted Content

May 1, 2006
Tim Altom
Like monkeys in cages, data seems to want to be free, and will connive ways to break out of restraints. Many times it takes advantage of human carelessness, as it did in Iraq recently. Two reporters were wandering through one of the Iraqi bazaars that have sprung up outside U.S. bases, and which feature items discarded by Americans, such as old boots and broken tools. The reporters saw a number of what the media has been calling "computer drives." These...
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Gamer cashes in on hobby: Arcade cabinets combine old titles, new technologyRestricted Content

April 24, 2006
Jessica Wolfe
Rick Barretto started filling his basement with arcade games soon after graduating from Indiana University. An avid gamer since his youth, he loved to play, but to get the games he wanted, he had to buy fullsized arcade cabinets-12 of them. His basement was only so big, and his wife's tolerance only so high. "My wife was saying, 'There's got to be a better way,'" said Barretto, 39. So he put his college computer-science classes to work and spent more...
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Ivy Tech to focus more on results, not just growth: Student success and broader ties with employers among goals of community college system's five-year planRestricted Content

April 24, 2006
Chris O\'malley
After growing its enrollment 75 percent the last decade, Ivy Tech Community College of Indiana is shifting its focus to student retention. A top administrator also wants to expand the number of training courses offered at businesses, as a way to supplement the system's $253 million annual budget. Some who've studied the state's educational system have recommended that Ivy Tech spend more to hire additional full-time faculty to strengthen its effectiveness. The school's five-year student retention plan calls for doubling...
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Real estate experts examine the market: Indianapolis in good shape overall, panelists say, but job growth, incentive issues, among concernsRestricted Content

April 24, 2006
On April 14, as part of its Power Breakfast Series, the Indianapolis Business Journal gathered a panel of commercial real estate and construction experts to discuss industry conditions in the local market. In a discussion moderated by IBJ Editor Tom Harton, panelists took on a wide range of issues, including tax incentives and the status of downtown's residential and retail markets. Power Breakfast guests were Mike Curless, executive vice president and principal with Lauth Property Group; Mike Wells, president of...
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FAMILY BUSINESS: Indiana Square damage offers lesson in disaster planningRestricted Content

April 24, 2006
Eric Manterfield
The incident drove home the importance of disaster planning. When the storm struck at 10 p.m. that Sunday, who was prepared for the emergency? Employees were told not to come in the next morning, but how would they do their jobs? What files could be retrieved? Would computer systems work on Monday and later that week? What would happen to incoming and outgoing telephone and e-mail messages? The questions and potential problems were endless. Each owner of a family business...
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SMALL BUSINESS PROFILE WTH: Firm mapping out its own success Owner shifts focus from old-school engineering to GISRestricted Content

April 24, 2006
Marc D.
SMALL BUSINESS PROFILE WTH Firm mapping out its own success Owner shifts focus from old-school engineering to GIS Rex Jones wants to show off his company's work, so the lights go down, a computer comes on and a map of Starke County appears on a screen. The map is a maze of green lines representing county and local roads, red for state/interstate highways, blue for water. Jones zooms in further, picking a random street in the rural county. Up pops...
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VOICES FROM THE INDUSTRY: As construction costs rise, older buildings gain appealRestricted Content

April 24, 2006
Brian Mann
Construction costs continue to rise in the wake of hurricanes, tornadoes, the war in Iraq, the building boom in China and general inflation. The trickle-down effect often lands at the feet of small business owners. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics' Producer Price Index, prices for materials and construction components increased 0.3 percent in February, following a 1-percent hike in January and continuing a threeyear upswing. The average building cost index has increased about 45 percent since 1995,...
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CHRIS KATTERJOHN Commentary: Congress should resurrect immigration compromiseRestricted Content

April 17, 2006
As I left work April 10, I noticed a steady stream of cars pulling off Washington Street into the IBJ Corp. parking lot. The cars were full of Hispanics who had come downtown for the Big March. The sidewalks, too, held a steady flow of Hispanics heading east toward what turned out to be one of the largest public political rallies in city history. Most of the people I saw looked young-in their teens, 20s or 30s-and seemed to be...
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Star meetings unusual, not necessarily ethical breach: Political candidates invited to informational meetingRestricted Content

April 17, 2006
Anthony Schoettle
An Indianapolis Star program for political candidates that mixes information about advertising and news policies is raising eyebrows among some area politicos and media specialists. As part of their Campaign Connections program, Star officials hold cocktail receptions for Republican and Democratic candidates to discuss advertising possibilities and to explain news processes, including candidate endorsements on the editorial page. Star officials said the program dates back to the 2002 election. Star Editor Dennis Ryerson said it is made clear that buying...
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NFL pulls plug on local TV crews: Team owners vote to oust videographers from gamesRestricted Content

April 17, 2006
Anthony Schoettle
Indianapolis TV stations say a new National Football League policy that bans them from the sidelines during games is a violation of their First Amendment rights and threatens a major source of income. A league-wide rule that was passed 32-0 by team owners March 28 allows only the licensed broadcast rights-holder to shoot sideline footage during games. The National Association of Broadcasters, Radio-Television News Directors Association and Society of Professional Journalists have petitioned to have the rule overturned. Though owners...
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IndyGo claims take their toll: Payout for injuries, damages hit 3-year high, a big financial hit for cash-strapped systemRestricted Content

April 10, 2006
Chris O\'malley
"If it had been a bigger bus, I'd have been dead," said Williams, who was injured and his car totaled. IndyGo settled his case out of court for an undisclosed sum. Williams filed one of 20 tort claim notices with the Indianapolis Public Transportation Corp. last year. Those, and 10 lawsuits, seek a total of more than $2.6 million in damages. IndyGo attorneys estimate the company's total potential liability is more like $784,350, according to records obtained by IBJ. The...
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Repairs to tower may take months: Tenants scramble for other arrangementsRestricted Content

April 10, 2006
Peter Schnitzler
It was a symbol of his success. For the last three years, environmental attorney Robert Clark has relished the view from his corner office in One Indiana Square, high above the streets of Indianapolis. But on Sunday, April 2, tornadoforce winds left it in tatters. His family photos are gone. Likewise his case files and the many gifts he'd received over the years from friends or clients. "I understand there are no exterior walls," he said. "My desk is still...
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Atlas draws Fresh interest: Upscale grocery chain with a store in Carmel considers local expansionRestricted Content

April 10, 2006
Matthew Kish
North Carolina-based The Fresh Market Inc. has confirmed it's interested in the former Atlas Supermarket site at 54th Street and College Avenue. "We are looking at expanding in that area and we're looking at a lot of sites," said spokesman Eric Blaesing. "[The Atlas site] is one of them." He added that nothing is definite and "for every 100 sites you look at, you end up with one of them." N e i g h b o r s hope...
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Clarian chooses small firm for big advertising account: The Heavyweights gets nod over larger agenciesRestricted Content

April 10, 2006
Anthony Schoettle
One of central Indiana's largest advertising accounts has been awarded to a relatively small but growing agency. Clarian Health Partners this month signed what industry sources are calling a multiyear, multimillion-dollar deal with The Heavyweights, a firm headquartered in The Stutz Building downtown and best known for its creative work for clients such as Procter & Gamble and Roche Diagnostics. Officials for Clarian and The Heavyweights would not divulge the deal's terms. The Heavyweights will provide creative direction and strategy...
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Experts: Businesses should prep for bird flu: Vast majority of U.S. companies have not budgeted for possible pandemic, despite warnings from health officialsRestricted Content

April 10, 2006
Scott Olson
The much-hyped Y2K computer bug came and went without so much as a whimper from a whirring hard drive. But unlike the threat of malfunctioning computers, health experts warn that the potential danger of an avian flu pandemic is far greater. In the event of a widespread outbreak in the United States, companies large and small need to be prepared in order to keep interruptions to a minimum, they say. "I am an evangelist for having a contingency plan," said...
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SPORTS: Will Hoosier fans find room for Sampson's baggage?Restricted Content

April 3, 2006
Bill Benner
Congratulations to Kelvin Sampson? Forget that. Congrats go to Indiana University's athletic director, Rick Greenspan. In this age of wallto-wall media, talk shows, blogs feeding rumors, and undisclosed sources, that Greenspan did an "abracadabra" to pull Sampson out of his hat as IU's new men's basketball coach was an astounding piece of magic. Because of all the names mentioned in the six weeks following Mike Davis' resignation-the Steve Alfords (my choice), the Randy Wittmans, the Tom Creans, the Mark Fews,...
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City gives cultural trail green light: Long-anticipated project could cost $35M to $42MRestricted Content

April 3, 2006
Matthew Kish
The long-discussed trail will loop through downtown and cost $35 million to $42 million. All the money will come from federal transportation dollars and private contributions. "The trail has been officially approved," said Brian Payne, president of the Central Indiana Community Foundation, the project's lead managing partner. "It's definitely a project that's going to happen now." Tourism officials greeted the news with enthusiasm. It's a "huge win for White River State Park as well as the city," said Bob Whitt,...
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NOTIONS: A lesson in contemporary communication: Trust me?Restricted Content

April 3, 2006
Bruce Hetrick
I spent March 24 at Ball State University, sitting in a small conference room with some grand poobahs of public relations. A few Hoosier colleagues and I were matched with these industry mavens to discuss the rise of a phenomenon known as "citizen journalism," "participatory communication," "peer-to-peer (or p2p) communication," and other, occasionally less-flattering, terms. Whatever the moniker, the notion is this: With the proliferation of digital media and the Internet, every Dawn, Dick and Mary can create and disseminate...
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Brand balances big bucks and books: NCAA chief: Boosting revenue not out of sync with educationRestricted Content

April 3, 2006
Anthony Schoettle
Which of those constituent groups is most important to Brand is open to debate. Since Brand stepped down as Indiana University president to take over at the NCAA in January 2003, the association's annual revenue has grown from $433.2 million to $521.1 million. The increase is driven largely by an 11-year, $6 billion TV contract with CBS that took effect during the 2002-2003 sports season. Under Brand's watch, the NCAA has ushered in new sponsors, including Sirius Satellite Radio, Direct...
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ABDUL-HAKIM SHABAZZ Commentary: Mayor: Look elsewhere for Indy Works votesRestricted Content

April 3, 2006
As another legislative session fades into memories and lawmakers go back to their districts to explain their votes, it's a good time to offer some advice to Indianapolis Mayor Bart Peterson. I have always liked Hizzoner and we have had good interaction. I think it's safe to say we both agree on consolidating government, but we may disagree on method. I come from the school of thought that says, "Destroy your opponents and parade their heads on spears in the...
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CHRIS KATTERJOHN Commentary: Newspapers' eulogies prematureRestricted Content

April 3, 2006
With the proliferation of news sites on the Internet, much has been made of the pending death of newspapers. As the so-called new media attract bigger and bigger audiences, especially among young adults, newspapers are being characterized as the "emblem of the old media" and "an industry on the defensive." Not so fast. As we consider the demise of newspapers, it would be wise to do a reality check on current trends and perhaps revisit the ideas that made newspapers...
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Art Institute students face changing world of design: Businesses should keep interior designers in demandRestricted Content

March 27, 2006
Tracy Donhardt
Facing an expanding world of corporate rebranding, homier hospital rooms and high-tech theaters in every suburb, students entering the field of interior design know they'll be doing more than redecorating high-end homes. What once was considered predominantly a luxury service for wealthy homeowners wanting to expand their drawing rooms, interior design became a necessity in business years ago. Today, a majority of interior designers handle both residential and commercial work. And a growing number of firms that specialize in commercial...
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Steel Dynamics seeks part of former Olin site: Metal recycling operation would serve expanding Hendricks County millRestricted Content

March 27, 2006
Tammy Lieber
The site of the former Olin Brass factory on the near-west side might soon roar to life again if a plan to erect a metal recycling operation there comes through. A joint venture between Fort Waynebased Steel Dynamics Inc., Chicagobased Metal Management Inc. and local hauler Ray's Trash is seeking city approval to install a metal shredder and recycling operation on about 40 acres at Holt Road and Airport Expressway. The venture, called Metal Dynamics LLC, would accept scrap metal...
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  1. How much you wanna bet, that 70% of the jobs created there (after construction) are minimum wage? And Harvey is correct, the vast majority of residents in this project will drive to their jobs, and to think otherwise, is like Harvey says, a pipe dream. Someone working at a restaurant or retail store will not be able to afford living there. What ever happened to people who wanted to build buildings, paying for it themselves? Not a fan of these tax deals.

  2. Uh, no GeorgeP. The project is supposed to bring on 1,000 jobs and those people along with the people that will be living in the new residential will be driving to their jobs. The walkable stuff is a pipe dream. Besides, walkable is defined as having all daily necessities within 1/2 mile. That's not the case here. Never will be.

  3. Brad is on to something there. The merger of the Formula E and IndyCar Series would give IndyCar access to International markets and Formula E access the Indianapolis 500, not to mention some other events in the USA. Maybe after 2016 but before the new Dallara is rolled out for 2018. This give IndyCar two more seasons to run the DW12 and Formula E to get charged up, pun intended. Then shock the racing world, pun intended, but making the 101st Indianapolis 500 a stellar, groundbreaking event: The first all-electric Indy 500, and use that platform to promote the future of the sport.

  4. No, HarveyF, the exact opposite. Greater density and closeness to retail and everyday necessities reduces traffic. When one has to drive miles for necessities, all those cars are on the roads for many miles. When reasonable density is built, low rise in this case, in the middle of a thriving retail area, one has to drive far less, actually reducing the number of cars on the road.

  5. The Indy Star announced today the appointment of a new Beverage Reporter! So instead of insightful reports on Indy pro sports and Indiana college teams, you now get to read stories about the 432nd new brewery open or some obscure Hoosier winery winning a county fair blue ribbon. Yep, that's the coverage we Star readers crave. Not.

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