Media & Marketing

SPORTS: NCAA not shy about taking on hot-button issuesRestricted Content

August 22, 2005
Bill Benner
The Indianapolisbased NCAA can be-and usually is-accused of a lot of things. Sticking its big, bureaucratic head in the sand is not one of them, at least not any longer. Say what you will about the organization under the leadership of Myles Brand since he came on board as president 2-1/2 years ago, but he has seen to it that wishy-washy is a term best left at the Laundromat. Academic reform and accountability, student-athlete welfare, a streamlined legislative process, rules...
More

GuyFest: Motorcycles, brewers, home theaters ... New event targets CEOs to steelworkersRestricted Content

August 22, 2005
Anthony Schoettle
It's not a new medical procedure, but a three-day event Compton calls "a magical place-home to both the steelworker and the CEO." Testostorama Men's Expo, planned for Nov. 11-13 at the Indiana State Fairgrounds, is being hyped to men of all ages and backgrounds "as payback for all those years she dragged you to the Flower and Patio show." "We cooked up this event and put a little edge to it," Compton said. Testostorama organizers expect more than 200 exhibitors-from...
More

EYE ON THE PIE: Prison reform is off state's radarRestricted Content

August 22, 2005
Morton Marcus
What do the following cities have in common? Auburn, C r aw f o r d s v i l l e , Greenfield, Griffith, Huntington, Logansport, New Castle, Seymour and Shelbyville. Each has a smaller population than the number of people in Indiana prisons. The Indiana Department of Correction reports we have more than 19,600 adults in our prisons at an annual cost in excess of $21,500 per prisoner per year, for a total of $420 million. According to...
More

EYE ON THE PIE: Let's turn our children into assetsRestricted Content

August 15, 2005
Morton Marcus
Could we reduce some of the major costs in our society if we had fewer children and more immigration from abroad? Think about it. Children, particularly those 15 to 19 years of age, are a major disruptive and expensive aspect of our nation. They establish behaviors that lead to lifelong misery for themselves and expenses for the rest of us. Teens get into all sorts of costly trouble. They lead police on dangerous chases because they will not obey the...
More

TOM HARTON Commentary: Dragging parents back to classRestricted Content

August 15, 2005
The day he was hired in June, Indianapolis Public Schools Superintendent Eugene White broached a topic too often missing in the dialogue about public education. White said that parents are among those who will be held accountable for student achievement in Indianapolis Public Schools. The words "parents" and "accountable" might have shown up together on a school vocabulary test sometime in the last 100 years, but they don't often go together when those of us who aren't in the trenches...
More

BEHIND THE NEWS: Obstacles facing Marsh cast questions over Atlas projectRestricted Content

August 15, 2005
Greg Andrews
Marsh Supermarkets Inc. ended rampant speculation when it announced last September that it was buying the former Atlas grocery site at 54th Street and College Avenue and would build an Arthur's Fresh Market there. Or did it? Nearly a year after Marsh officials unveiled their plans, the former Atlas building slated for demolition remains standing, surrounded by a chain-link security fence. "We were pretty sure construction would have started by now," said James Garrettson, president of the Meridian Kessler Neighborhood...
More

Adidas sale could bring changes to former Reebok facility: German sports giant has a history of using overseas manufacturing sitesRestricted Content

August 15, 2005
Anthony Schoettle
Adidas' plan to buy Massachusettsbased Reebok International Inc. for $3.8 billion has put the future of Reebok's eastside manufacturing plant in doubt again. Though Reebok officials insist the immediate future is secure for the 600,000-square-foot operation off Post Road, industry experts say changes are on the way. Reebok took ownership of the facility in 2001 when it bought Indianapolis-based licensed apparel maker Logo Athletic out of bankruptcy court. Since then, Reebok has invested heavily and expanded local staff from 400...
More

State bundles media buying: Firms here question whether small Fort Wayne-based agency can handle $10M contractRestricted Content

August 15, 2005
Anthony Schoettle
In a move that has rankled some central Indiana advertising agencies, Gov. Mitch Daniels' office this month awarded a $10 million-$12 million media buying contract encompassing all state agencies to Fort Wayne-based Asher Agency. Asher in turn promised to save the state $900,000 in the coming year. The contract, a one-year deal with a oneyear renewal option, calls for Asher to place television, radio, print and outdoor advertising for the Hoosier Lottery, Indiana State Fair, Indiana Criminal Justice Institute, Office...
More

SPORTS: Tiller rescued Purdue but isn't immune to criticsRestricted Content

August 15, 2005
Bill Benner
This year the NCAA mandated that Division I-A football media guides be reduced to a uniform 212 pages. Keep in mind that these fonts of information intended for inkstained wretches had morphed into voluminous pitch-tools for recruits and brag books for boosters. The cutback didn't prevent Purdue's sports information office from devoting a copious 11 pages of copy in its 2005 guide to Joltin' Joe Tiller. Perhaps I (or you, dear reader) should read nothing more into that other than...
More

Eli Lilly spawns start-up: Maaguzi plans rapid growth selling software to manage clinical research trialsRestricted Content

August 15, 2005
Tom Murphy
Eli Lilly and Co. has sold clinical-research software it created to a veteran Indianapolis entrepreneur who plans to market it globally, potentially growing his startup company into one of the area's largest technology firms. Joe Huffine, best known as co-founder of the technology consultancy Onex Inc., said his new firm, Maaguzi LLC, should benefit as the market for research software grows explosively. Maaguzi's software allows researchers and patients to record data electronically instead of on paper. The software is geared...
More

State firms pioneers in boosting electric efficiency:Restricted Content

August 15, 2005
-Chris O\'malley
Indiana already has a number of firms working on technology aimed at boosting energy efficiency and capacity. Early this month, Indianapolis-based Trexco LLC said the U.S. Patent Office awarded it two dozen patents for a cooling system it has developed for large electrical transformers, such as those used at utility substations. The "transformer extender" is designed to stretch the capacity and lifespan of the transformers, which typically cost $2 million to $5 million and are the size of a Mack...
More

New names shake up radio market ratings: Hank and Jack see gains; WFMS and WFBQ lose groundRestricted Content

August 8, 2005
Anthony Schoettle
Two radio newcomers known as Hank and Jack are two-stepping and fist-pumping their way up the local radio ratings ladder. Meanwhile, stalwarts WFMS-FM 95.5 and WFBQ-FM 94.7 have found their grips on the top rungs loosening. The first major reshuffling in local radio station ratings in nearly a decade is having wide-ranging effects on advertising demand and rates. The release of New York-based Arbitron Inc.'s spring rating book July 29 touched off a flurry of debate about who won and...
More

ECONOMIC ANALYSIS: Growth of GDP better than might first appearRestricted Content

August 8, 2005
Patrick Barkey
What happens when the world's largest economy continues to grow at a faster rate than that of any other industrialized nation? The answer is, a tremendous amount of wealth is created. That's the real reason investment dollars and boatloads of consumer goods continue to land on our shores from abroad every day. Compared to the tepid growth in the rest of the other mature economies around the globe, we are still the best game to be found. That's a more...
More

SPORTS: Before the first kickoff, all is well on IU gridironRestricted Content

August 8, 2005
Bill Benner
C H I C AG O - Almost a year ago in this space, I wrote about IU's then-new athletic director, Rick Greenspan, observing that his arrival coincided with the beginning of football season, which would allow him to be immediately confronted with the Athletic Department's most pressing and obvious problem. Under Gerry DiNardo, an uninspired choice to begin with, Hoosier football was continuing its mired-in-the-muck ways, hopelessly spinning its wheels. Horrible as a game coach and even worse in...
More

Haverstick lands DWD's controversial IT contract: Original award to India-based Tata was election issueRestricted Content

August 8, 2005
Peter Schnitzler
Last year, it was the contract that helped turn the gubernatorial election. Now, it's a nice piece of business for Carmel-based Haverstick Government Solutions. When Indiana awarded a multimilliondollar project to an India-based information-technology developer, Gov. Joe Kernan, a Democrat, endured intense criticism. By November, Kernan had canceled the agreement with Bombay-based Tata Consultancy Services Ltd. He also introduced "Opportunity Indiana," an initiative for government-procurement reform. But the political damage had already been done. Republican Mitch Daniels triumphed at the...
More

Co-owner gives golf course a woman's touch: Multiple tees and restrooms make the Purgatory Club in Noblesville one of the best in the country for femalesRestricted Content

August 8, 2005
Laura Kruty
Purgatory isn't just for women. Purgatory Golf Club in Noblesville, that is. True, you can buy pink hooded sweatshirts, pink-and-white golf shoes and scented candles in the Pro Shop. And one night a month is designated Ladies Night, where women can play a round of golf, enjoy food and wine and win prizes. But don't be fooled. Purgatory isn't some cookie-cutter golf course. When played from the back tees, it's one of the longest courses east of the Mississippi-nearly 7,800...
More

ECONOMIC ANALYSIS: Hoosiers are wallflowers as housing party rocks onRestricted Content

August 1, 2005
Patrick Barkey
Have you heard about the wild party that's going on? It's not one of those parties with wine, women and song. It's all about buying and selling, and making lots of money. And, for some Americans, at least, it's being done from the comfort of their own homes. It's called the housing market, and in some corners of the country, it's a rowdy affair. In coastal California and Florida, the price of homes is going up so fast it is...
More

TAWN PARENT Commentary: It takes a village to save a marriageRestricted Content

August 1, 2005
Divorce is a costly proposition-for families, for the courts, for business and for society. And it's especially costly in Indianapolis. We have more divorced residents than any other major Midwestern city, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. As a result, companies suffer. Nationally, divorce costs companies an estimated $11 billion a year, according to the Sherman Oaks, Calif.-based Grief Recovery Institute, an educational foundation. Employees going through a divorce typically are confronting emotional, financial and legal challenges. In surveys of...
More

Riverview Hospital opens health care, fitness center:Restricted Content

August 1, 2005
Riverview Hospital opened a Health Care Pavilion July 5 at 146th Street and Hazel Dell Parkway. The 15,000-square-foot facility is the first building to open in the new $5.2 million health and fitness complex. The pavilion will be home to Hazel Dell Family and Immediate Care, as well as several physicians specializing in such areas as women's health, preventive medicine and sports medicine. The second building in the complex, the Riverview Health and Fitness Center, is slated to open in...
More

City planners seek ways to replace PRI convention: Annual event was big money maker each DecemberRestricted Content

August 1, 2005
Ed Callahan
Indianapolis hospitality leaders have launched a campaign to make up for the loss of a huge racing industry convention that is taking a hiatus from the city for the next half-decade. The Performance Racing Industry, or PRI, trade show has been a major event for the Indianapolis' convention business for seven years, annually bringing up to 40,000 visitors to the city who spend more than $26.7 million. This event was especially valued because it typically took place in early December,...
More

Solheim fills LPGA marketing cup: Sold-out international event at Crooked Stick set to be anchor of new advertising campaignRestricted Content

August 1, 2005
Anthony Schoettle
With unprecedented growth in Solheim Cup ticket and sponsorship sales, the LPGA is preparing to use the September event at Crooked Stick Golf Club as a cornerstone for its new, racier marketing campaign. The LPGA, working with the Indiana Sports Corp., quickly sold out the event earlier this year and expects more than 150,000 people to come through the turnstiles for the three days of practice and three days of competition for the international women's golf event. "We had so...
More

University Place getting major makeover: New owner IUPUI investing $13M in renovation of 18-year-old hotelRestricted Content

August 1, 2005
Scott Olson
A hotel built during an era in which Indianapolis first laid claim to its title of Amateur Sports Capital of the World has a new owner that is spending millions of dollars to bring the structure into the new century. University Place Conference Center & Hotel, on the campus of IUPUI, opened amid the fanfare of the Pan American Games hosted by Indianapolis in 1987. Nearly 4,500 athletes from 38 countries converged on downtown, including a throng of media that...
More

SPORTS: A history lesson for 21st century stadium criticsRestricted Content

July 25, 2005
Bill Benner
It is Oct. 20, 1971. I am standing near Market and Alabama streets, where the groundbreaking has taken place for a venue to be called Market Square Arena. The price tag is a salty $23 million, and the project has attracted critics and naysayers who wonder about the city's priorities, especially since our mayor, Richard Lugar, is using federal revenuesharing funds to help pay for the arena. Plus, Lugar has this wacky idea about using the arena as a catalyst...
More

Radio Disney catching the ears of youth-and advertisers: Event marketing key to getting local kids to tune inRestricted Content

July 25, 2005
Anthony Schoettle
Two years after its launch, Radio Disney's local WRZD-FM 98.3 affiliate is outperforming many affiliates in the 55-station network, even though traditional measures of its success are anything but magical. WRZD's rating by New York-based Arbitron Inc., the industry's standard media research firm, shows the station barely cracking the top 20 in this market. But WRZD has prospered through another number: listener calls per day. The station averages an eye-popping 4,070 calls a day, according to officials at Radio Disney's...
More

NOTIONS: Pugilism, Parkinson's, politics, DNA: a powerful combination set to winRestricted Content

July 25, 2005
Bruce Hetrick
If you knew only that Scott Newman is a former prosecutor, you might think his new workouts apt. The man known for courtroom sparring now feints, weaves, jabs and thrusts with a former Golden Gloves boxing champion. But that's not all we know about the 44-year-old Republican twice elected Marion County prosecutor. For in 2002, Newman also became Indianapolis' most public Parkinson's patient. Today, Newman says boxing provides the perfect exercise for the neurologically challenged. "Parkinson's is a movement disease,"...
More
Page  << 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 >> pager
Sponsored by
ADVERTISEMENT

facebook - twitter on Facebook & Twitter

Follow on TwitterFollow IBJ on Facebook:
Follow on TwitterFollow IBJ's Tweets on these topics:
 
Subscribe to IBJ
  1. Socialized medicine works great for white people in Scandanavia. It works well in Costa Rica for a population that is partly white and partly mestizo. I don't really see Obamacare as something aimed against whites. I think that is a Republican canard designed to elicit support from white people for republican candidates who don't care about them any more than democrats care about the non-whites they pander to with their phony maneuvers. But what is different between Costa Rica nd the Scandanavian nations on one hand and the US on the other? SIZE. Maybe the US is just too damn big. Maybe it just needs to be divided into smaller self governing pieces like when the old Holy Roman Empire was dismantled. Maybe we are always trying the same set of solutions for different kinds of people as if we were all the same. Oh-- I know-- that is liberal dogma, that we are all the same. Which is the most idiotic American notion going right back to the propaganda of 1776. All men are different and their differences are myriad and that which is different is not equal. The state which pretends men are all the same is going to force men to be the same. That is what America does here, that is what we do in our stupid overseas wars, that is how we destroy true diversity and true difference, and we are all as different groups of folks, feeling the pains of how capitalism is grinding us down into equally insignificant proletarian microconsumers with no other identity whether we like it or not. And the Marxists had this much right about the War of Independence: it was fundamentally a war of capitalist against feudal systems. America has been about big money since day one and whatever gets in the way is crushed. Health care is just another market and Obamacare, to the extent that it Rationalizes and makes more uniform a market which should actually be really different in nature and delivery from place to place-- well that will serve the interests of the biggest capitalist stakeholders in health care which is not Walmart for Gosh Sakes it is the INSURANCE INDUSTRY. CUI BONO Obamacare? The insurance industry. So republicans drop the delusion pro capitalist scales from your eyes this has almost nothing to do with race or "socialism" it has to do mostly with what the INSURANCE INDUSTRY wants to have happen in order to make their lives and profits easier.

  2. Read the article - the reason they can't justify staying is they have too many medicare/medicaid patients and the re-imbursements for transporting these patient is so low.

  3. I would not vote for Bayh if he did run. I also wouldn't vote for Pence. My guess is that Bayh does not have the stomach to oppose persons on the far left or far right. Also, outside of capitalizing on his time as U. S. Senator (and his wife's time as a board member to several companies) I don't know if he is willing to fight for anything. If people who claim to be in the middle walk away from fights with the right and left wing, what are we left with? Extremes. It's probably best for Bayh if he does not have the stomach for the fight but the result is no middle ground.

  4. JK - I meant that the results don't ring true. I also questioned the 10-year-old study because so much in the "health care system" has changed since the study was made. Moreover, it was hard to get to any overall conclusion or observation with the article. But....don't be defensive given my comments; I still think you do the best job of any journalist in the area shedding light and insight on important health care issues.

  5. Probably a good idea he doesn't run. I for one do not want someone who lives in VIRGINIA to be the governor. He gave it some thought, but he likes Virginia too much. What a name I cannot say on this site! The way these people think and operate amuses me.

ADVERTISEMENT