Media & Marketing

Katrina could complicate sale of Emmis TV station: Undaunted, New Orleans WVUE begins to rebuildRestricted Content

September 19, 2005
Anthony Schoettle
WVUE-TV Channel 8 in New Orleans has no transmitter, no offices, little functional equipment and a skeleton staff. The station owned by Indianapolis-based Emmis Communications Corp. also has no paying advertisers and a depleted audience, thanks to Hurricane Katrina. The devastation wrought by one of the nation's worst natural disasters puts plans to sell the station on hold as WVUE officials survey the millions of dollars in damage to their facilities and equipment and fight to get back on the...
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United Way campaign facing dual challenges this year: Onetime gifts, charitable response to Katrina devastation complicates already-complex fund driveRestricted Content

September 19, 2005
Andrea Muirragui
It's never easy for United Way of Central Indiana-raising money seldom is. But this year, organizers went into the annual fund-raising drive with an additional challenge: replacing $1.5 million in one-time donations that helped get the 2004 campaign to its $36.6 million goal. Their task is complicated by the fact that this year's effort started just as the philanthropic response to Hurricane Katrina kicked into high gear. Americans have given nearly $1 billion to disaster relief already, and the impact...
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Attorney: Heiress opposed big gifts: Deposition says Lilly upset when arts groups got $185MRestricted Content

September 19, 2005
Greg Andrews
Ruth Lilly garnered headlines around the globe in 2002 after an Indianapolis judge approved a new estate plan for the heiress that earmarked an estimated $185 million for two tiny arts organizations, the Chicago-based Poetry Foundation and Washington, D.C.-based Americans for the Arts. Now, in a newly public deposition, Lilly's personal attorney, Tom Ewbank, charges his client was opposed to the large bequests and instead had wanted to funnel more of her billion-dollar estate into her own foundation, for the...
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Interest high for soon-to-be-shuttered foundry: Size, location make redevelopment promisingRestricted Content

September 19, 2005
Tammy Lieber
When the workers at DaimlerChrysler Corp.'s Indianapolis Foundry clock out for the last time at the end of the month, they'll leave behind 756,000 square feet of factory space, tons of equipment, and more than 52 acres of industrial land on the city's west side. Rather than becoming a rusting industrial relic along Interstate 70, however, the buildings will be razed and real estate experts expect the land will soon find a new use, albeit likely not for a factory....
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IPS seeks property swap: School district will trade prime Mass Ave land if deal is rightRestricted Content

September 12, 2005
Tracy Donhardtreporter
But an unusual component of the soon-to-be-released request for proposals by Indianapolis Public Schools, the property's owner, has many wondering if anyone has what it will take to win the coveted piece of real estate. What it'll take is the offering of a replacement facility where IPS can move its central transportation facility and other school district operations. "That's the general concept," said SteveYoung, chief of facilities management for IPS. "We're not looking to sell it. We would have to...
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ECONOMIC ANALYSIS: Façade of confidence saves us from anarchyRestricted Content

September 12, 2005
Patrick Barkey
You may not know this, but every banker and policymaker does. If every one of us got out of bed tomorrow morning, drove to our banks or financial institutions, and tried to withdraw our money, the system that seems so solid today would suffer a complete collapse. The same thing would happen to the electrical grid if every device that could draw power were switched on at once. In fact, if every one of us decided today to fill up...
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Storm's local impact mixed: Katrina's aftermath will take toll on business, but rebuilding efforts might offer opportunitiesRestricted Content

September 5, 2005
Chris O\'malley
Hurricane Katrina will be both a curse and a blessing to Indiana companies, which will cope with higher fuel costs and shipping problems but find themselves awash in opportunities to sell materials and machinery for rebuilding Gulf cities. Besides weathering the immediate impact of higher fuel prices, Hoosier firms will pay more for a range of goods, because of the trickle-down effect of higher shipping costs. "Our biggest concern continues to be on the ever-increasing cost of fuel. That's s...
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SPORTS: Championship contenders bring out Mr. SofteeRestricted Content

September 5, 2005
Bill Benner
My friend, the young radio sports talk show host, tells me I've become Mister Softee. He says I have lost my edge. He wonders why I don't rattle cages like I used to. He says the Indianapolis Colts have to win the Super Bowl this year, and anything less should be considered an abject failure. And I say, poppycock. He says winning a championship is the only measurement of success in professional sports. And I say, baloney. He says if...
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Contractors work to resurrect historic church: Buggs Temple being rebuilt from inside out into entertainment venueRestricted Content

September 5, 2005
Tammy Lieber
When a team of developers took on the renovation of downtown's Buggs Temple in fall 2003, most windows in the historic church were missing, the roof was riddled with holes, and much of the sanctuary floor was in the basement. Almost two years later, it's difficult to gauge the progress of the project by sight. The floor is entirely gone, as are the balcony, the doors and the few windows that remained. In that time, however, the building on West...
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VOICES FROM THE INDUSTRY: Proper stormwater management saves money in long run Property owners should consider alternative methods for site developmentRestricted Content

September 5, 2005
Fred Green
To save themselves from unforeseen trouble down the road, buyers of site-development and buildingdesign services would be wise to consider the joint efforts of an experienced architectural firm working in tandem with an environmental consultant. The reason is fairly simple: Architects are trained to have knowledge in so many diverse and ever-changing subjects that the singular expertise of an environmental consultant can provide significant support in an area still quite new to many designers. While working with restrictive rules and...
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City's mall gamble paid off: After 10 years, Circle Centre at core of rejuvenated downtownRestricted Content

September 5, 2005
Greg Andrews
In February, Goldsmith suspended construction while he and advisers analyzed options. Within months, he gave Circle Centre the green light, and construction resumed-but not because he was convinced the project would succeed. "In the end, we decided job creation in the urban core and the psychological survival of the city were dependent on some development occurring downtown," recalled Goldsmith, now a professor at Harvard University. "We went forward with the mall with great anxiety." Today, 10 years after the September...
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IPS building consensus before building: So far, seeking input from neighbors has avoided major legal fights during $832 million construction programRestricted Content

September 5, 2005
Scott Olson
A plan to renovate School 57 in the eastside Irvington neighborhood might require the demolition of three nearby homes whose owners welcome the idea. That is in stark contrast to the Meridian-Kessler residents who vehemently opposed a proposal earlier this year that could have taken three houses to accommodate the expansion of School 84. But in both instances, Indianapolis Public Schools is likely to avoid invoking eminent domain powers to forcefully acquire the properties. In doing so, the school corporation...
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Indianapolis responds to Katrina devastation:Restricted Content

September 5, 2005
Andrea Muirragui
Local philanthropic response to the epic disaster was almost immediate. Television and radio stations alike urged central Indiana audiences to make donations at dozens of collection sites, and the Salvation Army's Indiana Division broke out its red kettles to help. The corporate community also responded. Gifts made by IBJ's deadline include: Indianapolis-based Eli Lilly and Co. said it will contribute $1 million to the American Red Cross and match all contributions made by its U.S. employees. Lilly also will give...
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Ethanol fuel pumps may debut here by '06: Still no place for the masses to buy E85, despite interest in the alternative to gasolineRestricted Content

August 29, 2005
Chris O\'malley
Even though Indiana is one of the nation's biggest growers of corn-the key ingredient in cheaper-than-gasoline ethanol-not a single ethanol pump is available to the average motorist in the Indianapolis area. That twisted irony in a day of record gasoline prices may soon be no more, with a handful of central Indiana gas stations likely to start offering an ethanol alternative-known as E85-by yearend, according to proponents of the fuel. "I hope by Christmas to have a couple in the...
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Student teachers get taste of urban schools: Ball State lets future educators spend semester in IPSRestricted Content

August 29, 2005
Tracy Donhardtreporter
For many students majoring in education at Ball State University, thinking about teaching in an urban elementary school conjures up images of unruly students, apathetic parents and old, rundown buildings. These and other similarly negative perceptions are generally inaccurate, say BSU educators, but they are gathered in surveys conducted each year. So the BSU Urban Semester Program places students in an Indianapolis Public School for 16 weeks in the hope they acquire more positive-and accurate-images. "We find students have horrible...
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SPORTS: Life lessons revealed on a nine-hole golf courseRestricted Content

August 29, 2005
Bill Benner
I received the best golf lesson of my life recently, and it didn't cost a dime. My instructor didn't work on my grip, my stance or my posture at address. He didn't tell me to keep my head down, my left arm straight or to turn my hips toward the target. We didn't talk about fluffy, plugged or tight lies. We didn't talk about reading putts or reading divots. We didn't work on driving, long irons, short irons, wedge play...
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IU makes pigskin promotional push: New coach, aggressive advertising are part of multi-prong strategy to escape financial holeRestricted Content

August 29, 2005
Anthony Schoettle
The Indiana University Athletic Department is intent on reaping financial rewards from its football program for the first time in more than a decade with a marketing campaign built around its affable new coach, Terry Hoeppner. IU officials said they will spend nearly as much on marketing the school's football program this year as on Hoeppner's $250,000 base salary. Bolstering football attendance is a critical step toward stopping financial hemorrhaging in the school's Athletic Department, IU officials said. In 2004,...
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BEHIND THE NEWS: New Ritter's CEO patches up frayed franchisee relationsRestricted Content

August 29, 2005
Greg Andrews
If Ritter's Frozen Custard goes on to prosper, the behindthe-scenes retooling the Carmel-based chain received over the past year will make a revealing case study for MBA students. IBJ in September 2004 reported the Ritter family had reacquired control of RFC Franchising LLC and installed Bob Ritter, son of retired founder John Ritter, to replace Saul Lemke as CEO. Franchisees in the chain, which has 62 stores in eight states, were glad to see Lemke go. Their view: During his...
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ECONOMIC ANALYSIS: High energy prices make consumers act rationallyRestricted Content

August 29, 2005
Patrick Barkey
Have you seen the latest opinion polls on the Bush administration? At a time when the U.S. economy is growing faster than that of any other industrialized nation, when unemployment rates are down and consumer spending is up, less than half of us think the president is doing a good job handling the economy. There's plenty to find fault in our economic performance, of course. We still have a massive trade imbalance with the rest of the world. The federal...
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SPORTS: NCAA not shy about taking on hot-button issuesRestricted Content

August 22, 2005
Bill Benner
The Indianapolisbased NCAA can be-and usually is-accused of a lot of things. Sticking its big, bureaucratic head in the sand is not one of them, at least not any longer. Say what you will about the organization under the leadership of Myles Brand since he came on board as president 2-1/2 years ago, but he has seen to it that wishy-washy is a term best left at the Laundromat. Academic reform and accountability, student-athlete welfare, a streamlined legislative process, rules...
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GuyFest: Motorcycles, brewers, home theaters ... New event targets CEOs to steelworkersRestricted Content

August 22, 2005
Anthony Schoettle
It's not a new medical procedure, but a three-day event Compton calls "a magical place-home to both the steelworker and the CEO." Testostorama Men's Expo, planned for Nov. 11-13 at the Indiana State Fairgrounds, is being hyped to men of all ages and backgrounds "as payback for all those years she dragged you to the Flower and Patio show." "We cooked up this event and put a little edge to it," Compton said. Testostorama organizers expect more than 200 exhibitors-from...
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EYE ON THE PIE: Prison reform is off state's radarRestricted Content

August 22, 2005
Morton Marcus
What do the following cities have in common? Auburn, C r aw f o r d s v i l l e , Greenfield, Griffith, Huntington, Logansport, New Castle, Seymour and Shelbyville. Each has a smaller population than the number of people in Indiana prisons. The Indiana Department of Correction reports we have more than 19,600 adults in our prisons at an annual cost in excess of $21,500 per prisoner per year, for a total of $420 million. According to...
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EYE ON THE PIE: Let's turn our children into assetsRestricted Content

August 15, 2005
Morton Marcus
Could we reduce some of the major costs in our society if we had fewer children and more immigration from abroad? Think about it. Children, particularly those 15 to 19 years of age, are a major disruptive and expensive aspect of our nation. They establish behaviors that lead to lifelong misery for themselves and expenses for the rest of us. Teens get into all sorts of costly trouble. They lead police on dangerous chases because they will not obey the...
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TOM HARTON Commentary: Dragging parents back to classRestricted Content

August 15, 2005
The day he was hired in June, Indianapolis Public Schools Superintendent Eugene White broached a topic too often missing in the dialogue about public education. White said that parents are among those who will be held accountable for student achievement in Indianapolis Public Schools. The words "parents" and "accountable" might have shown up together on a school vocabulary test sometime in the last 100 years, but they don't often go together when those of us who aren't in the trenches...
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BEHIND THE NEWS: Obstacles facing Marsh cast questions over Atlas projectRestricted Content

August 15, 2005
Greg Andrews
Marsh Supermarkets Inc. ended rampant speculation when it announced last September that it was buying the former Atlas grocery site at 54th Street and College Avenue and would build an Arthur's Fresh Market there. Or did it? Nearly a year after Marsh officials unveiled their plans, the former Atlas building slated for demolition remains standing, surrounded by a chain-link security fence. "We were pretty sure construction would have started by now," said James Garrettson, president of the Meridian Kessler Neighborhood...
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  1. You are correct that Obamacare requires health insurance policies to include richer benefits and protects patients who get sick. That's what I was getting at when I wrote above, "That’s because Obamacare required insurers to take all customers, regardless of their health status, and also established a floor on how skimpy the benefits paid for by health plans could be." I think it's vital to know exactly how much the essential health benefits are costing over previous policies. Unless we know the cost of the law, we can't do a cost-benefit analysis. Taxes were raised in order to offset a 31% rise in health insurance premiums, an increase that paid for richer benefits. Are those richer benefits worth that much or not? That's the question we need to answer. This study at least gets us started on doing so.

  2. *5 employees per floor. Either way its ridiculous.

  3. Jim, thanks for always ready my stuff and providing thoughtful comments. I am sure that someone more familiar with research design and methods could take issue with Kowalski's study. I thought it was of considerable value, however, because so far we have been crediting Obamacare for all the gains in coverage and all price increases, neither of which is entirely fair. This is at least a rigorous attempt to sort things out. Maybe a quixotic attempt, but it's one of the first ones I've seen try to do it in a sophisticated way.

  4. In addition to rewriting history, the paper (or at least your summary of it) ignores that Obamacare policies now must provide "essential health benefits". Maybe Mr Wall has always been insured in a group plan but even group plans had holes you could drive a truck through, like the Colts defensive line last night. Individual plans were even worse. So, when you come up with a study that factors that in, let me know, otherwise the numbers are garbage.

  5. You guys are absolutely right: Cummins should build a massive 80-story high rise, and give each employee 5 floors. Or, I suppose they could always rent out the top floors if they wanted, since downtown office space is bursting at the seams (http://www.ibj.com/article?articleId=49481).

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