Mortgage Fraud

U.S. sues Bank of America for $1B-plus in mortgage fraud

October 24, 2012
Associated Press
The top federal prosecutor in Manhattan sued Bank of America for more than $1 billion on Wednesday for mortgage fraud against Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac during the years around the financial crisis.
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Zionsville real estate schemer sentenced to 30 months

March 14, 2012
Kathleen McLaughlin
A Zionsville man who pushed real-estate investing schemes has been sentenced to 30 months in prison after pleading guilty to wire fraud and money laundering.
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Suit accuses Bank of America of fraud, racketeering

March 31, 2011
Scott Olson
The complaint, filed in Marion Superior Court, follows a similar suit that was dismissed in federal court. Bank of America and its Countrywide unit are accused of using perjured affidavits to foreclose on homes.
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Home Loan Bank sues over losses on $3B mortgage portfolio

November 18, 2010
Cory Schouten
The Federal Home Loan Bank of Indianapolis is suing some of the nation’s largest financial institutions to recover losses on a $3 billion portfolio of mortgage-backed securities.
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Ex-Indiana University player Leary pleads guilty in fraud

July 16, 2010
Associated Press
Todd Leary of Carmel pleaded guilty in court Thursday to a felony charge of misappropriating title insurance escrow funds. His agreement with prosecutors calls for him to face up to three years in prison, with that cut in half if he pays nearly $295,000 in restitution.
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Fraud scheme nets Indianapolis man 15 years in Texas

May 4, 2010
Louis Simpson bilked investors of $948,500 by claiming to operate a program with the Department of Housing and Urban Development.
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Four charged with income tax fraud

April 7, 2010
A business owner and three people allegedly involved in a large mortgage fraud scheme face prison sentences for failing to report income or file certain tax forms.
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Ex-investor sentenced in Indiana mortgage fraud

January 5, 2010
 IBJ Staff and Associated Press
Robert A. Penn, 44, of Naples, Fla., received seven years in prison and was ordered to pay more than $11 million in restitution.
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Local man gets 37 months in mortgage-fraud scheme

November 10, 2009
Cory Schouten
A federal judge has ordered an Indianapolis man to serve 37 months in prison and pay $1.7 million in restitution for his role in a massive mortgage fraud scheme.
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Noblesville man sentenced for mortgage fraud

July 9, 2009
 IBJ Staff
A Noblesville man was sentenced to one year of home detention yesterday after pleading guilty to mortgage fraud in federal court. Marvin G. Hampton also was ordered to pay $262,424.76 in restitution to three lending institutions.
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Lenders foreclose on at least 20 properties in mortgage schemeRestricted Content

October 20, 2008
Cory Schouten

Charter Homes recruited and paid buyers to take out inflated mortgages on dozens of central Indiana homes it built, promising to manage the properties as rentals and make payments for the owners, current and former Charter business partners say.


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SPECIAL REPORT: Charter Homes draws scrutiny for odd sales claims, multiple liens

August 25, 2008
Cory Schouten
Charter Homes owner Jerry Jaquess fancies himself a white knight for King Park, a neighborhood once known mainly for its rampant crime, boarded-up homes and vacant lots. But as he’s constructed a slew of homes and carriage houses there, the local builder has stirred up several lawsuits, dozens of liens and persistent questions about whether his business is legit.
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Regulators seek mortgage reformsRestricted Content

December 3, 2007
Peter Schnitzler
State regulators want more firepower to fight mortgage crimes. But a month before the General Assembly convenes, real estate interests are uneasy, fearing lawmakers may go overboard.
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  1. to mention the rest of Molly's experience- she served as Communications Director for the Indianapolis Department of Public Works and also did communications for the state. She's incredibly qualified for this role and has a real love for Indianapolis and Indiana. Best of luck to her!

  2. Shall we not demand the same scrutiny for law schools, med schools, heaven forbid, business schools, etc.? How many law school grads are servers? How many business start ups fail and how many business grads get low paying jobs because there are so few high paying positions available? Why does our legislature continue to demean public schools and give taxpayer dollars to charters and private schools, ($171 million last year), rather than investing in our community schools? We are on a course of disaster regarding our public school attitudes unless we change our thinking in a short time.

  3. I agree with the other reader's comment about the chunky tomato soup. I found myself wanting a breadstick to dip into it. It tasted more like a marinara sauce; I couldn't eat it as a soup. In general, I liked the place... but doubt that I'll frequent it once the novelty wears off.

  4. The Indiana toll road used to have some of the cleanest bathrooms you could find on the road. After the lease they went downhill quickly. While not the grossest you'll see, they hover a bit below average. Am not sure if this is indicative of the entire deal or merely a portion of it. But the goals of anyone taking over the lease will always be at odds. The fewer repairs they make, the more money they earn since they have a virtual monopoly on travel from Cleveland to Chicago. So they only comply to satisfy the rules. It's hard to hand public works over to private enterprise. The incentives are misaligned. In true competition, you'd have multiple roads, each build by different companies motivated to make theirs more attractive. Working to attract customers is very different than working to maximize profit on people who have no choice but to choose your road. Of course, we all know two roads would be even more ridiculous.

  5. The State is in a perfect position. The consortium overpaid for leasing the toll road. Good for the State. The money they paid is being used across the State to upgrade roads and bridges and employ people at at time most of the country is scrambling to fund basic repairs. Good for the State. Indiana taxpayers are no longer subsidizing the toll roads to the tune of millions a year as we had for the last 20 years because the legislature did not have the guts to raise tolls. Good for the State. If the consortium fails, they either find another operator, acceptable to the State, to buy them out or the road gets turned back over to the State and we keep the Billions. Good for the State. Pat Bauer is no longer the Majority or Minority Leader of the House. Good for the State. Anyway you look at this, the State received billions of dollars for an assett the taxpayers were subsidizing, the State does not have to pay to maintain the road for 70 years. I am having trouble seeing the downside.

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