National Bank of Indianapolis

Banks scrambling to find experienced workersRestricted Content

May 17, 2014
Chris O'Malley
Many banks let training languish in an era when consolidation made it easy to snap up veterans. Now, with boomers starting to retire, banks want to pass the baton smoothly.
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Spate of banking mergers may be just the beginningRestricted Content

May 18, 2013
Greg Andrews
First Merchants Corp. CEO Michael Rechin thinks a wave of bank mergers is coming—driven by financial institutions’ quest to increase profits in an environment where super-low interest rates continue to squeeze margins.
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Developer loses fraud appeal

December 28, 2012
Scott Olson
The Indiana Court of Appeals affirmed Christopher White's 2009 conviction, resulting from a $500,000 bad check he wrote as he tried to save his real estate development firm.
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Many banks still digging out from Great Recession traumaRestricted Content

October 13, 2012
The following statistics reflect performance of the 10 banks with the largest market shares in the Indianapolis Metropolitan Statistical Area.
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Banks' market rankings stable despite deposit shiftsRestricted Content

October 13, 2012
 IBJ Staff
BMO Harris and PNC lost some deposits, but the biggest local banks by market share remained the same.
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National Bank of Indianapolis exec retiring

August 31, 2011
Philip B. Roby, who helped start the city's largest locally based bank, will retire at the end of the year.
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Hentschel ramrodding KeyBank development in IndianapolisRestricted Content

October 16, 2010
Scott Olson
Exec adds branches, deposits, after completing a stint at a human-resources firm.
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New Indiana law aims to promote safety of traditional loansRestricted Content

May 22, 2010
Scott Olson
A new state program is encouraging lenders to promote the stability of their conventional mortgages to help Indiana's housing market rebound from a foreclosure crisis instigated by risky loans.
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FDIC fee hitting small banks particularly hardRestricted Content

October 3, 2009
Scott Olson
Fees imposed on U.S. banks to rebuild a Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. fund nearly depleted by scores of bank failures is expected to sap profits of small financial institutions. Community banks with less income than their larger counterparts are particularly at risk of having their 2009 earnings erased by the charges after an emergency fee on banks took effect June 30.
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Banks building new branches despite online ageRestricted Content

July 27, 2009
Marc D. Allan
Bank transaction counts—the number of people going into banks to make a deposit, cash a check or conduct some other form of business—have declined in recent years with the increased popularity of direct deposit, online banking and easy ATM accessibility. So why add branches?
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  1. John, unfortunately CTRWD wants to put the tank(s) right next to a nature preserve and at the southern entrance to Carmel off of Keystone. Not exactly the kind of message you want to send to residents and visitors (come see our tanks as you enter our city and we build stuff in nature preserves...

  2. 85 feet for an ambitious project? I could shoot ej*culate farther than that.

  3. I tried, can't take it anymore. Untill Katz is replaced I can't listen anymore.

  4. Perhaps, but they've had a very active program to reduce rainwater/sump pump inflows for a number of years. But you are correct that controlling these peak flows will require spending more money - surge tanks, lines or removing storm water inflow at the source.

  5. All sewage goes to the Carmel treatment plant on the White River at 96th St. Rainfall should not affect sewage flows, but somehow it does - and the increased rate is more than the plant can handle a few times each year. One big source is typically homeowners who have their sump pumps connect into the sanitary sewer line rather than to the storm sewer line or yard. So we (Carmel and Clay Twp) need someway to hold the excess flow for a few days until the plant can process this material. Carmel wants the surge tank located at the treatment plant but than means an expensive underground line has to be installed through residential areas while CTRWD wants the surge tank located further 'upstream' from the treatment plant which costs less. Either solution works from an environmental control perspective. The less expensive solution means some people would likely have an unsightly tank near them. Carmel wants the more expensive solution - surprise!

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