Newspapers

IU grads carve Greek-based niche in newsRestricted Content

June 19, 2010
Anthony Schoettle
What started with a casual meeting between two Indiana University students in a business class in 2008 has grown into an operation with projected revenue of $2 million this year. Despite long odds and little capital, Evan Burns and Adrian France launched a weekly print newspaper at IU last September.
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Former Star columnist suing newspaper

April 29, 2010
Scott Olson
Susan Guyett, who wrote the Talk of Our Town column, claims the newspaper discriminated against her on the basis of age when she was let go from her job in 2008.
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Star's union upset over newspaper's use of story

April 2, 2010
Scott Olson
A piece written by a reporter more than three years ago that was repackaged recently as part of an advertising supplement has drawn the ire of the paper's guild.
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IBJ honored for Simon and Durham stories, Web siteRestricted Content

March 27, 2010
IBJ received three national journalism awards at the Society of American Business Editors and Writers' annual conference March 20 in Phoenix.
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Regulatory job prompts Mays to resign as Recorder publisher

February 24, 2010
Carolene Mays plans to leave the Indianapolis newspaper after being named to the Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission.
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Union representing Indianapolis Star employees sues Gannett

February 20, 2010
 IBJ Staff
The 178-member union is suing to preserve its arbitration rights, and possibly win back the jobs of eight people who were let go last summer.
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IBJ Media president leaving after 30 years

February 12, 2010
Scott Olson
Chris Katterjohn told IBJ employees Friday morning that he would leave at the end of February. Katterjohn has spent 30 years with the firm, including the past 20 years as publisher of the company's flagship Indianapolis Business Journal.
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Editorial writers lose appeal against Star

December 9, 2009
Jennifer Nelson / The Indiana Lawyer
Two former editorial writers at Indiana's largest newspaper failed to prove they were the victims of religious discrimination, according to a circuit court of appeals.
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Sign proposed for IBJ building requires public hearing

November 7, 2009
 IBJ Staff
The parent company of Indianapolis Business Journal has filed plans to add a sign with an electronic-message component outside the newspaper’s headquarters at 41 E. Washington St.
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KATTERJOHN: Newspapers still deliver - for YOU

October 10, 2009
Chris Katterjohn
The Hoosier State Press Association, a trade group representing 175 paid-circulation Hoosier newspapers, including IBJ, has launched a campaign designed to remind the public of the important role newspapers play in our democracy. So this week, I’m ceding my space to David Stamps, executive director of the HSPA
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Kroger ads in Star grab attention, raise eyebrowsRestricted Content

October 10, 2009
Anthony Schoettle
A new eye-grabbing advertising design in The Indianapolis Star has some wondering where ad content stops and news content begins.
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Star biz columnist leaving to lead Indiana Fiscal Policy Institute

September 2, 2009
 IBJ Staff
Indianapolis Star business columnist John Ketzenberger is leaving the newspaper to become president of the Indiana Fiscal Policy Institute, the organization said today.
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Star union approves new 2-year contract

August 25, 2009
 IBJ Staff
The Indianapolis Newspaper Guild voted 56-45 today to ratify a new, two-year contract with the Gannett Co.-owned Indianapolis Star that includes a 10-percent pay cut and two-year wage freeze.
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Star union voting on new contract

August 25, 2009
Scott Olson
The Indianapolis Newspaper Guild plans to vote this afternoon on a new, two-year contract with the Gannett Co.-owned Indianapolis Star that includes a 10-percent pay cut and two-year wage freeze.
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IUPUI pumps up sports journalism assetsRestricted Content

June 1, 2009
The Associated Press Sports Editors, the nation's largest professional sports journalism organization, is establishing its headquarters at Indiana University's new National Sports Journalism Center.
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Civility is admired in life and deathRestricted Content

June 1, 2009
Mickey Maurer
What would you want said in your obituary that would set you apart from your peers?
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Journalism is the value propositionRestricted Content

May 25, 2009
Chris Katterjohn
The newspaper business isn't dying; it's morphing.
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The state of the newspaper industry is no joke; Star parent making money, but paper far from secureRestricted Content

May 18, 2009
Anthony Schoettle
Today, life without a daily newspaper isn't so farfetched.
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Will local paper keep covering your favorite team?Restricted Content

April 27, 2009
Bill Benner
As a (former full-time) ink-stained wretch, witnessing the demise of the daily newspaper is heartbreaking. I can't imagine a day without the "morning miracle" in my hands over a cup of coffee.
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How IBJ is surviving the recessionRestricted Content

April 27, 2009
Chris Katterjohn
This economy has been tough on just about everybody. No matter what your choice of media, you can't escape the news about companies and entire industries challenged by the recession. But what about the folks doing all that reporting?
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'Star' scales back on reviewing arts events, much to promoters' dismayRestricted Content

December 15, 2008
Kathleen McLaughlin
The Indianapolis Star, the state's largest daily newspaper, has scaled back its roster of critics in recent years — a reduction in coverage that put the onus on local arts promoters to get the word out through other channels, such as blogs.
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Star, other daily newspapers adapting to digital worldRestricted Content

April 14, 2008
Anthony Schoettle
The Indianapolis Star has launched an armada of initiatives to bolster revenue as it reacts to seismic industry changes, many driven by advertiser and reader flight to digital media. Daily newspapers--once one of the nation's most stable, profitable businesses--now face a rapidly changing marketplace that would make the most innovative business operator quiver.
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Newspaper war erupting in northern suburbsRestricted Content

September 18, 2006
Anthony Schoettle
Two new Carmel newspapers will soon join eight others in Boone and Hamilton counties. While the region is one of the fastest growing in Indiana, journalism experts said having 10 newspapers serving a population of just under 300,000 is astounding.
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  1. John, unfortunately CTRWD wants to put the tank(s) right next to a nature preserve and at the southern entrance to Carmel off of Keystone. Not exactly the kind of message you want to send to residents and visitors (come see our tanks as you enter our city and we build stuff in nature preserves...

  2. 85 feet for an ambitious project? I could shoot ej*culate farther than that.

  3. I tried, can't take it anymore. Untill Katz is replaced I can't listen anymore.

  4. Perhaps, but they've had a very active program to reduce rainwater/sump pump inflows for a number of years. But you are correct that controlling these peak flows will require spending more money - surge tanks, lines or removing storm water inflow at the source.

  5. All sewage goes to the Carmel treatment plant on the White River at 96th St. Rainfall should not affect sewage flows, but somehow it does - and the increased rate is more than the plant can handle a few times each year. One big source is typically homeowners who have their sump pumps connect into the sanitary sewer line rather than to the storm sewer line or yard. So we (Carmel and Clay Twp) need someway to hold the excess flow for a few days until the plant can process this material. Carmel wants the surge tank located at the treatment plant but than means an expensive underground line has to be installed through residential areas while CTRWD wants the surge tank located further 'upstream' from the treatment plant which costs less. Either solution works from an environmental control perspective. The less expensive solution means some people would likely have an unsightly tank near them. Carmel wants the more expensive solution - surprise!

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