Philanthropy

MacAllister awarded for service to community

November 17, 2008
Sam Stall
P.E. MacAllister has helped turn Indianapolis into a culturally vibrant city.
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Tonic Ball raises money for Second HelpingsRestricted Content

November 17, 2008
Marc D.
Tonic Ball — an annual fundraiser for Second Helpings — takes place the Friday before Thanksgiving, featuring 30 local bands each playing 10-minute themed sets and local artists selling their work.
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Monon Bell football game helps Julian CenterRestricted Content

November 17, 2008
In the weeks leading up to this year's big rivalry football game, Wabash College and DePauw University students held various fundraisers to benefit the Julian Center, as well as A-Way Home Shelter in Putnam County and the Family Crisis Shelter in Montgomery County.
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Ingersoll-Rand donates time, money to IPS 94Restricted Content

November 10, 2008
Kathleen McLaughlin

Ingersoll-Rand donated $35,000 worth of materials, $15,000 for engineering and labor, and future support  to IPS 94.

 

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Cultural Development Commission may lose millions used to promote Indianapolis artRestricted Content

November 10, 2008
Kathleen McLaughlin
A commission that has drawn $12.5 million in grants and public money to promote Indianapolis' artistic side is awaiting word on its future.
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Pay off debts, invest in education, enrich livesRestricted Content

November 3, 2008
Morton Marcus
In 2008, a Hoosier economist suggests consumers first pay off their debts, then invest in a liberal education and other causes that enrich lives.
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NFP of NOTE: Giving Sum

November 3, 2008
Giving Sum, an agency run by volunteers, holds monthly philanthropy leader lunches, and annually distributes $50,000, volunteer time and advocacy to promote social reform ideas.
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Recession takes its toll on charitiesRestricted Content

October 13, 2008
Kathleen McLaughlin

Area not-for-profits are beginning to feel the sting of the year-old credit crunch, which has escalated into a full-blown financial crisis that's battered investors and likely pushed the nation into recession.


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Education causes attract state foundations' support: Rate of giving outpaces national average 2-to-1Restricted Content

September 29, 2008
Andrea Muirragui
Nearly half the money Indiana foundations gave away in 2005 went to educational organizations-more than twice the rate of such giving nationally, according to a new study from Indiana University's Center on Philanthropy. All told, the state's independent, corporate and community foundations awarded $450 million in grants to support education, 47 percent of the $965 million total. Nationally, about 23 percent of foundation giving goes to education. "My intuition tells me ... foundations are making education a priority as the...
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Tough economy touching all industries, but some are hurting more than othersRestricted Content

September 22, 2008
Anthony Schoettle, Cory Schouten

Stock markets are falling, jobs are disappearing, and the outlook for the economy seems grim. Banks, real estate developers, retailers and manufacturers are taking the worst hits, but all types of businesses in central Indiana are hurting. From health care to technology, education to philanthropy, every industry is trying to take the setbacks in stride.


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Arts fund-raising model not embraced locallyRestricted Content

September 8, 2008
Sam Stall

These days, many Indianapolis arts organizations barely know where their next dollar will come from. But an innovative fund-raising model that's found success in other cities might provide that sorely needed cash. In Cincinnati, a venerable not-for-profit called the United Arts Fund, founded in 1927, stages an annual workplace campaign, then doles out the bountiful proceeds to local arts organizations.


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State prevention program helps Children's Bureau enter new areas, lift budgetRestricted Content

September 1, 2008
Andrea Muirragui Davis

Since its origins as the Widows and Orphans Asylum in 1851, the Children's Bureau has been working to fix broken families in Indianapolis. Now the local not-for-profit has expanded its reach into 37 Indiana counties--growing its budget 22 percent in the process. But the agency remains focused on Marion County, where it's building a $9.2 million service center at 16th and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. streets.


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Firm brings big-name help to small not-for-profits: Consultant will offer tiered Web-based advice to help keep its fees affordableRestricted Content

August 18, 2008
Jennifer Whitson
Some heavy hitters in the local not-forprofit consulting world have formed Achieve LLC, a company that will use the Internet to make high-end advice available to small and midsize charities. Its goal is to give organizations experiencing growing pains access to expert advice they usually can't afford. "The question was, how do you fill that void for smaller not-for-profits?" said coowner and Vice President Dave Sternberg, former associate director of the Fundraising School at Indiana University's Center on Philanthropy and...
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Firm brings big-name help to small not-for-profits: Consultant will offer tiered Web-based advice to help keep its fees affordableRestricted Content

August 18, 2008
Jennifer Whitson
Some heavy hitters in the local not-forprofit consulting world have formed Achieve LLC, a company that will use the Internet to make high-end advice available to small and midsize charities. Its goal is to give organizations experiencing growing pains access to expert advice they usually can't afford. "The question was, how do you fill that void for smaller not-for-profits?" said coowner and Vice President Dave Sternberg, former associate director of the Fundraising School at Indiana University's Center on Philanthropy and...
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NOTIONS: Bless the blogosphere, all praise social networkingRestricted Content

July 28, 2008
Bruce Hetrick
A few months ago, after considerable cajoling, my friend Erik convinced me to join yet another online social network. This one's called Smaller Indiana. It bills itself as "making people and ideas findable." So now, in addition to being "LinkedIn" with a few hundred of my friends and colleagues past and present, and in addition to being what BusinessWeek calls a "fogey on Facebook," I'm also a Smoosier-the moniker for Smaller Indiana members. No sooner had I become a Smoosier...
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Dry cleaner's fight against sons' rare disease could lead to other life-saving treatmentsRestricted Content

July 21, 2008
Anthony Schoettle
Nathan's Battle Foundation, led by Phil Milto--who has two sons afflicted with the disease--has evolved over 10 years into what Milto calls a not-for-profit biotech company that has raised money and guided research that resulted in a promising treatment for Batten disease. Now, some of the gene therapy techniques researchers developed are being applied to other disorders.
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Charitable giving becomes bigger part of event celebrationsRestricted Content

July 14, 2008
Jennifer Whitson
Kathryn Morgan and Richard Cimera met at a dog park in Greenwood, where Cimera's basset hound won over Morgan's shy Labrador and boxer mix. And the owners soon followed suit, dating and then marrying on June 13. When the Greenwood couple planned their wedding, they wanted a way to share a bit of their happiness. So, in lieu of party favors, they made a donation to an animal-welfare organization.
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IRS requires not-for-profits to disclose more info: Organizations gearing up for new rules in 2009Restricted Content

June 2, 2008
Jennifer Whitson
For the first time in decades, the Internal Revenue Service is making a major revision to the way not-for-profits disclose information about their finances, governance and operations. Coming in the wake of scrutiny from federal lawmakers and regulators alike, the changes to IRS Form 990 that take effect next year require not-for-profit leaders to provide more information on executive compensation and potential conflicts of interest, for example. And for the first time ever, most organizations will be required to file...
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Wheeler Mission backers to kick off fund drive: Push to address building needs, ease financial strainRestricted Content

May 12, 2008
Jennifer Whitson
In February, Indianapolis' Wheeler Mission Ministries cut non-residential programming to stave off a budget shortfall as donations flat-lined and more homeless people came through its doors. Now the mission is facing more tough times, projecting as much as a $500,000 shortfall for the fiscal year that begins June 1. To help close the gap, supporters are kicking off Operation Restoration, a fund drive they hope will raise $11 million to help the mission expand, pay building debts, and build a...
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Zoobilation sells out fast despite $200-plus admissionRestricted Content

May 5, 2008
Jennifer Whitson
Far from the typical rubber-chicken fund-raiser attended mostly by board members and their friends--Zoobilation, the 22-year-old, annual black-tie fund-raiser for the Indianapolis Zoo--attracts 4,300 ticket holders eager to spend an evening wining and dining at the zoo.
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Colts, God license plates slice into sales of charity tagsRestricted Content

April 7, 2008
Chris O'Malley
Sales of specialty license plates benefiting colleges, not-for-profits and other Indiana organizations fell by nearly a third last year after the state unveiled "In God We Trust" tags as a free alternative to the lime-green pastoral fields plates reviled by many motorists.
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VIEWPOINT: 'Buy local' should be rallying cryRestricted Content

April 7, 2008
Brian Sullivan
In recent months, our governor and mayors across the state proudly have announced business developments and out-of-state companies' plans to expand or relocate in Indiana. They've worked overtime to earn these economic boosts, and they're to be congrat ulated for helping bolster the state and local economy. But we're ignoring a simple strategy that could yield many more high-paying jobs: Buy local. Here's the irony: Pursuing this strategy doesn't have to cost a dime. No recruiting trips to China, no...
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ECONOMIC ANALYSIS: Talk of corporate greed falls flat with this economistRestricted Content

March 31, 2008
Mike Hicks
It is an election year again, and talk of corporate greed, that stalwart in the lexicon of electioneering, once again fills the airwaves. An economics columnist usually wouldn't write about matters of sin. But attacks on greed always seem to have a policy message attached, and that is a big problem for all of us. Formally, corporations cannot be greedy. Corporations, not being human, cannot feel the weight of sin and so do not exhibit greed any more than they...
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Charities are feeling pain of gas price spike: Groups scrambling for volunteers, dollars to beef up transportationRestricted Content

March 31, 2008
Jennifer Whitson
With gas prices on the rise-and expected to reach $4 a gallon this summer-local not-for-profits are losing volunteers and throwing money at skyrocketing transportation budgets. Indianapolis Meals on Wheels Inc. Executive Director Barb Morris is used to fielding calls from reporters whenever gas prices fluctuate. In the past, she quashed their theory that high prices at the pump drove away volunteers. Not now, though. "If you'd asked me four or five months ago, I would have said, 'Absolutely not,'" Morris...
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Commentary: Indiana needs social entrepreneurshipRestricted Content

February 11, 2008
Brian Williams
In the Middle Ages, the French coined a new word that today we would identify as "undertake." Around 1828, this old French word, "entreprendre" was absorbed into the English language and after some use and m o d i fi c a t i o n s became a word we recognize and vener ate in our society today ... entrepreneur. As a nation founded and populated by men and women who risked life and fortune to reach our shores,...
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  1. PJ - Mall operators like Simon, and most developers/ land owners, establish individual legal entities for each property to avoid having a problem location sink the ship, or simply structure the note to exclude anything but the property acting as collateral. Usually both. The big banks that lend are big boys that know the risks and aren't mad at Simon for forking over the deed and walking away.

  2. Do any of the East side residence think that Macy, JC Penny's and the other national tenants would have letft the mall if they were making money?? I have read several post about how Simon neglected the property but it sounds like the Eastsiders stopped shopping at the mall even when it was full with all of the national retailers that you want to come back to the mall. I used to work at the Dick's at Washington Square and I know for a fact it's the worst performing Dick's in the Indianapolis market. You better start shopping there before it closes also.

  3. How can any company that has the cash and other assets be allowed to simply foreclose and not pay the debt? Simon, pay the debt and sell the property yourself. Don't just stiff the bank with the loan and require them to find a buyer.

  4. If you only knew....

  5. The proposal is structured in such a way that a private company (who has competitors in the marketplace) has struck a deal to get "financing" through utility ratepayers via IPL. Competitors to BlueIndy are at disadvantage now. The story isn't "how green can we be" but how creative "financing" through captive ratepayers benefits a company whose proposal should sink or float in the competitive marketplace without customer funding. If it was a great idea there would be financing available. IBJ needs to be doing a story on the utility ratemaking piece of this (which is pretty complicated) but instead it suggests that folks are whining about paying for being green.

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