Philanthropy

Chase donating gifts it hopes will be noticedRestricted Content

July 23, 2007
Chris O'Malley
Not-for-profits that banked on consistent support from the banker down the street can no longer count on a tip of the top hat, thanks to ever-larger mergers among institutions that have changed the dynamic of their charitable giving.
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Charities face more empty leadership chairsRestricted Content

July 9, 2007
Chris O'Malley
Only 29 percent of executives have discussed a transition plan with their boards, according to a study by San Francisco-based CompassPoint Nonprofit Services. Converging with this lack of preparedness is an approaching deficit of leaders.
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Philanthropy center busting assumptions: Institute's research shows there's still much to learnRestricted Content

June 18, 2007
Chris O\'malley
The Center on Philanthropy at Indiana University plans to share more of its prolific research through two new courses to be tested this fall in Indianapolis, and launched here and elsewhere next spring. Both new courses, including one on the dynamics of women's giving, could be a gold mine for perpetually prospecting not-for-profits-and for wealth advisers and wealth managers. "We're hoping there could be some niches we can carve out in this area. There's a great thirst for knowledge," said...
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Gorilla exhibit to be one of nation's largest: Apes and new oceans area designed to boost attendance, conservationRestricted Content

May 28, 2007
Jennifer Whitson
Fresh off the debut of a $9.5 million Oceans exhibit, the Indianapolis Zoo is already laying the groundwork for its next blockbuster. But it may come with a beastly price tag. A gorilla and bonobo habitat scheduled to open in 2013 is expected to cost tens of millions of dollars. "I can't tell you if this is a $30 million project or a $50 million project," said Indianapolis Zoo President Michael Crowther. "What I can tell you is that we're...
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Not-for-profit thrift stores shake low-end imageRestricted Content

May 7, 2007
Lisa Gerstner
Thrifty Threads store manager Tim Waldrip can hardly keep up when he puts stylish used clothes on the thrift store's mannequins. Customers snag them so quickly he has to change the outfits three to four times a day. Regardless of what its mannequins are wearing, the not-forprofit shop on West 86th Street is flourishing. Sales in 2006 reached $336,000-a 24-percent increase from the previous year. Now the Julian Center, the Indianapolis shelter for abused women that runs Thrifty Threads, is...
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Charity sees hope in Third World 'micro' lendingRestricted Content

April 30, 2007
Chris O'Malley
In the village of Armenia, in western El Salvador, the Barahona Bautista family last month got a $246 loan to start a pig farm from Ambassadors for Children. Micro loans are new to Ambassadors, which assists children in more than a dozen countries.
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LESSONS LEARNED: 'GIVE BACK'ANDY MEDLEY AND SCOTT HILL co-owners, CIK Enterprises LLCRestricted Content

April 30, 2007
-Andrea Muirragui
Small-business owners have plenty on their plates-like finding customers and keeping them happy. But CIK Enterprises partners Scott Hill and Andy Medley have found room for a heaping helping of generosity, too. The west-side direct marketing firm has a program in place that directs 1 percent of monthly profit to local charities, a seemingly small number that nevertheless is growing along with the 7-year-old company. That's the idea. "Capitalism has a negative connotation as something that's profitdriven and cut-throat," Medley...
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DOING GOOD: LINDSAY CORNELIUS: MBA student emerging as philanthropic leaderRestricted Content

April 23, 2007
Judith Cebula
DOING GOOD LINDSAY CORNELIUS MBA student emerging as philanthropic leader To hear Lindsay Cornelius tell it, Indianapolis is the best place to live: It's a growing city, with terrific new restaurants, fabulous art galleries, great parks, excellent museums, hip clubs and a booming downtown. But like any major metropoli tan area, it has its problems. And that has Cornelius, 26, determined to be among the legions of young men and women who care deeply about things like quality schools and...
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IU alum selling rare Neiman collectionRestricted Content

April 23, 2007
Anthony Schoettle
Indianapolis businessman Barton Kaufman is auctioning off 26 paintings by notable New York artist LeRoy Neiman. Kaufman plans to donate the money to Indiana University, where he earned an undergraduate degree in 1962 and law degree in 1965.
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Please pass the popcorn - and the cash: Not-for-profits hope film encourages more donationsRestricted Content

March 5, 2007
Chris O\'malley
But can a movie to be released March 9, "The Ultimate Gift," inspire the masses to give money to charitable groups? Not-for-profits hope so, although the idea that an emotion-driven Hollywood film can translate into a thoughtful and deliberate giving plan remains to be seen. "Donor education is a very difficult thing to get done. This may be a good start," said Gene Tempel, executive director of the IU Center on Philanthropy. The movie is based on the book of...
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Not-for-profits grow as college students take hands-on approachRestricted Content

February 19, 2007
Lisa Gerstner
Indianapolis not-for-profits are growing as more universities embrace service learning--an educational approach that encourages students to incorporate academics into community service.
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Charities struggle to cultivate donorsRestricted Content

January 22, 2007
Tammy Lieber
Attracting people under 40 with money to give is one of the latest challenges faced by not-for-profit organizations. As fund-raisers look toward cultivating the next generation of supporters, they see a younger generation that appears less inclined to do so.
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Program to offer cyber help for charities: IUPUI initiative creates database of consultantsRestricted Content

January 8, 2007
Tom Murphy
The IUPUI Solution Center soon will expand into cyberspace, launching a free Web site not-for-profits can use to network and find consultants. Its new Nonprofit Solutions Initiative will run the site and provide a database of consultants grouped by 25 areas of expertise. The site also will offer advice on how to work with them. The Solution Center, launched in 2003 with the help of a Lilly Endowment Inc. grant, helps bolster small businesses and not-for-profits. The new initiative, which...
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More givers asking not-for-profits to meet goals before getting donationsRestricted Content

December 18, 2006
Jennifer Whitson
Restricted gifts have long been common among foundations and corporate funders, but now individuals are getting into the act, too. Experts say more donors are attaching conditions to their contributions to encourage the recipient to push itself to achieve.
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From blankets to burials, trustee work never ends:Restricted Content

November 20, 2006
-Tom Murphy
You can turn to a township trustee for help if a fire leaves you homeless or a hospital stay leaves you penniless. You also look to the office if a dog devours your livestock or you need a fence dispute resolved. Indiana's 1,008 trustees make up the state's largest single group of elected officials, and their lengthy list of duties ranges from the conventional to the odd. Some are charged with destroying "noxious weeds" and "rank vegetation," according to the...
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Some say Wheeler Mission hurts neighborhood's potentialRestricted Content

November 6, 2006
Jennifer Whitson
A fall merger of two Indianapolis homeless shelters set off a new round of speculation about whether Wheeler Mission Ministries Inc. will continue to operate out of its 245 N. Delaware St. location--a stone's throw from multimillion-dollar redevelopment under way on Massachusetts Avenue.
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Obstacles couldn't stop community-minded ShaheenRestricted Content

November 6, 2006
Tammy Lieber
Yvonne Shaheen, retired CEO of Long Electric Co., is the winner of the 2006 Michael A. Carroll award, given annually in memory of the former deputy mayor to a person who embodies determination, devotion, humility and community.
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Riverview, Irsay take separate paths to exotic getaways: Nancy's Retreat organizers start dueling eventsRestricted Content

September 25, 2006
Tom Murphy
One retreat tempts central Indiana women to "capture their dreams"-and grab a makeover while they're at it-during a long weekend in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico. The other promises "a trip of a lifetime" in nearby Nuevo Vallarta. Last year, a hurricane swept away plans for the second annual Nancy's Retreat getaway, which was created by Nancy Irsay and the Riverview Memorial Foundation. This year, different visions split the retreat in two and created competing trips that benefit separate charities. Neither side...
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NOTIONS: Dear philanthropist: Make me a daydream believerRestricted Content

September 18, 2006
Bruce Hetrick
Last month, I picked up my boys in Fort Wayne, drove north on Interstate 69, hooked a left at Interstate 94, and got off at the Portage, Mich., exit. There, we whiled away the weekend at a family reunion. The grownups ate too much, caught up on gossip and puttered around the lake in the speedboat. The teenagers, whom we rarely saw, did X-Box battle in the basement. On Sunday, after the kids had surfaced for lunch and the grandparents...
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Charities reap aid, confusion from new federal law: Pension Protection Act opens new avenues for givingRestricted Content

September 4, 2006
Tom Murphy
A new law signed last month by President Bush should open the valves to a fresh stream of charitable giving by allowing people to make tax-free donations from their IRAs for the first time. But philanthropy insiders say that, while the law gave, it also hath taken away. The Pension Protection Act encourages contributions from individual retirement accounts, but it crimps the use of popular donor-advised funds, which allow donors to maintain some control over how their contributions are spent....
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High-profile, high-dollar gifts put Fairbanks Foundation among philanthropic eliteRestricted Content

August 21, 2006
Victoria D. Williams
The charitable organization awarded 84 grants totaling nearly $22 million in 2005. Already this year, it has announced another $24.5 million in high-profile, high-dollar gifts that will ensure the Fairbanks name isn't forgotten.
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Giving lifted by disasters: Donors generous to victims of catastrophies but didn't forget usual causes, IU study findsRestricted Content

June 19, 2006
Tracy Donhardt
All told, individuals, corporations and foundations gave $260.3 billion to charity in 2005, 2.7 percent more than the year before even after adjusting for inflation, according to data compiled by researchers at Indiana University's Center on Philanthropy for the annual "Giving USA" report. The report, set to be released June 19 by the Illinois-based Giving USA Foundation, answers a question that has been lingering for more than a year: Would the nation's outpouring of support for victims of an Asian...
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Site gets people involved: Institute uses Web to link volunteers with opportunitiesRestricted Content

June 19, 2006
Scott Olson
When Roger Williams began approaching local not-for-profits early this year about his idea to post their volunteer opportunities for teen-agers on his Web site, many were skeptical. "What's this guy trying to sell me?" they wondered. But six months after launching www.helpindyonline.com, part of his larger Emergent Leadership Institute, Williams has more than 80 charities promoting nearly 300 positions on his site for high school and college students interested in volunteering. The 36-year-old Carmel native and former youth pastor founded...
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Gladish strengthening his ties to Indianapolis: Ex-YMCA president joins IU's Center on PhilanthropyRestricted Content

June 19, 2006
Victoria D.
Kenneth Gladish first laced up his sneakers as a YMCA kid in Northbrook, Ill. Decades later, he tightened his tie as president of the national organization. In between, Gladish was a central figure in the Indianapolis charitable sector. Now his time at the YMCA of the USA has come to an end, and Gladish's next step is up in the air. But one thing's for sure-he'll be maintaining his ties to Indianapolis. Gladish, 53, has accepted a three-year appointment as...
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In midst of sale, Marsh rolling out new slogan: Grocer says it's the place to 'Treat your family well'Restricted Content

June 12, 2006
Matthew Kish
Executives at Fishers-based Marsh Supermarkets Inc. aren't sitting on their hands, despite signing an offer a little more than a month ago to sell the grocery chain to a private equity group in Florida. For the past two years, they've been scratching away on flip charts coming up with a new brand. And they figure they might as well put it to use. They launched the new identity last month with the help of Dallas-based Ivie & Associates Inc., an...
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  1. With Pence running the ship good luck with a new government building on the site. He does everything on the cheap except unnecessary roads line a new beltway( like we need that). Things like state of the art office buildings and light rail will never be seen as an asset to these types. They don't get that these are the things that help a city prosper.

  2. Does the $100,000,000,000 include salaries for members of Congress?

  3. "But that doesn't change how the piece plays to most of the people who will see it." If it stands out so little during the day as you seem to suggest maybe most of the people who actually see it will be those present when it is dark enough to experience its full effects.

  4. That's the mentality of most retail marketers. In this case Leo was asked to build the brand. HHG then had a bad sales quarter and rather than stay the course, now want to go back to the schlock that Zimmerman provides (at a considerable cut in price.) And while HHG salesmen are, by far, the pushiest salesmen I have ever experienced, I believe they are NOT paid on commission. But that doesn't mean they aren't trained to be aggressive.

  5. The reason HHG's sales team hits you from the moment you walk through the door is the same reason car salesmen do the same thing: Commission. HHG's folks are paid by commission they and need to hit sales targets or get cut, while BB does not. The sales figures are aggressive, so turnover rate is high. Electronics are the largest commission earners along with non-needed warranties, service plans etc, known in the industry as 'cheese'. The wholesale base price is listed on the cryptic price tag in the string of numbers near the bar code. Know how to decipher it and you get things at cost, with little to no commission to the sales persons. Whether or not this is fair, is more of a moral question than a financial one.

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