Philanthropy

Site gets people involved: Institute uses Web to link volunteers with opportunitiesRestricted Content

June 19, 2006
Scott Olson
When Roger Williams began approaching local not-for-profits early this year about his idea to post their volunteer opportunities for teen-agers on his Web site, many were skeptical. "What's this guy trying to sell me?" they wondered. But six months after launching www.helpindyonline.com, part of his larger Emergent Leadership Institute, Williams has more than 80 charities promoting nearly 300 positions on his site for high school and college students interested in volunteering. The 36-year-old Carmel native and former youth pastor founded...
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Gladish strengthening his ties to Indianapolis: Ex-YMCA president joins IU's Center on PhilanthropyRestricted Content

June 19, 2006
Victoria D.
Kenneth Gladish first laced up his sneakers as a YMCA kid in Northbrook, Ill. Decades later, he tightened his tie as president of the national organization. In between, Gladish was a central figure in the Indianapolis charitable sector. Now his time at the YMCA of the USA has come to an end, and Gladish's next step is up in the air. But one thing's for sure-he'll be maintaining his ties to Indianapolis. Gladish, 53, has accepted a three-year appointment as...
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In midst of sale, Marsh rolling out new slogan: Grocer says it's the place to 'Treat your family well'Restricted Content

June 12, 2006
Matthew Kish
Executives at Fishers-based Marsh Supermarkets Inc. aren't sitting on their hands, despite signing an offer a little more than a month ago to sell the grocery chain to a private equity group in Florida. For the past two years, they've been scratching away on flip charts coming up with a new brand. And they figure they might as well put it to use. They launched the new identity last month with the help of Dallas-based Ivie & Associates Inc., an...
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Banks enroll to help educators: As Indiana falls behind, financial literacy programs blossomRestricted Content

May 15, 2006
Matthew Kish
Their answer: a need. As in, one cannot exist without food, shelter and a $175 pair of sneakers. While the marketing folks at Nike would smile at the association, it makes personal finance experts like Avery cringe. They say it's another example of an alarming level of financial ignorance that has allowed nationwide consumer debt to zoom past $2 trillion. And the pain is especially acute in Indiana. "You don't have to look far beyond the bankruptcy and foreclosure statistics...
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Paid boards spur not-for-profit debate: Critics: If directors won't give time, who will?Restricted Content

April 17, 2006
Andrea Muirragui
Indianapolis-based USA Funds is a large, complex organization, and members of its governing board are busy people. Same goes for the NCAA, another local not-for-profit with a national reach, a nine-figure budget and directors who are anything but professional volunteers. The two organizations have one key difference, though: USA Funds pays its board members. The NCAA does not. "It's simply the nature of the world," said Norm Lefstein, an Indiana University law professor who chairs the compensation committee at student-loan...
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Tax forms not dependable as only source of NFP data:Restricted Content

April 10, 2006
Andrea Muirragui
Not-for-profit organizations' tax filings can provide a wealth of information, from big-picture data like annual revenue and expenses to nitty-gritty details, including the CEO's salary. But drawing conclusions-or trying to compare organizations-based only on the IRS Form 990 is difficult at best. First off, not all tax-exempt organizations are required to file tax returns. Groups with less than $25,000 in annual revenue are exempt from filing, as are all churches and many other religious institutions. And among those that do...
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COMPEN$ATION CLASH: Complexity boosts not-for-profit pay, but should work be its own reward?Restricted Content

April 10, 2006
Andrea Muirragui
At least two large Indianapolis not-for-profits have been investigated-and cleared-as part of an Internal Revenue Service examination of compensation practices at tax-exempt organizations. Preliminary results of the nationwide inquiry aren't expected until fall, but the scrutiny already has increased the volume in an ongoing debate over how not-for-profit executives should be paid. Some observers have called for setting limits on not-for-profit compensation, citing the charitable nature of the work. Others insist sixor seven-figure pay packages are not out of line...
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Cream, sugar, social awareness: Fair-trade coffee firm looks beyond profitsRestricted Content

February 27, 2006
Matthew Kish
When one considers the new company pays about 40 percent more for its raw product than do its non-fairtrade competitors-and it gives roughly $1 from every bag it sells back to the farmers who produce the coffee beans-it might seem like the McLeans are destined for drinking macchiatos in the poorhouse. But the couple didn't build Advance Interface Solutions into a successful business by accident. And Beans for Better Life, their foray into the cappuccino craze, is hardly reckless. Local...
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VIEWPOINT: Follow 3 C's of strategic charitable givingRestricted Content

December 19, 2005
Brian Payne
You do your best every day to make smart decisions about how you and your family members spend money. You know a haphazard approach to your personal finances isn't efficient or effective, and you rely on common sense and planning to help you make smart spending decisions. I suggest you apply that thoughtful approach to your charitable giving, whether you're a veteran philanthropist or someone who seldom does more than throw a few coins in a kettle. In fact, I...
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ERODING FOUNDATION: Endowment's assets fall with Lilly stock; heavy sale of shares dim chances for reboundRestricted Content

December 12, 2005
Scott Olson
Endowment's assets fall with Lilly stock; heavy sale of shares dim chances for rebound Wall Street is chipping away at Indianapolis' most-venerable philanthropic institution. The value of Lilly Endowment's primary asset-Eli Lilly and Co. shares-has dropped by more than half since 2000, forcing leaders to sell additional shares in order to give away hundreds of millions of dollars as required each year. Still, the privately run endowment remains a major Eli Lilly shareholder, with nearly 148 million shares of the company's...
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Rallying around charity: Local event teaches next generation the value of givingRestricted Content

November 21, 2005
Tracy Donhardt
Woodard's two eldest children, Taylor and T.J., check in new arrivals as other family members slap vinyl decals on the cars lining up along Bearcat Alley for this year's Van Riper Woodard Family Foundation charity road rally. Finally, at precisely 8:56 a.m., Woodard waves the green flag for the team from public broadcaster WFYI, which drew the pole position. The other teams depart one by one, every 60 seconds. For the next eight hours, the competitors will make their way...
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Utility fund-raising effort takes heat for opt-out strategy: Critics say customers should be asked if they want to contribute to Operation Round Up-or any charityRestricted Content

October 3, 2005
Andrea Muirragui
The concept is a noble one: By rounding their bills up to the nearest dollar, utility customers can turn pennies into a philanthropic windfall for a worthy cause. Indeed, Operation Round Up programs at nearly 250 electric cooperatives nationwide-including 22 in Indiana-have collected more than $50 million for charity since the fund-raising effort began in 1989. But some observers question the method most participating utilities use to get their members involved. Rather than being asked to give, residential and commercial...
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Givers should be smart as well as generous, experts say: Do your homework before donating to any causeRestricted Content

September 26, 2005
Ed Callahan
Charitable giving often is a spur-of-themoment thing, particularly if it's a response to a disaster. Still, charitable groups, relief agencies and financial advisers say a little thought before making a donation is a good idea. Giant disasters such as Hurricane Katrina jolt many people into trying to help, often with no particular idea beyond simply doing something. However, some types of help are more helpful than others. Properly following the rules of charitable giving can provide a tax benefit. It...
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Indianapolis responds to Katrina devastation:Restricted Content

September 5, 2005
Andrea Muirragui
Local philanthropic response to the epic disaster was almost immediate. Television and radio stations alike urged central Indiana audiences to make donations at dozens of collection sites, and the Salvation Army's Indiana Division broke out its red kettles to help. The corporate community also responded. Gifts made by IBJ's deadline include: Indianapolis-based Eli Lilly and Co. said it will contribute $1 million to the American Red Cross and match all contributions made by its U.S. employees. Lilly also will give...
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More not-for-profits try for-profit ventures ______: Mission, not money, should be motivation, observers sayRestricted Content

July 25, 2005
Andrea Muirragui
Finding money for the agency's burgeoning hunger-relief and job-training programs was difficult, and additional growth would only add to the challenge. So leaders asked themselves an increasingly common question: "What else can we do?" And like a growing number of its not-forprofit peers in Indianapolis and elsewhere, Second Helpings thinks it has the answer in a for-profit venture. Using part of a $250,000 grant from Lilly Endowment Inc. and the expertise developed in seven years of preparing and delivering meals...
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Scammer targets local trust: E-mail scheme seeks data from Pulliam grant recipientsRestricted Content

July 18, 2005
Andrea Muirragui
An Internet scammer borrowed the identity of a high-profile local foundation this month, blasting out an error-riddled e-mail message that solicited personal information from former grant recipients. Leaders of the Nina Mason Pulliam Charitable Trust responded by sending its own e-mail to all 2,400 individuals on its electronic contact list, instructing them to disregard the fake missive that promised a $2.5 million grant. Fallout from the so-called phishing attack appears to be minimal so far, trust CEO Harriet M. Ivey...
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Employers promoting fitness: To battle steep insurance costs, businesses help employees get healthierRestricted Content

July 11, 2005
Julie Goldsmith
Wearing a pedometer, Kelly Dircksen treads 2,000 or so steps a day at the office, racking up her highest counts in her treks to the photocopier. Her 2-1/2-mile daily goal entails after-work walks, as well. The 34-year-old quoting specialist said her company pays 50 percent of any fitness-related costs for her and her family, including a Weight Watchers program, running shoes for her kids, and the entry fee for her son's marathon. "I'm definitely healthier," said Dircksen, who celebrates incremental...
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State plays wait, see: Indiana likely to follow federal lead regarding oversight of charitiesRestricted Content

July 4, 2005
Andrea Muirragui
As the national conversation about improving not-for-profit oversight gains volume, Indiana's top charity watchdog is tuning in-while he considers whether to join the cacophony. Attorney General Steve Carter convened an informal group of advisers to weigh in on the topic last year, ultimately pushing for changes in state law that give him more ways to deal with abuses in the sector. Now he's content to let federal efforts play out before determining what more can be done to keep the...
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Charitable sector rides on road to recovery: Giving makes big jump for the first time since 2000Restricted Content

June 20, 2005
Andrea Muirragui
Americans gave more money to charity last year than ever before, signaling a return to the pre-9/11 philanthropic heyday. Contributions were up 5 percent, to $248.5 billion-the first significant increase after adjusting for inflation since 2000. "Things have been kind of flat," said Eugene Tempel, executive director at the Center on Philanthropy at Indiana University. "This ... tells us things are getting a little stronger. This is a good sign." Researchers at the center compile data each year and write...
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TAKING A GAMBLE: Charity poker fund-raisers risk running afoul of the lawRestricted Content

June 13, 2005
Andrea Muirragui
When it comes to charity poker in Indiana, players and organizers alike need to know more than when to hold 'em and when to fold 'em. They also need to know whether they're walking-or running-away from a legal game. Poker's growing popularity has given rise to a veritable jackpot for aficionados nationwide. In Indiana, where wagering is only allowed at state-sanctioned riverboat casinos, many of those who want more than a home game are finding action at tournaments that benefit...
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Women's group aims to pool philanthropic resources: High hopes for first year: two $125,000 grants to local charitiesRestricted Content

June 6, 2005
Andrea Muirragui
They want to make a difference-a significant, six-figure difference in a world where progress often comes $100 at a time. By this time next year, the dozen women at the core of a new philanthropic effort hope to have found 100 or more like-minded individuals willing to open their hearts and their checkbooks to help the central Indiana community. Modeled after similar initiatives in Cincinnati and Pensacola, Fla., the idea behind Impact 100 Greater Indianapolis is simple enough: get 100...
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Not-for-profits affect state's bottom line: Health organizations account for more than half of state's not-for-profit workersRestricted Content

June 6, 2005
Tracy Donhardtreporter
From 2000 to 2003, a period during which the state experienced an overall decline in jobs, employment in the notfor-profit sector grew. That finding, among others, is part of a study of not-for-profit employment in the state, and an update of a report issued two years ago, by Indiana University's Center on Philanthropy, IU's School of Public and Environmental Affairs, and Johns Hopkins University. The 5-percent increase in not-for-profit employment, compared with a 6-percent decline in the for-profit sector, suggests...
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Not-for-profit looks for way to continue its operations: Broad support must replace CILC's sole funding sourceRestricted Content

May 30, 2005
Andrea Muirragui
It was supposed to be short-lived, an agency created solely to help Indiana schools tap emerging videoconferencing technology for distance learning. But a funny thing happened on the way to the virtual field trip. "We found it really wasn't about the technology. It was about what you do with the technology," said Ruth Blankenbaker, executive director of the Indianapolis-based Center for Interactive Learning and Collaboration. "If you don't have a reason to use it, what's the point?" Teachers had to...
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HIGHER (cost of) EDUCATION: Students' college burden continues to rise in IndianaRestricted Content

May 23, 2005
Andrea Muirragui
With state funding flat and operating expenses rising, Indiana's public universities are turning to a familiar source to make up the difference-students. Tuition and mandatory fees at state institutions are set to climb an average of 5 percent next school year and higher in 2006-2007, if proposed rates stand. That's a far cry from the double-digit increases most universities imposed just a few years ago, but observers say it's worrisome nonetheless. "Tuition has been rising at twice the rate of...
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Mission to Mexico to promote business: City officials, corporate leaders to take part in tripRestricted Content

April 18, 2005
Katie Maurer
Most Hoosiers visiting Mexico spend their time on the beaches of Cancun, Cabo San Lucas or Puerto Vallarta. But this fall, an excursion of a different kind will take local business and civic leaders south of the border to explore new opportunities for commerce and trade with Mexico. The week-long mission, scheduled for early September, is the brainchild of Sergio Aguilera, Mexico's consul general for Indianapolis. He hopes that exposing Hoosiers to all facets of Mexican life-from government and the...
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  1. Those of you yelling to deport them all should at least understand that the law allows minors (if not from a bordering country) to argue for asylum. If you don't like the law, you can petition Congress to change it. But you can't blindly scream that they all need to be deported now, unless you want your government to just decide which laws to follow and which to ignore.

  2. 52,000 children in a country with a population of nearly 300 million is decimal dust or a nano-amount of people that can be easily absorbed. In addition, the flow of children from central American countries is decreasing. BL - the country can easily absorb these children while at the same time trying to discourage more children from coming. There is tension between economic concerns and the values of Judeo-Christian believers. But, I cannot see how the economic argument can stand up against the values of the believers, which most people in this country espouse (but perhaps don't practice). The Governor, who is an alleged religious man and a family man, seems to favor the economic argument; I do not see how his position is tenable under the circumstances. Yes, this is a complicated situation made worse by politics but....these are helpless children without parents and many want to simply "ship" them back to who knows where. Where are our Hoosier hearts? I thought the term Hoosier was synonymous with hospitable.

  3. Illegal aliens. Not undocumented workers (too young anyway). I note that this article never uses the word illegal and calls them immigrants. Being married to a naturalized citizen, these people are criminals and need to be deported as soon as humanly possible. The border needs to be closed NOW.

  4. Send them back NOW.

  5. deport now

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