Quarterly commercial real estate stats

First-quarter commercial real estate statistics for IndianapolisRestricted Content

May 3, 2014
Check out the latest office and industrial statistics.
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Indianapolis office market shows rise in occupancy

April 17, 2014
 IBJ Staff
The improvement was sparked by growing occupancy in the suburban office market, where the vacancy rate fell from 20.3 percent to 18.2 percent.
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Brokers trying to reverse vacancy in downtown Indy officesRestricted Content

March 8, 2014
Scott Olson
The vacancy rate for Class A space approached 20 percent in 2011 for the first time in at least 15 years and kept trending upward, settling at 21.4 percent at the end of last year.
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Fourth-quarter 2012 commercial real estate statistics for IndianapolisRestricted Content

September 21, 2013
Commercial Real Estate Focus sections include statistical snapshots of Indianapolis' multi-tenant office vacancy rates and the local industrial market.
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Northern office market on upswing, downtown ‘stagnant’

July 16, 2013
Scott Olson
Downtown's vacancy rate continues to hover around 20 percent, according to mid-year market reports, with more space becoming available than was leased. Meanwhile, the northern suburban market is showing the most improvement.
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First-quarter commercial real estate statistics for IndianapolisRestricted Content

May 4, 2013
Commercial Real Estate Focus sections include statistical snapshots of Indianapolis' multi-tenant office vacancy rates and the local industrial market.
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Fourth-quarter 2012 commercial real estate statistics for IndianapolisRestricted Content

March 9, 2013
Commercial Real Estate Focus sections include statistical snapshots of Indianapolis' multi-tenant office vacancy rates and the local industrial market.
More

Second-quarter commercial real estate statistics for IndianapolisRestricted Content

September 22, 2012
Commercial Real Estate Focus sections include statistical snapshots of Indianapolis' multi-tenant office vacancy rates and the local industrial market.
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Suburban office market gaining ground on downtown

July 24, 2012
Tom Harton
Figures from Cassidy Turley showed the suburban market growing by 247,000 square feet while downtown contracted by 68,000 square feet in the first half of the year.
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Suburban office market turns in strong first quarter

April 17, 2012
Tom Harton
Net absorption was the highest in five years, chipping away at what has been a chronically high vacancy rate.
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Office stats don't tell full story of market's recovery

April 19, 2011
Tom Harton
Cassidy Turley's research director said the pace of leasing activity is the best he’s seen in 18 to 24 months.
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Fourth-quarter commercial real estate stats for IndianapolisRestricted Content

February 19, 2011
Statistics for Indianapolis office and industrial property.
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Second-quarter commercial real estate stats

August 28, 2010
Statistical snapshots of Indianapolis' multi-tenant office vacancy rates and the local industrial market.
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Fourth-quarter commercial real estate stats

February 20, 2010
IBJ's Commercial Real Estate Focus sections include statistical snapshots of Indianapolis' multi-tenant office vacancy rates and the local industrial market.
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Third-quarter commercial real estate stats

November 21, 2009
IBJ's Commercial Real Estate Focus sections include statistical snapshots of Indianapolis' multi-tenant office vacancy rates and the local industrial market.
More
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  1. How much you wanna bet, that 70% of the jobs created there (after construction) are minimum wage? And Harvey is correct, the vast majority of residents in this project will drive to their jobs, and to think otherwise, is like Harvey says, a pipe dream. Someone working at a restaurant or retail store will not be able to afford living there. What ever happened to people who wanted to build buildings, paying for it themselves? Not a fan of these tax deals.

  2. Uh, no GeorgeP. The project is supposed to bring on 1,000 jobs and those people along with the people that will be living in the new residential will be driving to their jobs. The walkable stuff is a pipe dream. Besides, walkable is defined as having all daily necessities within 1/2 mile. That's not the case here. Never will be.

  3. Brad is on to something there. The merger of the Formula E and IndyCar Series would give IndyCar access to International markets and Formula E access the Indianapolis 500, not to mention some other events in the USA. Maybe after 2016 but before the new Dallara is rolled out for 2018. This give IndyCar two more seasons to run the DW12 and Formula E to get charged up, pun intended. Then shock the racing world, pun intended, but making the 101st Indianapolis 500 a stellar, groundbreaking event: The first all-electric Indy 500, and use that platform to promote the future of the sport.

  4. No, HarveyF, the exact opposite. Greater density and closeness to retail and everyday necessities reduces traffic. When one has to drive miles for necessities, all those cars are on the roads for many miles. When reasonable density is built, low rise in this case, in the middle of a thriving retail area, one has to drive far less, actually reducing the number of cars on the road.

  5. The Indy Star announced today the appointment of a new Beverage Reporter! So instead of insightful reports on Indy pro sports and Indiana college teams, you now get to read stories about the 432nd new brewery open or some obscure Hoosier winery winning a county fair blue ribbon. Yep, that's the coverage we Star readers crave. Not.

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