R&D

Judge upholds Lilly's Evista patent

September 24, 2009
J.K. Wall
A federal judge in Indianapolis turned back a patent challenge to Eli Lilly and Co.’s drug Evista, the company announced late yesterday.
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Lilly's Effient launch just one of its many challengesRestricted Content

August 3, 2009
Greg Andrews
Eli Lilly and Co. has blasted past analysts’ earnings projections for two straight quarters. But if Lilly officials take that as a sign they can breathe easier, they need only flip through a stack of Wall Street research reports on the company.
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Lilly cancels trials for experimental MS drug

July 28, 2009
J.K. Wall
Eli Lilly and Co. and a development partner has canceled clinical trials on an experimental drug to treat multiple sclerosis after the drug failed to delay progression of the disease in trial patients.
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Professors go online to revolutionize drug discoveryRestricted Content

July 20, 2009
 IBJ Staff
Two chemistry professors at IUPUI are laboring to create the McDonald’s of research laboratories—low-cost and all over the world.
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With Byetta's sales stalled, Lilly unveils its own competitorRestricted Content

June 15, 2009
 IBJ Staff
While Eli Lilly and Co. continues to work with a biotech firm on the diabetes medicine Byetta, it's developing a potential competitor to Byetta all on its own.
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Biotechnology firm boosts its protein bizRestricted Content

June 8, 2009
 IBJ Staff
Greenwood-based Elona Biotechnologies said it has created two subsidiaries to boost its biosimilar/biogeneric/follow-on protein business.
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Commercializing science takes too long, Cook saysRestricted Content

May 25, 2009
Taking science from the laboratory to the commercial market takes too much time and is littered with potential pitfalls along the way.
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With pharma famine looming, Lilly relying on snack-size dealsRestricted Content

May 4, 2009
J.K. Wall
Compared with some of his pharmaceutical CEO peers these days, John Lechleiter has his company on a diet. Instead of using a mega-merger to bulk up before the famine that patent expirations will bring on the industry next year, Lechleiter has Eli Lilly and Co. burning management fat while looking for smaller companies to munch on.
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Indiana playing trailblazing role in drive to tailor pharmaceuticals to genetic makeup of individualsRestricted Content

April 13, 2009
Chris O'Malley
Indiana is becoming not only a hotbed of "pharmacogenomics" research, but also a trailblazer in finding practical ways to use it on the practitioner level.
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Biotech push may help offset generic competition; some analysts skepticalRestricted Content

February 2, 2009
J.K. Wall
Lilly executives want to make biotech their top focus.
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Lilly taps hedge fund to cut research costs for Alzheimer's drugsRestricted Content

August 11, 2008
J.K. Wall

Eli Lilly and Co.'s unorthodox efforts to develop new treatments for Alzheimer's disease--if successful--could usher in a new approach to drug development. The Indianapolis-based pharmaceutical company announced that a New York hedge fund, TPG-Axon Capital, will invest up to $325 million to help cover the exorbitant development costs of two experimental compounds to treat Alzheimer's disease.

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Lilly under gun to replace aging blockbuster ZyprexaRestricted Content

November 5, 2007
J.K. Wall
There's a $2 billion hole in Eli Lilly and Co.'s future. That's roughly how much pretax profit Lilly derives each year from its best-seller, Zyprexa, according to calculations by IBJ. And it's how much black ink will start running off Lilly's books once Zyprexa's U.S. and European patents expire in 2011.
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Lilly still breathing in inhaler pursuitRestricted Content

April 2, 2007
J.K. Wall
Pfizer Inc.'s new inhaled insulin product, Exubera, has stumbled out of the gate. That would appear to keep the door open for Eli Lilly and Co., as well as for other companies racing to develop inhaled insulin. But Pfizer's troubles might cause doctors and patients to sour on all inhaled insulin products.
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Lilly decides to self-insure for product liabilityRestricted Content

September 4, 2006
Tom Murphy
Eli Lilly and Co. has picked an insurer it knows extremely well to cover future problems in the high-stakes world of product liability litigation--itself. The Indianapolis drugmaker opted for self-insurance after struggling to find coverage in what it terms a "very restrictive insurance market."
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  1. I'm sure Indiana is paradise for the wealthy and affluent, but what about the rest of us? Over the last 40 years, conservatives and the business elite have run this country (and state)into the ground. The pendulum will swing back as more moderate voters get tired of Reaganomics and regressive social policies. Add to that the wave of minority voters coming up in the next 10 to 15 years and things will get better. unfortunately we have to suffer through 10 more years of gerrymandered districts and dispropionate representation.

  2. Funny thing....rich people telling poor people how bad the other rich people are wanting to cut benefits/school etc and that they should vote for those rich people that just did it. Just saying..............

  3. Good try, Mr. Irwin, but I think we all know the primary motivation for pursuing legal action against the BMV is the HUGE FEES you and your firm expect to receive from the same people you claim to be helping ~ taxpayers! Almost all class action lawsuits end up with the victim receiving a pittance and the lawyers receiving a windfall.

  4. Fix the home life. We're not paying for your child to color, learn letters, numbers and possible self control. YOU raise your children...figure it out! We did. Then they'll do fine in elementary school. Weed out the idiots in public schools, send them well behaved kids (no one expects perfection) and watch what happens! Oh, and pray. A mom.

  5. To clarify, the system Cincinnati building is just a streetcar line which is the cheapest option for rail when you consider light rail (Denver, Portland, and Seattle.) The system (streetcar) that Cincy is building is for a downtown, not a city wide thing. With that said, I think the bus plan make sense and something I shouted to the rooftops about. Most cities with low density and low finances will opt for BRT as it makes more financial and logistical sense. If that route grows and finances are in place, then converting the line to a light rail system is easy as you already have the protected lanes in place. I do think however that Indy should build a streetcar system to connect different areas of downtown. This is the same thing that Tucson, Cincy, Kenosha WI, Portland, and Seattle have done. This allows for easy connections to downtown POI, and allows for more dense growth. Connecting the stadiums to the zoo, convention center, future transit center, and the mall would be one streetcar line that makes sense.

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